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25 terms

Literary Terms: Tier 3

These are advanced terms which would be wonderful for everyone to know. They are the icing on the cake of your analysis (sweet, but not necessary in order to have good cake). Enjoy!
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apostrophe
the direct address to a deceased or absent person as if he or she were present, to an animal or thing, or an artistic idea or quality
malapropism
an unconscious error in speech or writing on a part of a character which is deliberate on the part of the author; result from substituting one word for another with a similar sound but entirely different meaning
apposition
pairs of complementary ideas
antithesis
pairs of contrasting ideas
litotes
esp. important in satire; a figure of speech consisting of an understatement in which an affirmative is expressed by negating its opposite
ellipsis
omission (done deliberately, for effect)
asyndeton
omission of conjunctions in a series
polysyndeton
use of multiple conjunctions in a series
anaphora
repetition of word(s) at the beginning of several successive verses, clauses, or paragraphs
epistrophe
repetition of the same word(s) at the end of successive clauses
epanalepsis
use of the same word at the start and the end of a clause
anadiplosis
use of the last word on one clause for the start of the next clause
antimetabole
repetition of words in successive clauses, in reverse grammatical order
chiasmus
reversal of grammatical structures in successive phrases or clauses
polyptoton
repetition of words from the same root in different forms, cases, numbers, genders, etc.
caesura
a midline pause in a line of verse
epizeuxis
immediately repeating a word to give it greater impact
parison
repeating an entire sentence or clause almost exactly
ploce
repeating words in a line or clause
atanaclasis
punning on a repeated word to obtain different meanings
bombast
boastful or ranting language (adj. form: bombastic)
fricative
consonant made by the friction of breath in a narrow opening, producing a turbulent airflow (f, th)
plosive
consonant produced by stopping the airflow using lips, teeth, or palate, followed by a sudden release of air (voiceless--t, k, p; voiced--d, g, b
parataxis
placing of phrases/clauses, one after another, without words to indicate coordination or subordination
hypotaxis
the subordination of one clause to another