330 terms

Mythology

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56. What is the name of the daughter of Tantalus whose children were slain by Apollo and Artemis
Niobe
Became a statue that still weeps water.
Niobe
57. What is the name of the Egyptian god of the underworld
Osiris
Judge of the Dead
Osiris
58. What is the name of the Egyptian goddess of motherhood and fertility
Isis
65. Who was the Greek god of healing
Asclepius
79. In Greek mythology, what is the name of the son of Chaos who is darkness personified
Erebus
86. Name the river flowing through Hades whose waters when drunk by the souls of the dead made them forget what they had done.
Lethe
97. What twins were the most famous sons of Leda who were conceived when she was raped by Zeus in the form of a swan
Castor and Pollux
109. Jupiter, disguised as a white bull, carried off what woman famed for her beauty
Europa
110. This boy, considered the most beautiful of all mortals, was carried off to Olympus to become the cup-bearer of Zeus.
Ganymede
113. This son of Agamemnon was pursued by the Furies after killing his mother, Clytemnestra, who had murdered his father.
Orestes
He was purified by Minerva so the Furies would leave him alone.
Orestes
greek God of Love
Eros
greek Goddesss of Youth
Hebe
greek Goddess of Discord
Eris
greek God of Death
Thanatos
21. According to Greek mythology, they where the brothers of Helen of Troy.
CASTOR AND POLLUX
What Greek figure is the symbol of eternal mourning as she mourns the loss of her entire family?
NIOBE
THE SKALDIC GOD OF POETRY IN NORSE MYTHOLOGY
BRAGI
in norse mythology, his role in providing health and abundance was often symbolized by his fylgia, the boar gullinborsti
freyr
goddess of love in norse mythology
freya
a god who possesses the resounding horn Gjallarhorn, owns the golden-maned horse Gulltoppr, has gold teeth, and is the son of Nine Mothers.
heimdall
is the wife of the thunder god Thor and is known for her golden hair.
sif
a hammer-wielding god associated with thunder, lightning, storms, oak trees, strength, the protection of mankind, and also hallowing and fertility.
thor
is associated with healing, death, royalty, the gallows, knowledge, battle, sorcery, poetry, frenzy, and the runic alphabet, and is the husband of the goddess Frigg.
odin
the wife of the god Odin.
Frigg
a goddess associated with foreknowledge and wisdom
Frigg
The norse God of Honor and Justice
tyr
this wife of Baldr produced a son, the god Forseti.
nanna
Wife of Baldr who reunited with him in death.
Nanna
norse god, his wife is Nanna and their son is Forseti.
baldr
Tricked and guided by Loki, he shot the mistletoe arrow which was to slay the otherwise invulnerable Baldr.
hodr
He was birthed for the sole purpose of avenging Baldr
vali
He kills Höðr who was an unwilling participant, and bindsLoki with the entrails of his son Narfi. survives ragnarok
Vali
This Greek goddess was pursued by Poseidon and Apollo, but refused their love.
HESTIA
According to Hesiod [HEE-see-ud], this goddess was the daughter of Zeus and Themis [THEH-mis], and was one of the Horae [HORE-ee]. .
IRENE
Who was the Greek goddess of peace?
Irene
A statue at the Acropolis showed her holding the child Plutus [PLOO-tus], the god of wealth, and her Roman counterpart was named Pax
Irene
This god killed many of the Cyclopes [sigh-KLOH-peez], was the son of Leto [LEE-toh], and was the power behind the Pythia [PITH-ee-uh]
APOLLO
This Greek god received sacrifices of dogs in Sparta, while his temple in Athens was at the foot of a namesake hill.
ARES (Not: MARS)
The brother of Eris and father of Phobos and Deimos, he fought on the side of Troy in the Trojan War, though he was an unpopular ally because of his chaotic nature.
Ares
This goddess rescued Iphigenia [if-uh-juh-NEE-uh] from the sacrificial knife of Agamemnon, whom she punished for one transgression by preventing a Greek fleet from sailing for Troy.
ARTEMIS
This figure wears a red full-body toga and is depicted with a laurel wreath and halo in a Diego Velázquez painting in which he addresses men working at a forge.
APOLLO
In a statue by Praxiteles [prahk-see-TAY-leez], this figure leans against a tree and opens his right hand as he prepares to kill a lizard.
Apollo
Name this figure, whom Gian [jahn] Lorenzo Bernini sculpted attempting to kiss the nymph Daphne, a Greek god often depicted alongside Hyacinthus.
Apollo
This Greek god was venerated in a festival held once every eight years to commemorate his slaying of a dragon known as Python.
(PHOEBUS) APOLLO
When he angered Zeus, he was forced to tend the flocks of Laomedon [lay-OM-ih-don].
Apollo
What Greek god sent visions to an oracle known as the Pythia, who resided in Delphi?
Apollo
In the Iliad, this Greek goddess was easily defeated by Hera in a fight.
ARTEMIS
Agamemnon was forced to sacrifice his daughter Iphigenia [if-uh-juh-NEE-uh] to appease her, and she set Actaeon's [ack-TEE-unz] dogs on him after turning him into a stag.
