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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Spectral type B
  2. Betelgeuse
  3. Star Clusters
  4. Spectral Type
  5. Proxima Centauri
  1. a Stars color/surface temperature E - this is how we classify stars.
  2. b Next closest star after the Sun. Part of the three-star Alpha Centauri system. 4.3 light years away. (50 mile high stack of toilet paper stretched out 1 sheet = 1 million miles scale. Parallax angle of 0.77 arcsecond. From the Sun, 1.3 pc or 4.3 ly away or 3.98 x 10^13 km (2.43 x 10^13 miles). Largest Parallax angle we see.
  3. c Spectral type M (red) Temperature range <3,500 K.
  4. d Consist of two major groups: Open and Globular
  5. e Pale Blue -Temperature range: 10,000 - 30,000 K

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. What we see in the sky. Star Charts and planispheres use different size "dots" to represent.
  2. White star - Temperature range >30,000 k.
  3. Cool stars which are a little smaller and dimmer than the supergiants.
  4. Spectral type A (aqua) Temperature range: 7,500 - 10,000 K
  5. A Star's total amount of power radiated into space; measured in watts

5 True/False questions

  1. PolarisSpectral type F (pale yellow) Temperature range: 6,000-7,500 K.

          

  2. Parallax ShiftThe apparent shift of an object relative to some distant background as the observer's point of view changes. Allows you to determine close stellar distances. Only works with fairly close stars

          

  3. Cepheid VariablesOne example of a pulsating variable. Massive, high luminosity stars with short periods of one to 70 days and light variations of 0.1 to 2 magnitudes. Astronomers use these as a "standard" for distances.

          

  4. ArcturusSpectral type K (orange) Temperature range: 3,500 - 5,000 K.

          

  5. Cataclysmic VariablesOne example of a pulsating variable. Massive, high luminosity stars with short periods of one to 70 days and light variations of 0.1 to 2 magnitudes. Astronomers use these as a "standard" for distances.