74 terms

Paynesville schools flash cards

White = Literary Terms
STUDY
PLAY
Alliteration
The repetition of the same or similar sounds at the beginning of words.
Allusion
Reference to well-known person, place, event, literary work, or work of art.
Analogy
A comparison of two things not completely alike.
Antagonist
A character or force in conflict with the main character in a literary work.
Assonance
The repetition or a pattern of the same vowel sounds in the middle of words.
Climax
The most exciting part of a story.
Conflict
A struggle between two opposing forces.
Internal conflict
A stuggle within a character's mind.
External conflict
Is a struggle between a character and an outside force such as another character, society, or a force of nature.
First person
Point of view when a story is told by a person participating in the story (uses"I"). Can't tell us thoughts of other characters.
Figurative
Expression of an idea creatively, not literally (simile, metaphor, and personification, for example).
Flashback
An account of a conversation, episode, or event that happened before the beginning of the story or at an earlier point.
Foreshadowing
Clues the author provides for events that will occur later in the story.
Hyperbole
Exaggeration
Imagery
Pictures that the author creates with words.
Inference
Making logical guesses using evidence from the text and what you know from experience.
Metaphor
An implied comparison.
Mood
The feeling or atmosphere created by the author that the reader interprets from the story.
Motif
Repeated details or symbols in a story; For example, shadows or images of decay.
Narrative
A story. A narrator is one who is telling the story.
Onomatopoeia
Words that imitate sounds. Oink, Pow, Zip, Splash.
Oxymoron
Two contradictory words close together ( spikey smooth, loud silence).
Personification
Giving human qualities to inanimate objects or abstract ideas.
Plot
The sequence of events in a story (what happens first, then next, then next).
Protagonist
The main character in a literary work.
Satire
Poking fun at a person, philosophy, event, or institution to expose weaknesses and vices.
Sequence
The order of events in a story.
Setting
The time and place of a story.
Simile
A comparison using like or as.
Stanza
A group of lines in a poem. Much like a paragraph in a story.
Style
The way a particular work is written-not what is said but HOW it is said. Depends on the writer's choice of words, tone, and sentence structure.
Symbol/Symbolism
Something that stands for something else or means more than itself.
Theme
The main idea or underlying meaning of a literary work. A theme may be stated or implied.
Third Person limited
Point of view in which the narrator tells only the thoughts and feelings of a single character (uses "he", "she").
Third Person Omniscient
Point of view in which the all-knowing narrator (like God) gives thoughts or and judgments about the characters (uses "he", "she").
Tone
The author's attitude about his or her subject. Is the writer being serious, sarcastic, humorous, sympathetic, etc.
Verse
A single line of poetry, or poetry in general (as opposed to prose).
Voice
The personality that comes across the page (might be the writer's or a fictional character's personality).
THE ELEMENTS OF PLOT
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Exposition
Background information about the characters and the setting ( time and place) of a story.
Inciting Incident
The event that triggers the conflict.
Rising Action
A sequence of events arising from the conflict.
Climax
The turning point or moment greatest suspense.
Falling action
The events which bring the story to a close. Eases the suspense.
Final suspense
One last gripping/shocking moment of tension close to the story's end.
Resolution
The wrapping up of the action/ The revealing of the outcome.
Dramatic
Irony in which the audience or reader knows something that a character or characters don't know. ( I know something you don't know).
Verbal Irony
Irony in which a person purposely says the opposite of what he/she means, and those who hear know that the statement is meant as tongue in cheek.
Situational
Irony
Irony in which a situation turns out the opposite of what is expected.
FACT AND OPINION
A fact is something that can be proven.
Fact- Alabama is near Georgia. Opinion- Pizza is great.
CREDIBILITY
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Purpose
What is the author's purpose in writing this? To inform, entertain, explain, or persuade? What is the author's point of view--pro, con, or neutral?
Authority
What are the author's qualifications to write on this topic? Does he/she quote or use information from experts? Is the information from a reliable publication? Is the information current?
Logic
Can you identify any fallacies of logic? Have important points been omitted? Are any arguments irrelevant?
Bias
Is the author biased or objective? What are the author's affiliations? Does the author use loaded or emotional words in his/her argument?
Evidence
Are the statements fact, opinion, or a combination of both? Does the author provide enough of the right kind of evidence?
Gain
What does the author have to gain from the article? Power? Money? Influence? A promotion?
Rhythm
The repetition of stressed and unstressed syllables.
Rhyme
The repetition at sounds at the end of words.
Speaker
The voice in a poem that talks to a reader.
Extended Metaphor
Carries a comparison through several lines or a whole poem.
Repetition
A word, phrase, or line that is repeated for emphasis and unity.
CONFLICT TYPES
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Human vs Human
Conflict that pits one person against another.
Human vs Nature
A run-in with the forces of nature. On the one hand, it expresses the insignificance of a single human life in the cosmic scheme of things. On the other hand, it tests the limits of a person's strength and will to live.
Human vs Society
The values and customs by which everyone else lives are being challenged. The character may come to an untimely end as a result of his or her own convictions. The character may, on the other hand, bring others around to a sympathetic point of veiw, or it may be decided that society was right after all.
Human vs Self
Internal conflict. Not all conflict involves other people. Sometimes people are their own worst enemies. An internal conflict is a good test of a character's value. Does he give in to temptation or rise above it? Does he demand the most from himself or settle for something less? Does he even bother to struggle? The internal conflicts of a character and how conflicts are resolved are good clues to the character's inner strength.
Human vs Technology
An example might be humans struggling to shut down a computer attempting to take over the world.
Supense
The excitement or tension that readers feel as they wait to find out how a story ends or a conflict is resolved.
Point of View
The method of narration used in a short story, novel, narrative poem, or work of nonfiction.
First person POV
The narrator is a character in the story. (Uses "I").
Third Person POV
The narrative voice is outside the action, not one of the characters (Uses "he"/"she"/"they",etc.).
Third Person Omniscient POV
An all- knowing point of view. Narrator sees into the minds of all characters (uses "he," "she").
Third Person Limited POV
Tells what only one character thinks, feels, and observes (uses "he," "she").
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