Artemis
H-5 As long as a statue of this goddess was inside Troy, the city would not be overrun by the Greeks, according to one prophecy.
(PALLAS) ATHENA
She and Hera lost the judgment of Paris to Aphrodite, and she was protected by a breastplate called an aegis [EE-jis].
Athena
After this Greek god's mother was killed by being exposed to the full glory of Zeus, Zeus sewed this infant god into his thigh.
DIONYSUS
This watchman was the enemy of Loki [LOH-kee] and carried the horn Gjallarhorn [YAHL-lahr-horn] to warn the gods of the approach of the giants for Ragnarök [RAHG-nuh-rock].
HEIMDALL
Name this Norse god who could see for up to 100 leagues.
Heimdall
He guards Bifrost [BIV-rost], the bridge into Asgard.
Heimdall
H-4 This group of gods comprised the chief gods that were common to many Germanic tribes.
AESIR
What group of Norse gods included the chief gods such as Tyr [TEER], Thor, Frigg, and Odin?
Aesir
Name the goddess whom the Norse gods made the driver of the chariot of the sun, the celestial body with which she is identified.
SOL
One edda calls this goddess Álfrödull [AHL-frur-dool], which means "elf-born." Her father betrothed her to Glen, which angered the Aesir [AY-sir].
SÓL
His messengers were ravens, and he sacrificed an eye in exchange for the gift of wisdom.
Odin
This god rode a horse descended from Loki [LO-kee] and Svadilfari [SVAL-far-ee].
ODIN (Accept: WODEN or WOTAN)
Which Norse god rides the horse Sleipnir [SLEYP-nir] and wields the spear Gungnir [GOONG-neer]?
Odin
Locations within this realm, located above Alfheim [ALV-heym], included Breidablik [BRY-duh-blick] and Thrudheim [THROOD-heym].
ASGARD(R)
Humans can only reach it by crossing over bifrost, the rainbow bridge.
Asgard
Identify this location of Valhalla [vahl-HALL-uh], the home of the Norse gods.
Asgard
In one legend, his gluttony prompts a fishing trip during which he recalls his battle with Jörmungander [YORE-mun-gahn-dur], whom he will both kill and be killed by at Ragnarök [RAHG-nuh-rock].
THOR
This god's name eventually replaced Jove's in a day of the week.
Thor
This Norse god of poets is the brother of Ve [VAY] and Vili [VEE-lee], who helped him kill Ymir [EE-mir].
ODIN (Accept: WODAN or WOTAN)
He made a sacrifice in Mimir's [MEE-mirz] Well to receive wisdom, uses ravens as his messengers, and rides an eight-legged steed named Sleipnir [SLAYP-nir].
Odin
What husband of Frigg rules over Valhalla?
Odin
This god's chariot is drawn by two goats that regenerate each time the god eats them.
THOR
He is married to the Earth goddess Sif, and is the nemesis of the serpent Jörmungandr [YORE-mun-"gander"]
Thor
This god changed himself into a snake and an eagle to steal the mead of poetry from a giant.
ODIN (Accept: WOTAN, WODEN)
He owned an arm ring that cloned itself eight times every ninth night, and was accompanied by the wolves Geri [GEH-ree] and Freki [FREH-kee].
Odin
What "all-father" was the chief of the Norse gods?
Odin
This Norse god was humanity's chief protector against Midgard's giants, trolls, and various evil creatures.
THOR
This Norse god dwelled in the hall Breidablik [BRY-dah-blick], and owned the massive ship Hringhorni [ring-OR-nee].
BALDUR (Accept: BALDR)
This god's mother, Frigg, extracted a promise from all things on the Earth, save one, not to harm this god, which led Loki to give his blind brother a spear of that material.
Baldur (Baldr)
Name this Norse god accidentally killed when Hodr [HOH-dur] threw mistletoe at him.
Baldur (Baldr)
This god, the husband of a goddess often described as "golden haired," is forced to don a wedding dress and is taken to the giant Thrymm in the guise of Freyja after Thrymm steals this god's weapon.
Thor
While this god is visiting the castle of Utgard-Loki, he is challenged to completely quaff a drinking horn that is constantly refilled by the sea.
THOR
Name this Norse god who wields Mjollnir.
Thor
This goddess's long blonde hair was cut off by Loki [LOH-kee], who offered to have craftsmen spin hair from gold to replace it.
SIF
Identify this Norse goddess, the wife of Thor, who lends her name to a volcano on the planet Venus.
Sif
24. He is associated with thunder, lightning, storms, oak trees, strength, destruction, fertility, healing, and the protection of mankind.
THOR
He was often depicted as fierce-eyed, red-haired, and red-bearded and was the husband of the goddess Sif.
Thor
Identify this hammer-wielding Norse god, who lends his name to a day of the week.
Thor
What watchman of the Norse gods guarded the upper end of the bridge Bifröst [BIV-rost]?
Heimdall
This god has a name that means "world-brightener," but was also called Gullintanni[GOOL-in-tahn-nee], which means "golden teeth."
HEIMDALL
He could sense grass growing, and he could see for more than a hundred miles, even in the dark.
Heimdall
Name this Norse god of poetry, war and magic, the ruler of Asgard.
