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Music History 2

Music history 2
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The aristocratic composer-poets of northern france were the
a. trouveres
b. troubadours
c. bards
d. chansonniers
a. trouveres
love was a main topic of secular song among all but the
a. troubadors
b. trouveres
c. goliards
d. minnesangers
e. all of the above
c. golliards
chromatic alterations employed to produce a more melodic line or to avoid sounding an augmented fourth were known as
a. musica ficta
b. minims
c. harmonia ficta
d. diastematic notation
a. musica ficta
latin songs dating from the late tenth century to the early thirteenth century and associated with wandering students and clerics are known as
a. epics
b. goliard songs
c. versus
d. trouvere songs
goliard songs
the vielle was which type of string instrument?
a. a five-stringed instruemtn played with a bow
b. a harp on the English style
c. a keyboard instrumetn that was the ancestor of the harpsichord
d. a one-stinged instrument uesd for teaching the intervals
a. a five-stringed instrument
The increase during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in amateur music making for pleasure or social entertainment is a direct result of:
a. the introduction of music printing and the wider dissemination of written music
b. the closing of courts throughout France, Italy, and Germany
c. church bans on secular compositions
d. compositional taxes placed on professional musicians
a. the introduction of music printing and the wider dissemination of written music
The most famous composer of the fifteenth century, evident from the presence of his music in manuscripts copied throughout Europe, was
a. John Dunstable
b. Guillaume du Fay
c. Gilles de Binchois
d. Johannes Ockeghem
b. Guillaume du Fay
In cantus firmus masses, the borrowed melody is usually found in the
a. tenor
b. altus
c. superius
d. bassus
a. tenor
The music of Guillaume Du Fay is best described as
a. compositions that avoided international influences, focusing instead on the retention and development of a national style
b. compositions that disregarded national and regional styles, attempting instead to reproduce the contenance angloise
c. compositions that borrowed from Italian and French musical traditions in an attempt to offer an alternative to the increasing popularity of an English style.
d. compositions that blended musical characteristics from French, Italian, and English traditions, representing a new international style of composition
d. compositions that blended musical characteristics from French, Italian, and English traditions, representing a new international style of composition
A plainsong mass gained coherence between parts of the Ordinary by employing
a. a similar style in each of the parts
b. the same thematic material in each of the parts
c. shared musical elements between parts
d. liturgically-appropriate, pre-existing chant, which corresponded with the text of each part
d. liturgically-appropriate, pre-existing chant, which corresponded with the text of each part
The cantus-firmus mass usually derived its name from:
a. the borrowed melody
b. the event for which the mass was written
c. the composer's primary patron
d. the primary mode employed throughout the composition
a. the borrowed melody
The cantus-firmus mass creates coherence between sections by:
a. employing a brief but identifiable four-note motive from a pre-existing cantus firmus in each part of the Ordinary
b. constructing each of the parts of the Ordinary around the same cantus firmus, normally placed in the tenor
c. employing a single cantus firmus for each part of the Ordinary, which is connected through a shared mode
d. alternating between a ewly composed cantus firmus and a plainchant that are related through shared musical elements
b. constructing each of the parts of the Ordinary around the same cantus firmus, normally placed in the tenor
In this compositional technique used in the top voice, the melody is given a rhythm and ornamented by adding notes around those of the chant:
a. burden
b. paraphrase
c. hocket
d. fauxburden
b. paraphrase
One of the earliest composers to use a secular tune as a cantus firmus was
a. John Dunstable
b. Gilles de Binchois
c. Johannes Oceghem
d. Guillaume du Fay
d. Guillaume du Fay
Beginning in the fifteenth century, the following term referred to a polyphonic setting of a Latin text other than a mass cycle
a. motet
b. chanson
c. ballade
d. carole
a. motet
The following composer was employed by the court of Phillip the Good and was highly regarded for his chanson compositions:
a. Philippe de Vitry
b. John Dunstable
c. Gilles de Binchois
d. Guillaume du Fay
c. Gilles de Binchois
In this type of English improvised polyphony, a plainchant in the middle voice is joined by an upper voice a perfect fourth above it and a lower voice singing mostly in parallel thirds below:
a. faburden
b. chace
c. rota
d. fauxbourdon
a. faburden
A mass which utilizes the same melodic motive in the beginning of each part of the mass is called a:
a. plainsong mass
b. motto mass
c. cantus firmus mass
d. imitation mass
b. motto mass
Du Fay's Missa Se la face ay pale borrows its cantus firmus from the following
a. polyphonic chanson
b. ballade
c. plainchant
d. polyphonic carol
b. ballade
A fourteenth-century allegorical narrative poem which used satire to comment on corruption in politics and the church in France was__________.
