Bone marking types

Learning specific bone markings in the skeleton is MUCH easier if you know what the types of bone markings are before you begin. (From Patton ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY textbook, (c) Elsevier Publishing, used by permission)
STUDY
PLAY
Angle
A corner
Body
The main portion of a bone
Condyle
Rounded bump; usually fits into a fossa on another bone to form a joint
Crest
Moderately raised ridge; generally a site for muscle attachment
Epicondyle
Bump near a condyle; often gives the appearance of a "bump on a bump"; for muscle attachment
Facet
Flat surface that forms a joint with another facet or flat bone
Fissure
Long, cracklike hole for blood vessels and nerves
Foramen
Round hole for vessels and nerves (pl., foramina)
Fossa
Depression; often receives an articulating bone (pl., fossae)
Head
Distinct epiphysis on a long bone, separated from the shaft by a narrowed portion (or neck)
Line
Similar to a crest but not raised as much (is often rather faint)
Margin
Edge of a flat bone or flat portion of the edge of a flat area
Meatus
Tubelike opening or channel (pl., meatus or meatuses)
Neck
A narrowed portion, usually at the base of a head
Notch
A V-like depression in the margin or edge of a flat area
Process
A raised area or projection
Ramus
Curved portion of a bone, like a ram's horn (pl., rami)
Sinus
Cavity within a bone
Spine
Similar to a crest but raised more; a sharp, pointed process; for muscle attachment
Sulcus
Groove or elongated depression (pl., sulci)
Trochanter
Large bump for muscle attachment (larger than a tubercle or tuberosity)
Tuberosity
Oblong, raised bump, usually for muscle attachment; also called a tuber; a small tuberosity is called a tubercle