Odin
Sacrifice occurs in a number of stories surrounding this deity, including his loss of an eye to Mimir's well, in order to gain the Wisdom of Ages, and his hanging from Yggdrasil [IG-druh-sil] for nine days and nights, with his own spear in his side.
ODIN
Animal servants of this god include the ravens Huginn and Muninn and the eight-legged horse Sleipnir [SLIPE-neer], and it is prophesied that he will be slain at Ragnarok by the wolf Fenrir.
Odin
What Norse god owned the Gjallarhorn [YAHL-lahr-horn], and was guardian of the bridge Bifrost [BIV-rost]?
Heimdall
This figure had nine mothers, and was played in a 2011 film by Idrees Elba.
HEIMDALL
He rode upon a golden horse, and would signal the coming of Ragnarok [RAHG-nuh-rock].
Heimdall
What Norse goddess receives one half of all fallen warriors, and is a goddess of both love and war?
Freyja
This child of Njord cries out, "Wake up, sister Hyndla!" at the beginning of a poem which chronicles the ancestors of Ottar.
FREYJA
She lent the Brisingamen BREE-sing-ah-men] to Thor as part of a disguise meant to fool a giant.
Freyja
What Norse god often plays the foil to Thor, and is the ultimate trickster?
Loki
In one story, after this god is restrained, his wife holds a bowl above his head to protect him from the poison dripping from a snake.
LOKI
His wife, Sigyn [SIG-in], is the mother of his son Narfi, while the giantess Angrboda [AHNG-ger-boh-duh] is the mother of his daughter, Hel.
Loki
Chief Babylonian god. A four-eyed, four-eared figure credited with arranging the year into months, the moons and stars, and creating mountains from the udders of another Babylonian deity. Also known as Bel.
Marduk
Husband of Isis, father of Horus, and brother of Set, served as god of the underworld, and protector of the dead.
Osiris
In addition to his role as the chief and judge of the underworld (as a result of his murder by Set), he also served as a god of vegetation and renewal; festivals honoring his death occurred around the time of the Nile flood's retreat.
Osiris
God of deserts, storms, chaos, and evil. Created in opposition to the forces of Ma'at, fought demon Apopis each day, emerging victorious, symbolic of the struggle of forces that brought harmony.
Seth
In later times, this struggle led him to be associated with the serpent itself, and he became the personification of violence and disorder, and the cause of all disasters.
Seth
Having killed his brother Osiris, he battled with Osiris' son Horus, being emasculated in the fight.
Seth
Wife and sister of Osiris, daughter of Geb and Nut, protected love, motherhood, and fate in the Egyptian myths.
Isis
Many of her roles are similar to the goddess Hathor, but she is often equated with the Greek Demeter.
Isis
Her powers were gained through tricking the god Ra by placing a snake in his path, which poisoned him, she forced him to give some power to her before she would cure him.
Isis
Personification of the midday sun, he was also venerated as Atum (setting sun) and Khepri (rising sun), which were later combined with him.
Ra
He traveled across the sky in a barge each day and then each night, the monster Apep would attempt to prevent his return.
Ra
He was portrayed with the head of a falcon, and crowned with the sun disc.
Ra
The god of the pharaohs, from the fourth dynasty onward all pharaohs termed themselves "sons of this deity," and after death they joined his entourage.
Ra
The god of the sky and light. Isis impregnated herself with the dead Osiris, and this child was hidden by his mother.
Horus
When he was grown, he avenged his father's death, driving away Set.
Horus
In the battle, he lost his eye, but regained it thanks to the god Thoth. Thus he came to rule over the earth. Represented with the head of a falcon.
Horus
Consort of Amun and goddess of war
Mut
Serving the gods as the supreme scribe, this ibis-headed god was known as the "tongue of Ptah" for his knowledge of hieroglyphics, and as the "Heart of Re" for his creative powers.
Thoth
His knowledge of science and calculation made him the creator of the calendar, and his symbol of the moon was due to his knowledge of how to calculate its path.
Thoth
He was consulted by Isis when attempting to resurrect Osiris, and was again consulted when the young Horus was stung by a scorpion.
Thoth
His knowledge of magic led to his association with the Greek Hermes.
Thoth
Son of Osiris and Nepthys, and god of embalming to the Egyptians, he was typically pictured with the head of a jackal.
Anubis
He also served as the god of the desert and the watcher of the tombs.
Anubis
He also served to introduce the dead to the afterlife, and as their judge.
Anubis
To decide the fate of the dead, this god would weigh the heart of the dead against the feather of truth. He is sometimes identified with Hermes or Mercury.
Anubis
The daughter of Ra, she predated the universe, and served over the creation of it, ensuring balance between everything.
Ma'at
Primarily seen as the keeper of order, she was responsible for seasons, day and night, rainfall, and star movements.
Ma'at
Her aspect as god of justice also showed through her role in death ritual, where her ostrich feather symbol was weighed against the hearts of the dead in the underworld.
Ma'at
Patron of women, daughter of Ra, and wife of Horus.
Hathor
She fulfilled many functions as goddess of the sky, goddess of fertility, protector of marriage, and goddess of love and beauty. In that final role she became equated with Aphrodite and Venus.
