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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Virginia Plan
  2. Separation of powers
  3. The Great Compromise
  4. Alexander Hamilton
  5. Department of the Navy
  1. a Virginia delegate James Madison's plan of government, in which states got a number of representatives in Congress based on their population
  2. b Leader of the Federalists. First Secretary of the Treasury. He advocated creation of a national bank, assumption of state debts by the federal government, and a tariff system to pay off the national debt.
  3. c All bills would originate in the house
    Direct taxes on states according to population

    2 houses
    -the senate would have 2 representatives from each state
    -House of Representatives would be based on population
  4. d the division of power among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government
  5. e created because of Quasi war.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. Written anonymously by Jefferson and Madison in response to the Alien and Sedition Acts, they declared that states could nullify federal laws that the states considered unconstitutional (breaking its compact with the states. Nullification was based on John Locke's compact theory).
  2. These consist of four laws passed by the Federalist Congress and signed by President Adams in 1798:

    - the Naturalization Act, which increased the waiting period for an immigrant to become a citizen from 5 to 14 years

    - the Alien Act, which empowered the president to arrest and deport dangerous aliens

    - the Alien Enemy Act, which allowed for the arrest and deportation of citizens of countries at war with the US

    - the Sedition Act, which made it illegal to publish defamatory statements about the federal government or its officials.

    The first 3 were enacted in response to the XYZ Affair, and were aimed at French and Irish immigrants, who were considered subversives.

    The Sedition Act was an attempt to stifle Democratic-Republican opposition, although only 25 people were ever arrested, and only 10 convicted, under the law.

    The Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, which initiated the concept of "nullification" of federal laws were written in response to the Acts.
  3. General in the Revolutionary War
    -first President of the United States
    -set precedence for the country: 2 terms in office, the three executive departments
    -against political parties
  4. 3rd President of the United States, 2nd Vice President (under John Adams), 1st Secretary of State
    chief drafter of the Declaration of Independence; made the Louisiana Purchase in 1803
  5. established a Supreme Court (with a Chief Justice and five associate justices) and district courts

5 True/False questions

  1. election of 1792- George Washington became pres. for a second term.
    - Hamilton and Jefferson wrote letters to GW and ask him to stay another term
    - GW was elected unanimously again, Adams was VP again
    - He did not trust and was against political parties.

          

  2. Jay's Treaty- America could settle the Northern border of Florida
    - Could deposit goods at mouth of Missipi River (New Orleans)
    - Spain promised it would prevent Indian raids over the border

          

  3. Report on ManufacturingJames Hamilton's plan (1791).
    - Growth of industry
    - included: tariffs, loans, grants, the excise tax (distilled liquor --> Whiskey Rebellion), and the improvement of infrastructure.

          

  4. James Madison3rd President of the United States, 2nd Vice President (under John Adams), 1st Secretary of State
    chief drafter of the Declaration of Independence; made the Louisiana Purchase in 1803

          

  5. whiskey rebellion- farmers in Pennsylvania rebelled against Hamilton's excise tax on whiskey
    - an army, led by Washington, put down the rebellion.
    - The incident showed that the new government under the Constitution could react swiftly and effectively to such a problem, in contrast to the inability of the government under the Articles of Confederation to deal with Shay's Rebellion.