Roman de Fauvel
Messe de Nostre Dame was one of the earliest polyphonic settings of the Mass Ordinary and likely the first mass to be composed by a single composer. His name was____________.
Guillame de Machaut
The shawm was similar to what modern-day instrument?
a. flute
b. trumpet
c. oboe
d. violin
c. oboe
Portative and positive refer to two types of
a. dance forms
b. string instruments
c. flutes
d. organs
e. love lyrics
d. organs
Jongleurs were
a. traveling entertainers who juggled as well as sang
b. vielle players hired for their virtuoso skills
c. troubadours from noble backgrounds
d. female troubadours
e. students who snag secular songs in Latin
a. traveling entertainers who juggled as well as sang
A chansonnier was
a. a singer who traveled from castle to castle
b. an entertainer who juggled as well as sang
c. a songwriter who specialized in love songs
d. the northern French equivalent of a trobairitz
e. a book of songs
e. a book of songs
The largest collection of notated organal voices in the:
a. Musica enchiriadis
b. Winchester Troper
c. Ad organum faciendum
d. Codex Calixtinus
b. Winchester Troper
Which composer composed quadruplum, or organa for four voices?
a. Leoninus
b. Perotinus
c. Franco of Cologne
d. Anonymous IV
b. Perotinus
The medieval motet began as an elaboration or troping of which genre?
a. substitute clausulae
b. florid organum
c. sequence
d. conductus
e. Alleluia
a. substitute clausalae
A style of organum in which both voices move in modal rhythm is called
a. organum style
b. discant style
c. florid style
d. modal style
b. discant style
Which of the following is not a feature of polyphonic conductus?
a. the tenor voice came from Gregorian chant
b. the text was rhymed metrical poetry
c. a melisma called a cauda sometimes preceded or followed phrases
d. The tenor voice had the same rhythmic speed as the upper voices
e. It died out ca. 1250
a. the tenor voice came from Gregorian chant
A system for notation duration developed by musicians at Notre Dame was described in a thirteenth-century treatise attributed to:
a. Leoninus
b. Perotinus
c. Johannes de Garlandia
d. Guido of Arezzo
c. Johannes de Garlandia
Relative durations signified by note shapes were first introduced by Franco of Cologne in his treatise:
a. Magnus liber organi
b. Ars cantus mensurabilis
c. Ad organum faciendum
d. Anonymous IV treatise
b. Ars cantus mensurabilis
Organum in which all the voices sing in measured rhythm is called
a. copula
b. organum duplum
c. organum triplum
d. discant
e. versus
d. discant
The center for polyphonic composition in the thirteenth century was
a. Paris
b. southwestern France
c. Italy
d. Germany
e. Worcestor, England
a. Paris
The writer who named two composers of the Notre Dame school was
a. Perotinus
b. Anonymous IV
c. Petrus de Cruce
d. Franco of Cologne
b. Anonymous IV
Which late medieval polyphonic genre could have words in both French and Latin?
a. organum triplum
b. motet
c. conductus
d. rondellus
e. cauda
b. motet
Which of these descriptions best characterizes English music in the thirteenth century?
a. Strict adherence to early compositional rules allowing only perfect consonances
b. close imitation of Parisian polyphonic styles of the same era
c. Improvisational quality, with little written down
d. Through-composed works with little repetition and sparse textures
e. Voice-exchange, canons, and preference for 6-3 chords
e. voice-exchange, canons, and preference for 6-3 chords
Which feature of Ars Nova composition was most offensive to conservatives?
a. isorhythm
b. duple meter
c. division of semibreves
d. fast-moving upper parts
e. secular texts
b. duple meter
Roman de Fauvel was
a. the composer who wrote the Ars nova treatise
b. an allegorical story interspersed with Ars Nova music
c. the theorist who objected to the Ars Nova style
d. a book of rules for how to notate Ars Nova motets
e. a thirteenth-century writer whose thinking influenced fourteenth-century composers
b. an allegorical story interspersed with Ars Nova music
Which French composer wrote the famous treatise The New Art which gave name to the musical movement and style in the 14th century?
a. Guillame de Machaut
b. Philippe de Vitry
c. Johannes Ciconia
d. Francesco Landini
e. Jacopo da Bologna
b. Philippe de Vitry
Who composed isorhythmic motets, monophonic secular songs, and a first complete Mass Ordinary setting?