Hathor
Pictures of her show the goddess with the head of a cow.
Hathor
Goddess of water; termed the "lady of the castle," for her role as guardian of the tomb,
Nepthys
she sided against her own husband, Set, in his battle against Osiris, but when Set was destroyed, she collected the bits of his body, and brought him back to life, much as Isis had done for Osiris.
Nepthys
Isis' sister, she was also said to be Osiris' mistress, leading to much complaint from Isis. Due to her close ties to all the other gods, she was rarely associated with a cult of her own.
Nepthys
Feathered serpent, Aztec god of wind. Cortes pretended to be this deity in order to infiltrate the civilization and ultimately bring its downfall.
Quetzalcoatl
Aztec god of rain who makes things grow. Husband of Xochiquetzal
Tlaloc
Aztec goddess of butterflies, flowers, sensual love, pleasure, and art. Wife of Tlaloc
Xochiquetzal
name this Aztec god whose name meant "Smoking Mirror" and who fought with his brother Quetzalcoatl.
Tezcatlipocal
He disguised himself as an old man and tricked his brother into getting drunk, breaking his religious vows. This deity and his brother defeated Cipactli, who ate his foot, leading him to make a new foot out of obsidian.
Tezcatlipocal
This deity ruled over the age of the first sun, after which he was overthrown and turned into a jaguar.
Tezcatlipocal
Aztec goddess of life and death
Coatlicue
Aztec god with associations to both lightning and death
Xolotl
Aztec Underworld, associate with Xolotl
Mictlan
Mayan Underworld, complete with giant mushrooms and sulfur
Xibalba
A primordial giant who formed in the void of Ginnungagap from fire and ice.
Ymir
He gave birth to the frost giants and created the primordial cow Audhumla.
Ymir
He was killed by Odin and his brothers, who used his body to construct most of the universe
Ymir
The All-Father, he is the leader of the Aesir, the principal group of Norse gods.
Odin
He is a god of war, death, wisdom, poetry, and knowledge, and rides the eight-legged horse Sleipnir.
Odin
He hung himself for nine days on the world tree Yggsdrasil, pierced by his own spear, to gain knowledge,
Odin
He traded one of his eyes for a drink from Mimir's well to gain wisdom.
Odin
The wife of Odin, and mother by him of Balder, Hoder, Hermod, and Tyr. She is the goddess of the sky, marriage, and motherhood,
Frigga
She often works at her loom spinning clouds.
Frigga
The god of fertility, horses, sun, and rain, his possessions include the magic ship Skidbladnir.
Freyr
He travels in a chariot drawn by the golden boar Gullinbursti
Freyr
He had to give away his magic sword to win the hand of the giantess Gerda.
Freyr
Name for the second group of Norse gods
Vanir
Primary group of Norse gods
Aesir
The daughter of Njord and twin sister of Freyr, she is also a Vanir hostage living with the Aesir.
Freya
The goddess of love, passion, and human fertility, her possessions include a cloak that allows her to turn into a falcon, and the necklace Brisingamen.
Freya
She travels in a chariot drawn by two cats.
Freya
A son of Odin and the giantess Jord,
Thor
He's actually giant-kin, but lives with the Aesir and is Odin's blood-brother.
Loki
The god of fire and trickery, his many pranks include duping Hoder into killing Balder.
Loki
His children include the wolf Fenrir, the Midgard Serpent Jormungandr, Hel (the ruler of the underworld), and Sleipnir.
Loki
After killing Balder he was chained to three boulders with snakes dripping poison onto him.
Loki
The son of nine sisters, he is the god of light and guardians.
Heimdall
He guards Bifrost, the rainbow bridge into Asgard.
Heimdall
His senses are so sharp, he can see 100 miles by night or day and hear grass growing.
Heimdall
He will call the Aesir into battle at Ragnarok with his horn Gjall (or Gjallerhorn).
Heimdall
The fairest of the Aesir, he is the god of light, joy, and beauty. He dreamed of his own death, so Frigga extracted promises from everything not to harm Balder, but she skipped mistletoe.
Balder
Loki tricked his blind brother Hoder into killing him with a spear of mistletoe.
Balder
The goddesses of destiny, represented as the three sisters Urd (or Wyrd), Verdandi (or Verthandi), and Skuld.
Norns
The counterparts of the Greek Fates, they tend the Well of Fate at the roots of Yggdrasil.
Norns
immense mythical fir tree that connects the nine worlds in Norse cosmology.
Yggdrasil
Home of the Norse Gods
Asgard
Earth in Norse myth
Midgard
Giants of Norse myth
Jötunn
God of single-combat and heroic glory; lost a hand to the wolf Fenris in his attempts to shackle the beast successfully.
Tyr
Goddess of the Underworld; daughter of Loki. Known for refusing to return Balder's soul after his death.
Hel
Also known as the World Serpent; a serpent that encircles the earth and signals the coming of Ragnarok. Slain by Thor, but kills him with its venom.
Jormungand
God of the sea, sea-faring, and the wind. Father of Freyr and Freya.
Njord
A dragon that lies at the roots of the World Tree, gnawing through Niflheim. Gnaws through the root at the coming of Ragnarok.
