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40 terms

AP 11 Lit Terms 2

This is the second set of lit terms for AP 11 classes. Watch out for figurative language terms; they're tough!
STUDY
PLAY
expository writing
writing that intends to inform, explain, argue; nonfiction
fiction
literary prose based on imagination and not necessarily on fact
figurative language
writing that goes beyond the literal, original use of the words; aka figure of speech. There are two types: tropes and schemes.
trope
words that MEAN more than what they say directly; one of the two main figures of speech
metaphor
a comparison of two seemingly unlike objects for the purpose of creating interest in imaginative writing;a type of trope
simile
a comparison of two seemingly unlike objects using the words LIKE or AS; a type of trope
conceit
an elaborate metaphor that drives a whole poem or story; a type of trope
metonymy
referring to something by naming an object closely associated with it; a type of trope
synecdoche
referring to something by naming one part of the object; a type of trope
hyperbole
exaggeration for emphasis; opposite of understatement; a type of trope
litotes
understatement done for emphasis by saying what something is not; a type of trope
symbolism
using a literal object to represent an abstract idea; a type of trope
scheme
interesting ARRANGEMENT or play with words, often times to effect the sound; one of the two main figures of speech
alliteration
repetition of consonant sounds at the beginnings of words; a type of scheme
assonance
repetition of vowel sounds within words; a type of scheme
consonance
repetition of consonant sounds within words; a type of scheme
onomatopoeia
words that imitate the sounds they describe; a type of scheme
parallelism
wording ideas of equal importance with a similar sentence structure and often placing them in succesion; a type of scheme
appositive
a noun set beside another noun to explain or identify it; a type of scheme
anastrophe
inverting the natural order of words; a type of scheme (Think Yoda!)
anadiplosis
a word or a phrase is repeated twice in a row; it's at the end of one sentence or clause and then again at the beginning of the next sentence or clause; a type of scheme
antithesis
the opposite or contrast of ideas written in similar sentence structure; a type of scheme
foreshadowing
hints or clues that prepare the reader for future events
genre
a type of literature (be able to name some)
imagery
sensory detail
irony
the contrast between expectations and reality; 3 types exist
verbal irony
the character or author says one thing, but means something else
dramatic irony
the audience/ reader sees or knows something that other characters cannot; ensuing events are ironic
situational irony
one event is expected to occur, but something entirely different actually occurs
loaded language
emotionally charged words used to persuade
local color
style of writing that brings regional literature alive by detailing dialect, dress, mannerism, customs, character types, and landscapes of a particular area of the country
monologue
a speech given by one person; if alone on stage=soliloquy; if alone in a story=interior monologue
motif
an idea that resurfaces throughout an individual work
narrative
writing that tells a story; may be true or false or a combination
narration
description of actions in a story
nonfiction
prose written about real people, events, places, and ideas
novel
an extended work of fiction
understatement
giving less credit than something is worth; opposite of hyperbole; a type of trope
chiasmus
two clauses, the 2nd of which reverses the order of the first; a type of scheme. Ex: "Let us never negotiate out of fear, but let us never fear to negotiate" (JFK's Inaugural Address).
isocolon
using parallelism/ anaphora in a list; a type of scheme; aka bicolon, tricolon, tetracolon. Ex: "of the people, by the people, for the people"