a. Guillame de Machaut
b. Philippe de Vitry
c. Johannes Ciconia
d. Francesco Landini
e. Jacopo da Bologna
a. Guillame de Machaut
Who was the blind composer known for his ballate and had a cadence named after him?
a. Guillame de Machuat
b. Philippe de Vitry
c. Johannes Ciconia
d. Francesco Landini
e. Jacopo da Bologna
d. Francesco Landini
In an isorhythmic work, the repeating rhythmic pattern is called the
a. tempus
b. diminution
c. color
d. prolation
e. talea
e. talea
Musical instruments of the fourteenth century were divided into high and low depending on
a. pitch
b. length of tubing or strings
c. social status of the performer
d. loudness or softness
e. whether they were performed in towers or on the ground
d. loudness or softness
Trecento composers used all except one of these genres. Which one they did not use?
a. Caccia
b. Madrigal
c. Ballata
d. Rondeau
e. Discant clausalae
e. discant clausulae
The Squarcialupi Codex is
a. a book containing an allegorical and satirical story interspersed with music
b. one of the main sources of Italian Trecento music
c. a treatise on Italian notation
d. a set of rules for writing madrigals
e. the complete works of Landini, which he compiled himself
b. one of the main source of Italian Trecento music
In English polyphony, a perpetual canon or round at the unison is called a
a. rondellus
b. rota
c. caude
b. rota
The Renaissance period is marked by an interest in
a. ancient Greek culture
b. religious conversion
c. exotic cultures
d. preserving medieval ideals
e. equality for all humans, no matter what their economic status
a. ancient Greek culture
The Renaissance period of music comprises roughly which centuries?
a. the thirteenth and fourteenth
b. the fourteenth and fifteenth
c. the fifteenth and sixteenth
d. the sixteenth and seventeenth
e. the fourteenth through the seventeenth
the fifteenth and sixteenth
Renaissance painters achieved realistic effects through the use of
a. more advanced application of medieval techniques
b. paints with chemical additives imported from North Africa
c. techniques borrowed from Byzantine style
d. perspective and treatment of light
d. perspective and treatment of light
Renaissance musicians paralleled these achievements in their use(s) of
a. contrast between high and low registers and fuller textures
b. clarity of musical structure through frequent cadences and stylistic contrasts
c. focusing on a single tonal center was the equivalent of using a single vanishing point
d. all of the above
d. all of the above
Court chapels were significant for music history because
a. musicians deposited copies of their manuscripts there
b. contracts for guilds, the predecessors of unions, were signed there
c. they hired musicians for both scared and secular music
d. they settled disputes between musicians and employers
e. they published the works of important composers
c. they hired musicians for both sacred and secular music
For much of the Renaissance, musicians working in Italy had been trained in
a. Italy
b. France, the Netherlands, or Flanders
c. England
d. Spain
e. Byzantium
b. France, the Netherlands, or Flanders
The term"temperament" in the 16th century refers to
a. the belief that music should be moderate in order to create good citizens
b. a method for printing music
c. a system of voice-leading rules for counterpoint
d. a system of tuning all pitches of a keyboard instrument to make thirds and sixths sound good
e. the belief that each mode has its own mood
d. a system of tuning all pitches of a keyboard instrument to make thirds and sixths sound good
The idea that music could be a social accomplishment, widely accepted accepted during the Renaissance period, came from
a. ancient Greece
b. fifteenth-century Greece
c. Flanders
d. England
e. the Bible
a. ancient Greece
Which of the following statements is true?
a. Musicians in the Renaissance did not believe in music's power to influence emotion
b. Renaissance musicians believed the magical properties of Greek music were lost forever
c. Renaissance musicians believed music had power to influence human emotion, but they were not interested in putting their belief into practice
d. Renaissance musicians used many devices to try to sway listeners' emotions
e. the pope forbade Renaissance musicians from attempting to portray emotion in music
d. Renaissance musicians used many devices to try to sway listeners' emotions
The Swiss theorist who dded four new modes in his book Dodekachordan was
a. Gioseffoo Zarlino
b. Heinrich Glarenaus
c. Johannes Tictoris
d. Jacopo de Bologna
b. Heinrich Glareanus
Ottavio Petrucci is known for
a. writing a treatise naming the best composers of his time
b. developing a realistic style of painting
c. hiring the first paid, secular choir
d. translating Greek treatises into Latin
e. publishing music using a three-impression method
e. publishing music using a three-impression method
In the Renaissance, secular music was
a. banned by the Church
b. the predominant type of music
c. performed but never written down
d. composed by musicians who also composed church music
e. composed by specialists who never composed church music
d. composed by musicians who also composed church music
Social factors influencing Renaissance music included
a. equal rights for women
b. Europe's economic vitality
c. the Black Death
d. church control over secular life
e. suppression of the middle class
b. Europe economic vitality
The primary audience for printed music was/were
a. the Church
b. missionaries in the new world
c. collectors who viewed them as works of art
d. amateur musicians throughout Europe and the Americas
e. a tiny group of the economic elite
d. amateur musicians throughout Europe and the Americas
Music and art of the Renaissance shared which of these characteristics?