Nidhogg
A giant wolf shackled until Ragnarok by Tyr. Bites off Tyr's hand as he fastens the shackle. Offspring of Loki.
Fenrir
Hall of the Gods in Asgard, where those chosen by Odin to attend Ragnarok feast and fight until the Final Battle.
Valhalla
The Final Battle between the forces of good and evil. Loki leads the Frost Giants againt the Aesir and Vanir. All realms, gods, and goddesses perish except for a select few, heralding a New Age.
Ragnarok
Goddess of the moon and cats; has the head of a cat as well.
Bast
God of the Earth; husband of Nut; one of the first Beings of Creation.
Geb
Goddess of the Sky; Wife of Geb; one of the first Beings of Creation.
Nut
Warrior goddess; protector of pharaohs. Has the head of a lioness.
Sekhmet
This man tamed a creature using a golden bridle and attempted but was not permitted to ride Pegasus to Olympus after such deeds as killing a creature which was part goat, part serpent, and part lion.
Bellerophon
At Borobudur, this god is depicted in the third gallery along with Queen Maya and Maitreya in the Rupadhatu level, the world of forms. The Shri Rudram Chamakam is an extensive hymn dedicated to this god, and the holiest of his temples is Pashupatinath in Nepal.
Shiva
Harihara is the combined form of Vishnu and this god. Bhairava, his destructive form, contrasts with his dancing Nataraja form. His first consort was Sati, and he rides on the bull Nandi wielding a trishula. He drank some poison, making him blue, and has a destructive third eye.
Shiva
One son of this figure was placed in a box and given to the three daughters of Cecrops, and this figure aided Achilles by driving off the river god Axius.
Hephaestus
The Irish god Manannan mac Lir owned one of these named Enbarr that carried his daughter Niamh and her lover Ossian across the sea, while Sir Gawain owned one of these creatures named Gringolet.
Horses
During a nighttime raid, Odysseus and Diomedes brought these creatures belonging to Rhesus back to the Greek camp. Other examples of these animals include two children of Zephyrus which were given to Peleus as a wedding gift, Xanthus and Balius.
Horses
This deity sired one son with the giantess Jarnsaxa, and uses the help of the giantess Grid to defeat Geirrod.
Thor
One of this god's animals is crippled when marrow from its thighbone is drunk by Roskva's brother; as punishment, this god forces Thialfi to become his servant.
Thor
One member of this city kidnapped Chrysippus while teaching him chariot driving, and this city's walls were built by playing music to enchant stones. This city's king Pentheus was ripped to shreds by his mother Agave in a Bacchic frenzy.
Thebes
The saliva of this creature forms the river Ván. He easily breaks Leyding and Dromí after being challenged by the gods to test his strength.
Fenrir
This creature will be killed when Vidarr rips open his mouth by stepping on his lower jaw with a boot consisting of discarded toepieces. His children Sköll and Hati Hródvitnisson chase the sun and the moon around the sky.
Fenrir
This work opens with a king asserting the "lord's right" and his people praying for freedom from oppression and the hard labor of having to build a wall. The protagonist of this work is the son of the goddess Ninsun, and visits Utnapishtim, who is with his wife the only survivor of a great Flood.
Epic of Gilgamesh
The Bull of Heaven is sent to kill one character in this work after he spurns the advances of Ishtar. After the title character's friend the wild-man Enkidu dies in this epic, that character engages on a journey to find the secret of immortality.
Epic of Gilgamesh
At a sanctuary named for this goddess, Spartans would try to steal cheese while others whipped them.
Artemis
This goddess born on Mount Cynthus turned Arethusa into a fountain in order to escape from a river god. King Oeneus forgot to make a sacrifice to this goddess, who released the Calydonian boar.
Artemis
The all-black bull Mnevis was a manifestation of this deity, whose soul was represented by the Bennu bird. The grandfather of Geb and Nut, he fathered Tefnut and is either the husband or father of Hathor.
Ra
In the form of a cat, he repeatedly slays an evil serpent. Riding a barge each night, he would defeat Apep, the demon of darkness, before turning back towards the east. He was sometimes combined with Atum, Horus, or Amun.
Ra
This figure reunites with her father, alternately called Schoeneus or Iasius, in between the two primary myths involving her. After taking an oath, this figure kills the lustful centaurs Rhoikos and Hylaois.
Atalanta
This god's diet consisted entirely of lettuce. He was worshipped at Avaris after becoming patron deity to the Hyksos.
Set
This god defended against serpent attacks in the underworld while helping with the nightly voyage taken by Ra's barge, and his consort was Nephthys. This god stole his nephew's eye while in his battle with Horus, sometime after he dismembered and scattered the fourteen pieces of his brother.
Set
One of these named Kur may have carried off the goddess Ereshkigal. In China, they are called lung and represent yang, and Pliny the Elder claimed that Indian elephants were at war with these.
Dragon
One named Fafnir was slewn by Sigurd, and Cadmus slew one and then sowed its teeth to sprout an army.
Dragon
This son of King Ban was known as the White Knight until he defeated the cowardly Copper Knight and lifted a stone slab to find his true name, after which Dolorous Guard became his castle Joyous Guard.
