NAME

Question types


Start with


Question limit

of 1506 available terms
(11 exact duplicates found)

Advertisement Upgrade to remove ads
Print test

5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. episode
  2. stifle
  3. holler
  4. plural
  5. demystify
  1. a to make something easier to understand. eg: What I need is a book that will demystify the workings of a car engine for me. eg: Demystifying SAP's Ramp-Up process
  2. b The possessive adjectives never change ,they stay the same whether the noun is singular or plural.my book,my books,OK?
  3. c to shout loudly.
    He was hollering something about seeing a snake.
    He let out a holler as he fell.
    "To a community in Ferguson that is rightly hurting and looking for answers, let me call once again for us to seek some understanding rather than simply holler at each other. Let's seek to heal rather than to wound each other. As Americans we've gotta use this moment to seek our shared humanity that's been laid bare by this moment."
  4. d a single event or group of related events.eg:This latest eg:episode in the fraud scandal has shocked a lot of people. eg:The drugs, the divorce and the depression - it's an episode in his life that he wants to forget.
    eg: Researchers from Africa and Europe compared viral DNA from this outbreak to previous episodes.
  5. e to prevent something from happening, being expressed or continuing.
    She stifled a cough/yawn/scream/sneeze.
    I don't know how I managed to stifle my anger.
    We should be encouraging new ideas, not stifling them.
    eg: "You don't have anybody on the Internet stifling speech in English, censoring speech in English. And most of the dominant English-language countries internally also have a tradition of freedom of speech."

    Martinez says that English is seen as a more neutral language than Chinese. Unlike Chinese, it is not associated with one country. He says even the ideas of equality are built into English grammar.

    "If you study German, if you study Spanish, if you study Russian, there are many languages where the "you" form and how you conjugate verbs is very different depending on whether you're talking to a grandparent or a boss versus one of your children or an employee or a close friend...If I'm talking to President Obama or if I'm talking to my closest friend or my son, its 'you.'"

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. 1. If a part of your body is numb, you are unable to feel it, usually for a short time
    2.not able to feel any emotions or to think clearly, because you are so shocked or frightened.
    When she first heard the news, she was numb with disbelief.
    Ever since his girlfriend left him he has felt numb.
    eg:Then, Linda found an organization called Bet Tzedek. Bet Tzedek provides free legal help to those who cannot pay a lawyer. The staff connected Linda with pro bono lawyers from a large legal group who accepted her case.

    After a year of fighting, Linda finally won guardianship of Michael. She says the shock of finally having Michael legally in her home left her numb -- feeling almost senseless.

    "I was kind of numb for a while and until I said, my goodness it happened. It finally happened. Now he's with me. Now I can go home and say to Michael, we have a home, Michael."
  2. unusual and often exciting because of coming (or seeming to come) from a far, especially tropical country.exotically dressed dancers. exotic flowers/food/designs. eg:The traditional Chinese dinner plate is getting a makeover as tastes in the country begin to change. Exotic seafood and different meats are now being purchased at increasing rates.
  3. defence.(a) protection or support against attack, criticism or infection.
    The rebels' only form of defence against the soldiers' guns was sticks and stones.
    The war has ended but government spending on defence (= the country's armed forces) is still increasing.
    When Helen criticized me, Chris came/rushed to my defence (= quickly supported me).
    The book is a closely argued defence of (= something that supports) the economic theory of Keynes.
    The towers were once an important part of the city's defences.
    A good diet helps build the body's natural defences.
    eg:One week after Clay first proposed the compromise, he rose in the Senate to speak in its defense. The Senate hall was crowded. People had come from as far away as Boston and New York to hear Clay speak. Some senators said there had not been such a crowd in the capitol building since the day Clay said goodbye to the Senate eight years earlier.
  4. to criticize something or someone strongly, usually for moral reasons
  5. The chromosphere is the middle of the three regions that make up the sun's atmosphere. It is extremely wide and extends 1,200 miles (1,931 kilometers) above the photosphere. Temperatures in the chromosphere increase from 4,500 degrees Kelvin to about 10,000 degrees Kelvin. Scientists believe that the chromosphere is heated by the friction caused by the turbulent convection currents in the photosphere. Accordingly, the churning gases in the photosphere produce spikes of hot gas called spicules that rise up to 3,000 miles (4,828 kilometers) into the chromosphere.

5 True/False questions

  1. intenseA short introductory advertisement for a product that stimulates interest by remaining cryptic.
    eg:Bruce Jakosky leads the mission. He is a professor in the geological sciences department at the University of Colorado in Boulder. He said Tuesday that seven of the spacecraft's eight instruments are already providing information to scientists. He says much more will be received from the instruments in the next few weeks.
    "What we're seeing so far is really just a tantalizing teaser of what's to come."

          

  2. veto(a) refusal to allow something to be done.
    The Ministry of Defence has the power of veto over all British arms exports.
    In theory the British government could use its veto to block this proposal.
    The Senate voted to override the President's veto of the proposed measures.
    mainly UK Mum has put a veto on our watching television for more than two hours an evening.
    eg:The bill passed in both the House of Representatives and the Senate. This left President Adams with a difficult decision. Should he sign it into law? Or should he veto it?

    If he signed the bill, it would show he believed that the Constitution allowed protective duties. That decision would create even more opposition to him in the South. If he vetoed it, then he would lose support in the West and Northeast. Adams signed the bill. But he made clear that Congress was fully responsible for it.

          

  3. leap yearA short introductory advertisement for a product that stimulates interest by remaining cryptic.
    eg:Bruce Jakosky leads the mission. He is a professor in the geological sciences department at the University of Colorado in Boulder. He said Tuesday that seven of the spacecraft's eight instruments are already providing information to scientists. He says much more will be received from the instruments in the next few weeks.
    "What we're seeing so far is really just a tantalizing teaser of what's to come."

          

  4. knock-offto interrupt a public speech or performance with loud unfriendly statements or questions
    A few angry locals started heckling (the speaker).
    eg:he thinks the heckling of Li was intended mainly to express the humiliation and resentment of Hong Kong's people.

          

  5. be/get bogged downused to describe something as another, more exciting, interesting or unusual thing, as a way of emphasizing its character.
    My garden had become a veritable jungle by the time I came back from holiday.
    eg:The culprit, researchers say, is plastic. Coming from virtually everywhere — a veritable river of garbage winding its way into the world's oceans — the trash concentrates in five of the Earth's ocean gyres, which are naturally occurring circular currents, according to University of Hawaii marine scientist Dave Karl.