43 terms

In a Gallery of Their Own Isolation and Separation (Art and Music)

STUDY
PLAY

Terms in this set (...)

Viva la Vida
is a song by British rock band Coldplay. It was written by all members of the band for their fourth album, Viva la Vida or Death and All His Friends (2008), and was released as the second single from the album. Viva la Vida is Spanish for "Long Live Life" or simply "Live Life".
The lyrics to the song contain historical and Christian references, and the track is built around a looping string section in unison with a digital processed piano, with other layers gradually being added. Chris Martin said that he christened this song and the album "Viva la Vida" - meaning "long live life" or more literally, "the life lives" - after he saw the phrase on a painting by Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. He explained: "She went through a lot of s--t, of course, and then she started a big painting in her house that said 'Viva la Vida.' I just loved the boldness of it." The movie Frida, starring Salma Hayek, is about her life.
Therru's Song
Is from the film tales From Earthsea
The film is based on a combination of plot and character elements from the first four books of Ursula K. Le Guin's Earthsea series (A Wizard of Earthsea, The Tombs of Atuan, The Farthest Shore, and Tehanu), as well as the manga The Journey of Shuna by Hayao Miyazaki. The film's title is named from the collection of short stories, Tales from Earthsea, made in 2001.
Songs of a Wayfarer
is by Gustav Mahler. Mahler wrote the poems and composed the music for the Songs of a Wayfarer in 1883. The first performance of the song cycle was given in Berlin in 1896 by the Dutch singer Anton Sistermans. The score calls for 3 flutes (third doubling piccolo), 2 oboes and English horn, 3 clarinets (third doubling bass clarinet), 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, timpani, bass drum, cymbals, triangle, tam-tam, glockenspiel, harp, strings, and solo voice. Duration is about 15 minutes. The lyrics are in German
Five Man Electric band
Signs was written by Five Man Electrical Band lead singer Les Emmerson, this song is a prescient look at class divisions and property rights. Emmerson wrote the song after taking a road trip on Route 66 in California, where he noticed a plethora of billboards that obscured the beautiful scenery. Signs" was included on their second album in 1970, but not considered single-worthy by their record label, as it didn't fit a standard pop format.
Other Peoples Stories
is from the musical Amour. a musical fantasy with an English book by Jeremy Sams, music by Michel Legrand, and lyrics by Didier Van Cauwelaert, who wrote the original French libretto.
The musical is adapted from the 1943 short story Le Passe-Muraille by Marcel Aymé and set in Paris shortly after World War II. It centers on a shy, unassuming clerk who develops the ability to walk through walls, and who challenges himself to stick to his moral center and change others' lives, and his own, as a result.
Motorcycle Drive By
is a song by Third Eye Blind. Stephan Jenkins, lead singer of Third Eye Blind, wrote this about a girl he met and really liked. He went to see her in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York and realized that things could never work with them. The song isn't about her, it's about him - the reasons he got attached and the things he realized about himself. Jenkins explained that when he went to visit his girlfriend and she dumped him, he had nowhere to go. He just drove around on his motorcycle in the rain, which is why it's called "Motorcycle Drive By."
Get Some Sleep
The refrain of this uptempo, overtly commercial track by Bic Runga is "I believe I might be having fun," and Runga is clearly a girl who is doing that here. An obvious single, it received heavy airplay in her native New Zealand where it was first performed at "a few intimate shows at The Odeon, in Auckland" early in 2002. With a fine blend of electric and acoustic guitars and laid back harmonies, "Get Some Sleep" was a deserved top ten hit in both Ireland and Japan.
Untitled (Cobweb/Crossings)
by Reena Saini Kallat is at the Bhau Daji Lad Museum situated at Jijamata Udyaan (once called the Victoria Gardens) in the natural environment of the zoo, the sculpture has an organic form. While thinking of the museum's history and it's mutating relationship to the city of Mumbai, what occupied my mind are the changing street names; in what manner streets define a city's imagination and how their names speak to us about the people who occupy them.
Self Portrait with Jewish Identity Card
by Felix Nussbaum One of his most famous paintings, "Self-portrait With Jewish Pass," in which he holds an identity card marked "Jew" and wears a yellow star, is an artistically formulated composition, not a literal snapshot. By 1943, when Nussbaum painted "Self-portrait With Jewish Pass," he did not actually carry an ID card or wear a yellow star, but was sequestered in Brussels, where he had moved in 1937 and managed to return in 1940, after escaping from a French concentration camp train. Nussbaum's firm draftsmanship, akin to Germany's 1920s New Objectivity art movement, exemplified by such painters as Otto Dix and Christian Schad, wards off self-pity and sentimentality.