Lancelot
This man killed Gaheris and Gareth as he rescued a lover from burning at the stake, which later earned him the enmity of their brother Gawain. This man was raised by the Lady of the Lake, and his affair with Elaine of Corbenic produced the knight who eventually found the Holy Grail, Sir Galahad.
Lancelot
This god's wife is the mother of the snowshoe god Ullr. In one story, this god prevents the marriage of his daughter Thrudd by posing a series of riddles to the dwarf Alvis.
Thor
They're not colors, but four of these things demarcate the cardinal directions in Mayan cosmology. One of these objects in Chinese myth dispenses gold coins when shaken.
Tree
The Lady of the Lake trapped Merlin in one of these objects, and one belonging to Donar was destroyed by St. Boniface.
Tree
The Dashavatara consists of ten avatars of this deity, including Narasimha, Krishna, and Rama, and his wife is named Lakshmi. For 10 points, name this member of the Hindu trimurti, the preserver of the universe.
Vishnu
This god owned the Stymphallian Birds and had his son Cycnus killed by Heracles. Heracles managed to injure this god with an arrow in the thigh, and he was held captive in a jar by the Aloadae.
Ares
In Cambodian myth, Hari-hara is a combination of this figure and Hiranya. This figure assumed the name "conquerer of death" when he kicked the demon Yama, and the lingam stone represents his phallus.
Shiva
This god drunk the poison from the world's ocean, Halahala, in order to allow the Devatas to access the immortal nectar, thus giving himself the name Neelakantam. In one story, this deity pacified Kali by climbing under her during her victory dance, and in a more famous story severed the head of an elephant to supplant his son's.
Shiva
A now-lost source relates a story in which this god was pierced by a man's head, leading to a new kenning for the word "sword." This figure visited the islands of Vagasker and Singasteinn to fight another deity in the form of a seal in order to retrieve a necklace.
Heimdall
This deity lives in the so-called "Heavenly Mountain," Himinbjorg, and he also owns the sword Hofund and rides the horse Gulltop. This god is said to have slept with Edda, Amma, and Modir while under the name Rig; those women then gave birth the ancestors of the three races of man, Thrall, Karl, and Jarl.
Heimdall
This golden-toothed son of nine mothers will kill and be killed by Loki after blowing the Gjallarhorn to signal the beginning of Ragnarok. For 10 points, identify this Aesir guardian of the rainbow bridge Bifrost.
Heimdall
Every year, the Greek gods honored the Ethiopian king Memnon by creating a geographical feature composed of this substance. Aphrodite created the first anemone by mixing nectar with this substance. During the Trojan War, Zeus created a rain of this substance to commemorate the death of Sarpedon.
Blood
A scripture about this deity takes the form of a discussion between Maitreya and Parashara, and describes this god rising from the sea inside Brahmanda, an enormous egg. An incarnation of this deity appears to Arjun in the Bhagavad Gita.
Vishnu
During a storm, this man accidentally killed the hospitable king of the Doliones, Cyzicus. He sired twins before abandoning the malodorous isle of Lemnos and its queen, Hypsipyle. This son of Alcimede yoked two bronze-hoofed, fire-breathing bulls and carried a goddess disguised as an old woman across a river.
Jason
He is credited with founding the Isthmian Games, and his story is told in book eleven of the Odys- sey and also in the Iliad. Some sources call him the father of Odysseus, and all accounts give his father as Aeolus. His wife Merope was central to his best-known action, since at his behest she did not perform sacrifices and didn't bury him.
Sisyphus
This followed a rescue of Death by Ares, and resulted in him having to die twice, leading to his punishment. Name this Greek mythological figure dramatized by Camus who repeat- edly rolls a boulder up a hill after it rolls back down each time.
Sisyphus
As this figure's ship sailed, rotten planks were replaced with new ones, leading to a philosophical problem concerning whether the original ship remained.
Theseus
Parts of this man's thighs were left in the underworld after he Pirithous were stuck to magical chairs.
Theseus
He killed a robber who forced victims to conform to the size of his bed named Procrustes.
Theseus
Aided by Ariadne's ball of string, this figure slew the Minotaur in the labyrinth.
Theseus
In some myths he is mentioned as the husband of Hathor and the son of Ra, and he was initially worshipped as a war god.
Horus
He killed many hippopotamuses and crocodiles during many battles that ended when this god won a boat race using a wooden boat compared to his adversary's stone boat.
Horus
This figure once masqueraded as Bolverk to gain access to a substance made after the murder of Kvasir (kuh-VAH-sear).
Odin
One of this deity's sons will avenge his death at Ragnarok using a shoe.
Odin
Glaucus of Corinth was torn apart by his own horses as punishment for angering this deity.
Aphrodite
This figure baked two barley cakes for Charon for a trip to the underworld in an episode where she made her future daughter-in-law fetch wool from deadly golden sheep and sort piles of grains.
Aphrodite
One member of this group killed the inhospitable king Amycus with a single blow to the elbow.
Argonauts
Euphemus joined this group, which fought the Bebryces and dealt with a pair of rocks which repeatedly pulled apart and clashed together.