a. They aimed to use art to convert more people to Christianity
b. an interest in the individual
c. complex textures that obscured each individual line
d. an attempt to preserve medieval values
e. decorative figuration in complex patterns
b. an interest in the individual
Aeolian and ionian modes were
a. added to the modal system by Heinrich Glareanus
b. discarded from the modal system in the sixteenth century
c. modes used for secular music only
d. added to the modal system by the Church
e. tuning systems used for harps
a. added to the modal system by Heinrich Glareanus
In what way did the Hundred Years' War influence music?
a. it put a halt to all secular music
b. the nobility could no longer afford to support music
c. English composers spent time in France
d. Composers from different regions became isolated from one another
e. It inspired nationalistic genres
c. English composers spent time in France
The contenance angloise refers to
a. the English style of polyphony
b. an anti-English secular song that became very popular in France
c. a musical instrument that was the forerunner of the English horn
d. a dance that was popular in England
e. French disdain for English style
a. the English style of polyphony
Cantilena is best defined as
a. a compositional style that imitates a bagpipe
b. an improvised third voice added to a two-voice piece
c. a freely composed, homorhythmic piece
d. secular song in the French style
e. using two cantus-firmus tenor voices
c. freely composed, homorhythmic piece
The Old Hall manuscript contains
a. sacred polyphony, including works of Dunstable
b. the earliest mass cycles built on secular French songs
c. secular song from Burgundy
d. Tinctoris's treatise
e. Walter Odington's treatise
a. sacred polyphony, including works of Dunstable
Du Fay's career was spent
a. entirely in the service of the duke of Burgundy
b. entirely in the Church, at a cathedral in Cambrai and one in Paris
c. divided between secular posts in Italy and a cathedral post in Cambrai
d. traveling from court to court, including courts in England, France, Italy, and Spain
e. at the University of Paris, where he taught composition and rhetoric
d. traveling from court to court, including courts in England, France, Italy, and Spain
Fauxbourdon is best defined as
a. alternation of two and three voice textures
b. an Englsih approach to isorhythm
c. three-voice works composed in streams of 6-4 chords
d. two composed voices with an improvised third voice, creating 6-3 chords
e. a work composed in imitation of bagpipe, with a single melody composed over a drone in parallel fifths
d. two composed voices with an improvised third voice, creating 6-3 chords
The first collection of polyphonic music printed entirely from moveable type was Ottaviano Petrucci's:
a. Harmonice musices odhecaton
b. Liber de arte contrapuncti
c. Dodekachordon
a. Harmonice musices odhecaton
The synthesis of compositional elements from English, French, and Italian madrigal traditions led to this fifteenth-century compositional style
a. international style
b. Continental style
c. Burgundian style
d. cosmopolitan style
a. international style
The following idea about Renaissance music was not borrowed from Greek thought
a. chromaticism as an expressive device
b. music as a social accomplishment
c. influential power of the modes
d. mean-tone temperament
d. mean-tone temperament
A collection of more than four hundred songs in Galician-Portuguese in honor of the Virgin Mary, prepared about 1270 in Spain is known as _____________________ (name of the collection).
Cantigas de Santa Maria
A term used for pre-existing melody used in a new work in late medieval and early Renaissance periods was ___________________
cantus firmus
The term for the technique where two or more voices alternate in rapid succession, each resting while the other sings, developed in the thirteenth century and used in isorhythmic motets is known as ____________.
hocket
The two theorists who devised the new rules for counterpoint to include the newly-developed preference for 3rds and 6ths in the late 15th and 16th century were ________________ and _______________.
Zarlino and Glareanus
The two predominant textures of the Renaissance music are ________________ and ________________.
homophony and imitative counterpoint
Phillipus de Caserta is one of the important representatives of a style of music cultivated at the court of the Avignon pope across southern France and northern Italy in the later part of 14th century. This style, a continuation of Ars Nova, was known for its rhythmic complexity use of constrasting meters in different voices, and unusual notation formats. The name of this style is ________________.
Ars Subtillor