Papilla Estelar
by Remedios Varo, Papilla Estelar features a female seated in a small room that is sucking star stuff into a mill, feeding the processed star stuff to a caged moon. Varo painted Papilla Estelar in 1958 after she fled to Mexico; the art community in Mexico was not welcoming to the European artists. The small space and caged moon creates a sense of being trapped and isolated, perhaps a reflection of how Varo felt in Mexico isolated from her homeland. However, the milled star stuff represents hope and the action of feeding it to the moon is an attempt to transform hope into an opportunity. This painting reminds the viewer of the hope that comes out of trials and that light comes from within and that it is the viewers job to harness it.
Open Border, 2017
by Atelier ARI, Open Border is a long wall, placed perpendicular to the skating trail on the Assiniboine River in Winnipeg, Canada. The red, almost four meter high barrier spans the river, creats a strong border, and is clearly visible in the contrasting white snowy landscape. The double wall is cladded with red insulating strips that keep the cold wind out. The inner walls create a series of interlinked spaces. Skaters and pedestrians can cross the border over the full length. Inside the wall the atmosphere feels warmer, a friendly place that invites people to play and come together.
Open Border responds to the tensed political climate. The completion of the project is at the same that the United States president confirms his plans for the construction of a wall along the Mexican border and choose to drastically close the borders for several Muslim countries.
The project is built nearby The Forks on the Red River Mutual Trail
Office in a Small City
by Edward Hopper. Hopper began Office in a Small City while he was staying in Truro, MA. in the summer of 1953, and he finished it in his New York studio in the fall. Rather than depicting the Cape Cod landscape, however,Office in a Small City is a scene that could have taken place in any American town in the mid-twentieth century. My aim was to try to give the sense of an isolated and lonely office interior rather high in the air, with the office furniture which has a very definite meaning to me.
Hiding in the City- Vegetables
by Liu Bolin. In 2009, Liu extended his silent protest to consumer culture, building supermarkets in his studio and filling their shelves with lines of cheap products. "In a Chinese drink a plasticising agent was found; I have a phobia of supermarket food," he says.
Here We Are (2016)
by Kushana Bush In 'Here we are' New Zealand artist Kushana Bush traverses, in painstaking strokes of gouache, a vast array of sources -- from Mughal miniatures to medieval books of hours and Italian Renaissance painting. In a brocade of figures, color, gesture and pattern, Bush seamlessly infuses historical references with symbols of our contemporary world, blurring temporal, cultural and geographical boundaries so that, contrary to the assertion of the title, exactly where we are is anything but clear-cut.
We can establish that an exchange is taking place between two parties. Hand gestures and facial expressions ricochet from one party to the other, and among their crowded bodies, lie an assortment of offerings - a pair of scissors, a golden skewer, a banana peel, a wristwatch. This scene of marketplace trading — or perhaps, dispute resolution — teems with mixed messages. Yet, its formal values create a distinct sense of coherence; it is at once confused and balanced.
Cold Play
is a British rock band formed in London in 1996. The four members, lead singer and pianist Chris Martin, lead guitarist Jonny Buckland, bassist Guy Berryman, and drummer Will Champion were at University College London, and came together from 1996 to 1998, during which time the band changed names from Pectoralz, to Starfish, then Coldplay. Creative director and former manager Phil Harvey is often referred to as the fifth member by the band. The wrote a British rock band formed in London in 1996.[2][3] The four members, lead singer and pianist Chris Martin, lead guitarist Jonny Buckland, bassist Guy Berryman, and drummer Will Champion were at University College London, and came together from 1996 to 1998, during which time the band changed names from Pectoralz, to Starfish, then Coldplay.[4][5] Creative director and former manager Phil Harvey is often referred to as the fifth member by the band
Earthsea
The crew of a war galley are up against a storm. Suddenly two dragons are fighting above the clouds, during which one is killed by the other (an occurrence believed impossible).
News of the kingdom declining and nothing heard from Prince Arren troubles the King of Elad. The Wizard Root speaks of dragons and men being "one", divided by their particular desires (freedom and possessions respectively), which is the cause of the world's "Balance" weakening. Suddenly the King is fatally stabbed in a dark corridor by his son, Arren, who steals his father's sword and flees the palace while his father dies.
In the desert, Arren is rescued from dire wolves by the Archmage Sparrowhawk. Together they travel to the city of Hort Town. When Arren explores the town alone, he rescues a young girl named Therru from slavers, but is later captured by the same slave master, Hare. His sword is discarded in the sea. Sparrowhawk rescues Arren from the slave caravan and takes him to a farm run by Sparrowhawk's friend Tenar, who lives with Therru.