Argonauts
This group made use of a sacred plank of oak which could talk.
Argonauts
Castor and Pollux joined this larger group, which employed the wings of Calais and Zetes to deal with the Harpies.
Argonauts
Its leader passed King Aeetes's challenges in Colchis and married the sorceress Medea.
Argonauts
This man received shelter after he embraced the legs of Queen Arete of Scheria, the wife of King Alcinous.
Odysseus
Eurymachus attempted to hit this man with a chair after he defeated the beggar Irus.
Odysseus
His men were killed after they ate the cattle of Helios, and the rest of his ships had earlier been destroyed by the (*) Laestrygonians.
Odysseus
After this man arrived at Aeaea, Hermes gave him moly to help him ward off the magic of the witch Circe.
Odysseus
This man was held captive by Calypso before coming home and killing his wife's 108 suitors with his son Telemachus.
Odysseus
For ten points, name this king of Ithaca who spent ten years trying to return to his wife Penelope after the Trojan War.
Odysseus
This god asked his daughter's suitor for alternative names to thirteen words all night until he turned to stone in daylight.
Thor
This god acquired two servants after a farmer's son broke a thigh bone to get marrow.
Thor
This deity's gift of a perfect memory was inherited by his son Aethalides [AA-thuh-LEE-dees], and he aided the fight against Typhon by re-attaching Zeus's tendons.
Hermes
This deity rescued Ares from captivity in a bronze jar and put to sleep the 100 eyes of Hera's watchman Argus in order to slay it.
Thor
In one myth, this figure tries to kill a giant using a large stick, but instead has to carve his way out of the giant's belly. In multiple myths, this figure's son is the first death.
Coyote
This figure is sometimes known as the "Old Man," and in some myths created man by kicking a ball of mud. Several stories about this figure are likewise attributed to Raven.
Coyote
For 10 points, name this trickster figure of several Native American mythological systems.
Coyote
Two of these figures murdered Gilling and his wife and then paid off their victims' son Suttung with the mead of Kvasir.
Dwarves
In one myth, this deity grants his battle axe to a devotee who had earlier beheaded his mother Renuka.
Shiva
This god is sometimes depicted surrounded by flames standing on the dwarf Apasmara in his role as the lord of the dance.
Shiva
This god caught a river goddess in his hair so that she would not destroy the earth as she fell.
Shiva
He is often represented as a phallic structure called the lingam.
Shiva
He drank the poisonous Halahala created during the churning of the Ocean of Milk, causing his throat to turn blue.
Shiva
This god rides the bull Nandi and responded to being blocked at the entrance of his home by cutting off the head of his son Ganesha.
Shiva
Aglauros and Herse went mad and jumped to their deaths after disobeying this deity, who had told the daughters of Cecrops to not open a box that held a boy disguised as a snake.
Athena
That boy was a son of Gaia and Hephaestus even though the latter had tried to rape this goddess instead.
Athena
Marsyas picked up a flute that she (*) invented but eventually discarded because it disfigured her face.
Athena
Homer often refers to this figure as "gray-eyed", and as Mentor, she helps Odysseus leave for the Trojan War and return home to Ithaca.
Athena
In one story, Pirathous and Theseus are trapped in this location by a snakes that tie them to a chair.
The Underworld
One part of this location is ruled by the Cretan Rhadamanthus and another is called the Asphodel Meadows.
The Underworld
Honey-colored saffron clothes were worn by girls dressed as arktoi in the Brauronia, which was a celebration of this deity.
Artemis
This deity ran between Otus and Ephialtes, causing them to kill each other, and in another story, she substituted a deer for Iphigenia in the altar of sacrifice
Artemis
King Oeneus forgot to worship this goddess, who angrily sent the Calydonian boar to ravage the land.
Artemis
After one of her attendants fathered Arcas, she transformed Callisto into a bear, but her most vengeful act was slaughtering the children of Niobe, who insulted her mother Leto.
Artemis
This god was rejected by Marpessa in favor of Idas. This father of Aristaeus blasted a crow's feathers black when it informed him of Coronis' affair, and his misfortune with lovers would continue when Hyacinth was killed by a discus.
Apollo
In one form, this god tears out of a pillar and kills a demon at twilight in a courtyard.
Vishnu
This slayer of Hiranyakashipu has a form that is half-man, half-lion and lives on his snake Adishesha in the milky ocean.
Vishnu
He also took three steps to conquer the three worlds in his form Vamana. In most depictions, this god is holding a mace, lotus, conch, and chakra, and he coerced Amrit from the asuras in the form of the temptress Mohini.
Vishnu
The Dashavatara consists of ten avatars of this deity, including Narasimha, Krishna, and Rama, and his wife is named Lakshmi.
Vishnu
In the form of an eagle, this hero calls upon the god of rain for a torrent of water to escape from an angry fire goddess, from whom this hero earlier receives ten fingernails and toenails filled with fire.
Maui
This hero uses a stone axe to kill Long Eel, or Tuna, for spitting slime at his wife.
Maui
This hero meets his end when some nearby birds break out in laughter, causing the queen of the underworld to wake up while this hero is trying to crawl into her body and gain (*) immortality.