Gustav Mahler (7 July 1860 - 18 May 1911)
an Austro-Bohemian late-Romantic composer, and one of the leading conductors of his generation. As a composer he acted as a bridge between the 19th century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 his compositions were rediscovered by a new generation of listeners He wrote Songs of a Wayfarer
Five Man Electric band
originally known as The Staccatos from (1963-68) is a Canadian rock group from Ottawa, Ontario. They had many hits in Canada, including the top 10 entries "Half Past Midnight" (1967) (as The Staccatos), "Absolutely Right" (1971) and "I'm a Stranger Here" (1972). Internationally, they are best known for their 1971 hit single "Signs
Amour
The musical is adapted from the 1943 short story Le Passe-Muraille by Marcel Aymé and set in Paris shortly after World War II. It centers on a shy, unassuming clerk who develops the ability to walk through walls, and who challenges himself to stick to his moral center and change others' lives, and his own, as a result. It features An Ordinary Man and Other Peoples Stories
Third Eye Blind
is an American rock band formed in San Francisco in 1993. The songwriting duo of Stephan Jenkins and Kevin Cadogan signed the band's first major-label recording contract with Elektra Records in 1996, which was later reported as the largest publishing deal ever for an unsigned artist. The band released their self-titled debut album in 1997. The band continued, but with many line-up changes and gaps between album releases.
Bic Runga (born 13 January 1976)
Briolette Kah Bic Runga , recording as Bic Runga, is a New Zealand singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist pop artist. Her first three studio albums debuted at number one on the New Zealand Top 40 Album charts. Runga has also found success internationally in Australia, Ireland and the United Kingdom with her song "Sway"
Reena Saini Kalaat (b. 1973, Delhi, India)
practices spanning drawing, photography, sculpture and video using diverse materials. Her work isimbued with conceptual underpinnings. She is interested in the role that memory plays, in not only what we choose to remember but how we think of the past. Using the motif of the rubberstamp both as object and imprint, signifying the bureaucratic apparatus, Kallat has worked with officially recorded or registered names of people, objects, and monuments that are lost or have disappeared without a trace, only to get listed as anonymous and forgotten statistics. In her works made with electrical cables, wires usually serving as conduits of contact that transmit ideas and information, become painstakingly woven entanglements that morph into barbed wires like barriers. Her ongoing series using salt as a medium explores the tenuous yet intrinsic relationship between the body and the oceans, highlighting the fragility and unpredictability of existence.
Felix Nussbaum (11 December 1904 - 9 August 1944)
was a German-Jewish surrealist painter. Nussbaum's artwork gives a rare glimpse into the essence of one individual among the victims of the Holocaust.
Remedios Varo
The visionary lone painter, typically portrays herself sitting at a desk engaged in magical work, embarking on a journey to unlock true meaning, or dissolving completely into the environment that surrounds her. As a well-studied alchemist, seeker, and naturalist, however dreamlike her imagery may appear, it is in fact reality observed more clearly; Varo painted deep, intuitive, and multi-sensory pictures in hope to inspire learning and promote better individual balance in an interconnected universe. Interestingly, and understandably, it was not until the last 13 years of the artist's life, having fled war-torn Europe, found home in Mexico (amongst a community of other displaced Surrealists) and finally become free of ongoing financial constraints that she was able to paint prolifically. Every work completed by Varo demonstrates profound technical skill and an extraordinary insight into human nature.
Atelier ARI
Atelier ARI is a Rotterdam based design office, founded in the summer of 2014. From out of a 19th century school building we design and experiment with a hands-on approach. Being a combination of an artist and architect, we operate in a wide range of spatial design, including public art installations, furniture design, interiors and architecture.
Our work is characterized by clearly organized design, always combined with a twist and much love for craftsmanship and aesthetics. The two principle architects are Joyce de Grauw and Paul van den Berg
Edward Hopper
is widely acknowledged as the most important realist painter of twentieth-century America. But his vision of reality was a selective one, reflecting his own temperament in the empty city scapes, landscapes, and isolated figures he chose to paint. His work demonstrates that realism is not merely a literal or photographic copying of what we see, but an interpretive rendering.
Edward Hopper was born in 1882, in NY, into a middle class family. From 1900 to 1906 he studied at the NY School of Art, and while in school, shifted from illustration to works of fine art. Upon completing his schooling, he worked as an illustrator for a short period of time; once this career path ended, he made three international trips, which had a great influence on the future of his work, and the type of art he would engage in during the course of his career.
Liu Bolin
Liu Bolin is an artist born in China's Shandong province. He earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Shandong College of Arts in 1995 and his Master of Fine Arts from the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing in 2001. His work has been exhibited in museums around the world. Also known as, Liu Bolin's most popular works are from his "Hiding in the City" series; photographic works that began as performance art in 2005. Bolin stands still for hours of body painting so that he vanishes into the background of his pictures, becoming 'the invisible man'. The Chinese artist's camouflage works have won him worldwide attention, with exhibitions around the globe and a TED talk that has garnered more than a million views online
Kushana Bush
Kushana Bush is an artist who lives and works in Dunedin, New Zealand. Her miniature gouache paintings on paper are littered with allusions to Mughal and Persian miniature traditions, Japanese ukiyo-e, as well as medieval European art history.
"...borrowing and adapting imagery, not of my time or place - and crucially, getting it wrong - somehow produces pictures that speak of the here and now. I'm very attracted to that cycle of collapsing interpretations, it keeps you yearning'.
Office in a Small City
Painted by Edward Hopper 1953; suggests the alienation associated with white-collar work and the corporate atmosphere of the 1950s
Hiding in the City - Vegetables
Painted by Liu Bolin in 2011; part of his most popular works,"Hiding in the City" series; photographic works that began as performance art in 2005 (where he stands still for hours until he vanishes into the background of his pictures), when China emerged from the rubble of the Cultural Revolution and was beginning to enjoy rapid economic growth and relative political stability
Papilla Estelar
Painted in 1958 by Remedios Varo Uranga, she was one of the few acknowledged female surrealist painters of the first half of the 20th century. She defied the male dominated artistic world of that era through her unique and peculiar approach to Surrealism because of her multicultural background and upbringing.
Here We Are
Painted in 2016 by , New Zealand artist Kushana Bush explores Mughal miniatures to medieval books of hours and Italian Renaissance painting -- to infuse historical references with symbols of the contemporary world, blurring temporal, cultural and geographical boundaries so that, contrary to the assertion of the title, exactly where we are is anything but clear-cut
Untitled (Cobweb/Crossings)
Created in 2013 in Mumbai by Reena Saini Kallat, this piece was an oversized web made with hundreds of replica rubber stamps that wove a history of the city onto the façade of the Museum, with each stamp bearing a colonial street name that has been replaced by an indigenous one. By recovering the memory of one aspect of the process of decolonization - the renaming of anglicized British street names with Indian or regional ones - the work forms a palimpest on to which generations may re-inscribe stories.
Open Border
Installed by Atelier ARI in 2017, is a porous border through which people can easily cross, surfacing at the same time when Trump has confirmed his plans to construct a wall along the Mexican border and ban the entry of visitors coming from several muslim countries
Self-Portrait with Jewish Identity Card
Painted by Felix Nussbaum in 1943, the artwork gives a rare glimpse into the essence of one individual among the victims of the Holocaust
Reena Saini Kallat
created Untitled (Cobweb/Crossings) in 2013 in the city of Mumbai, India
Songs of a Wayfarer no. 2
part of the song cycle composed by Gustav Mahler on his own texts. The cycle of called for medium voice (often performed by women as well as men) and was written around 1884-85 in the wake of Mahler's unhappy love for soprano Johanna Richter, whom he met conducting the opera house in Kassel, Germany; it was orchestrated and revised in the 1890s
Viva la Vida
also called Death and All His Friends, released by Coldplay in 2008, Frontman Chris Martin told Rolling Stone that he christened this song and the album - meaning "long live life" or more literally, "the life lives" - after he saw the phrase on a painting by Mexican artist Frida Kahlo
Therru's Song
Released in 2006 by Aoi Teshima, this was a soundtrack from the Japanese movie Tales from Earthsea, in which a powerful wizard named Sparrowhawk seeks the source of his world's imbalance, and along the way rescues a runaway prince named Arren
Signs
Best known international single released in 1970 by Five Man Electrical Band, a Canadian rock group from Ottawa, Ontario; centered on societal oppression, going against the rules, law, and government
Other People's Stories and An Ordinary Guy
songs from the 1997 musical fantasy Amour, which centers on a shy, unassuming clerk who develops the ability to walk through walls, and who challenges himself to stick to his moral center and change others' lives, and his own, as a result.
Get Some Sleep
recorded by Bic Runga in June 2002, a New Zealand singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist pop artist, this song was inspired by her recent 2-year touring of the US, in which the refrain of the uptempo continuously repeats "I believe I might be having fun" - which she clearly is
Motorcycle Drive By
Stephan Jenkins, lead singer of Third Eye Blind, wrote this about a girl he met and really liked. He went to see her in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York and realized that things could never work with them. The song isn't about her, it's about him - the reasons he got attached and the things he realized about himself. Jenkins explained that when he went to visit his girlfriend and she dumped him, he had nowhere to go. He just drove around on his motorcycle in the rain, which is why it's called "Motorcycle Drive By."