Maui
This husband of Hina uses his grandmother's jawbone and a lasso made of his sister's hair to beat the sun into submission and lengthen the day.
Maui
In another story, he uses a magic hook to fish out some islands in the Pacific Ocean.
Maui
Polynesian folk hero
Maui
He is called Protagonus for being the first-born child of Chaos and Gaia. His union with a mortal bore Hedone.
Eros
The saliva of this creature forms the river Ván.
Fenrir
He easily breaks Leyding and Dromí after being challenged by the gods to test his strength.
Fenrir
This creature will be killed when Vidarr rips open his mouth by stepping on his lower jaw with a boot consisting of discarded toepieces.
Fenrir
This figure's wife once sent a ring to his mother's handmaiden Fulla.
Baldur
Thor killed the dwarf Lit shortly after the giantess Hyrrokkin arrived to help with one of this god's possessions.
Baldur
He lived in the land of "fewest baneful runes," which is home to his hall Breidablik.
Baldur
He sent Draupnir back to Asgard with his brother Hermod, who'd been denied in his petition on this god's behalf by another god disguised as Thokk.
Baldur
This god borrowed a falcon cloak twice, once involving a male deity wearing Brisingamen, and another when retrieving golden apples.
Loki
To make one figure laugh, he tied two ends of a rope (
) to a goat's beard and his own testicles, and he once lost an eating contest with Fire.#Loki
Drinking from this mythological figure's two fountains brought poetic inspiration since the Muses considered both of this figure's Aganippe and Hippocrene fountains to be sacred.
Pegasus
This figure's brother fornicated with Callirrhoe, resulting in the birth of Geryon and Echidna.
Pegasus
That brother, Chrysaor, ruled over Iberia instead of living on Mount Helicon like this figure.
Pegasus
This figure was ordered to ascend a mountain but was attacked by a gadfly sent by Zeus.
Pegasus
He was born after Perseus beheaded Medusa while he later helped slay the Chimera with Bellerophon.
Pegasus
This son of Metion fathered his only child with Naucrate. After his nephew invented a saw from a fish bone, this figure pushed him from an Athenian tower.
Daedalus
These creatures overcame a warrior with impenetrable skin by burying him underneath uprooted trees.
Centaurs
In another story, two of these creatures named Hylaeus and Rhaecus attempted to rape Atalanta.
Centaurs
One of these creatures named Eurytion assaulted Hippodamia during her wedding, which led to a conflict in which they smothered the warrior Caeneus.
Centaurs
This deity committed a crime witnessed by the shepherd Battus, whom this god turned to stone.
Hermes
He fathered the goddess of fortune, Tyche. He rescued Io by defeating the one hundred-eyed Argus. Odysseus was immune to Circe's spells because this god gave him the herb moly.
Hermes
This son of Nephthys is shown as having dominion over nine bows, and his daughter was the goddess of freshness and purification.
Anubis
In the presence of a judge and a scribe, this "Opener of the Ways" operated in the Hall of Ma'at and determined whether the jaws of Ammut or Fields of Peace would be the destination of the dead.
Anubis
According to one myth, this figure kidnapped Anticlea and fathered Odysseus.
Sisyphus
His son was trampled to death by his own horses for dishonoring Aphrodite, and this figure secretly marked the hooves of his cattle to prove the theft of Autolycus.
Sisyphus
He created the Isthmian Games after finding the body of Melicertes, and he received a spring from Asophus for revealing the location of Aegina.
Sisyphus
He once captured the god of death, Thanatos, and he returned from the underworld to reprimand his wife Merope for denying him a proper funeral, then refused to return.
Sisyphus
This goddess was first wooed by her husband when he disguised himself as a cuckoo and hid in her bosom.
Hera
Ixion was condemned to Tartarus for making advances on this goddess who blinded Tiresias after he ruled in favor of women in an argument.
Hera
This goddess placed the eyes of the watchman (*) Argos in her favorite animal, the peacock.
Hera
This goddess refused to allow Leto a place to give birth, sent a gadfly to sting Io, and placed snakes in the crib of Heracles, all out of jealousy over her husband's affairs.
Hera
This god broke the backs of two giants who pushed from under his chair and tried to crush him against the ceiling.
Thor
Although not Demeter, this deity attempted burn away the mortality of a son of Queen Astarte and is often depicted wearing a throne-shaped headdress.
Isis
By creating a snake to bite Ra, this deity learned his secret name.
Isis
He used her magic to create a golden phallus for her deceased husband.
Isis
With the help of her sister Nephthys, she revived her husband by finding and reassembling his chopped-up pieces.
Isis
She gave birth on the Nile River delta to her son, who would later battle Set.
Isis
For 10 points, name this Egyptian goddess, the mother of Horus and wife of Osiris.
Isis
This figure lusted after a youth who was preoccupied with the singer Canens; after being spurned by that youth, Picus, this figure turned him into a woodpecker.
Circe
This mythological figure purified the Argonauts for their murder of Aspyrtus and, out of jealous love for Glaucus, turned Scylla into a monster.
Circe
One of this figure's sons became the father of Italus after accidentally killing his own father with the spine of a stingray.
Circe