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73 terms

APUSH Vocab

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Progressivism
the political orientation of those who favor progress toward better conditions in government and society
Enlightenment
the Enlightenment, a philosophical movement of the 18th century, characterized by belief in the power of human reason and by innovations in political, religious, and educational doctrine.
Antebellum
A descriptive term for objects and institutions, especially houses, that originated three or four decades before the Civil War
Fundamentalism
a movement in American Protestantism that arose in the early part of the 20th century in reaction to modernism and that stresses the infallibility of the Bible not only in matters of faith and morals but also as a literal historical record, holding as essential to Christian faith belief in such doctrines as the creation of the world, the virgin birth, physical resurrection, atonement by the sacrificial death of Christ, and the Second Coming.
Acquiescent
willing to carry out the orders or wishes of another without protest
Ingratiate
to establish (oneself) in the favor or good graces of others, esp. by deliberate effort
Staunchly
Firm and steadfast; true
Pacifist
a person who believes in pacifism or is opposed to war or to violence of any kind.
Curmudgeon
a bad-tempered, difficult, cantankerous person.
Nationalism
national spirit or aspirations.
Suffrage
the right to vote, esp. in a political election.
Isolationism
the policy or doctrine of isolating one's country from the affairs of other nations by declining to enter into alliances, foreign economic commitments, international agreements, etc., seeking to devote the entire efforts of one's country to its own advancement and remain at peace by avoiding foreign entanglements and responsibilities.
Subsidy
a sum paid, often in accordance with a treaty, by one government to another to secure some service in return.
Internment
the state of being interned; confinement.
Coalition
a union into one body or mass; fusion.
Flux
a flowing or flow
Burgeoning
To grow or develop rapidly.
Voluntarism
ny policy or practice based on voluntary action.
Evangelicals
Characterized by ardent or crusading enthusiasm
Provincial
Limited in perspective; narrow and self-centered.
Egalitarian
asserting, resulting from, or characterized by belief in the equality of all people, esp. in political, economic, or social life.
Expatriates
To remove (oneself) from residence in one's native land.
Mercantilism
mercantile practices or spirit; commercialism.
Imperialism
he policy of extending the rule or authority of an empire or nation over foreign countries, or of acquiring and holding colonies and dependencies.
Commerce
an interchange of goods or commodities, esp. on a large scale between different countries (foreign commerce) or between different parts of the same country (domestic commerce); trade; business.
Intrastate
existing or occurring within the boundaries of a state, esp. of the United States: intrastate commerce.
Nullification
(often initial capital letter) the failure or refusal of a U.S. state to aid in enforcement of federal laws within its limits, esp. on Constitutional grounds
Utopian ism
The ideals or principles of a utopian; idealistic and impractical social theory.
Capitalist
A supporter of capitalism.
Patronage
The trade given to a commercial establishment by its customers
Annex
. to attach, append, or add, esp. to something larger or more important.
Mystique
a framework of doctrines, ideas, beliefs, or the like, constructed around a person or object, endowing the person or object with enhanced value or profound meaning
Methodism
# The beliefs, worship, and system of organization of the Methodists. # methodism Emphasis on systematic procedure
Vigilantism
any person who takes the law into his or her own hands, as by avenging a crime.
Embargo
an order of a government prohibiting the movement of merchant ships into or out of its ports.
Yeoman
a servant, attendant, or subordinate official in a royal or other great household.
Escalation
to increase in intensity, magnitude, etc.: to escalate a war; a time when prices escalate.
Insurgency
rebellion within a group, as by members against leaders
Interstate
connecting or involving different states: interstate commerce.
Laissez faire
economic ideology which advocates minimal state intervention on the economy.
Socialism
a theory or system of social organization that advocates the vesting of the ownership and control of the means of production and distribution, of capital, land, etc., in the community as a whole.
Enfranchise
1. to grant a franchise to; admit to citizenship, esp. to the right of voting.
Romanticism
often Romanticism An artistic and intellectual movement originating in Europe in the late 18th century and characterized by a heightened interest in nature, emphasis on the individual's expression of emotion and imagination, departure from the attitudes and forms of classicism, and rebellion against established social rules and conventions.
Belligerent
of warlike character; aggressively hostile;
Conscription
compulsory enrollment of persons for military or naval service; draft
Trust
A Trust is an entity created to hold assets for the benefit of certain persons or entities, with a trustee managing the trust (and often holding title on behalf of the trust)
Sovereignty
rightful status, independence, or prerogative.
Electorate
the body of persons entitled to vote in an election.
Dismal
causing gloom or dejection;
Populism
(lowercase) any of various, often antiestablishment or anti-intellectual political movements or philosophies that offer unorthodox solutions or policies and appeal to the common person rather than according with traditional party or partisan ideologies.
Vindicate
to afford justification for; justify:
Idiom
The specific grammatical, syntactic, and structural character of a given language.
Labor Union
an organization of wage earners or salaried employees for mutual aid and protection and for dealing collectively with employers; trade union.
Alienation
the state of being withdrawn or isolated from the objective world, as through indifference or disaffection.
Dissenter
One who refuses to accept the doctrines or usages of an established or a national church, especially a Protestant who dissents from the Church of England.
Sectional
pertaining or limited to a particular section; local or regional:
Realism
the tendency to view or represent things as they really are.
Fraudulent
given to or using fraud, as a person; cheating; dishonest.
Collective Bargaining
the process by which wages, hours, rules, and working conditions are negotiated and agreed upon by a union with an employer for all the employees collectively whom it represents
Zealous
ardently active, devoted, or diligent.
Gentry
an upper or ruling class; aristocracy.
Communism
a theory or system of social organization based on the holding of all property in common, actual ownership being ascribed to the community as a whole or to the state.
Exacerbate
o embitter the feelings of (a person); irritate; exasperate.
Stagnation
state of inactivity (in business or art etc); "economic growth of less than 1% per year is considered to be economic stagnation"
Excise
an internal tax or duty on certain commodities, as liquor or tobacco, levied on their manufacture, sale, or consumption within the country.
Agrarian
relating to land, land tenure, or the division of landed property: agrarian laws.
Vaudeville
theatrical piece of light or amusing character, interspersed with songs and dances.
Militarist
a person skilled in the conduct of war and military affairs.
Steadfast
irm in purpose, resolution, faith, attachment, etc., as a person:
Detente
a relaxing of tension, esp. between nations, as by negotiations or agreements
Bimetallic
pertaining to a monetary system based on two metals; "in a bimetallistic system both gold and silver can constitute legal tender
Reactionary
Characterized by reaction, especially opposition to progress or liberalism; extremely conservative.
Culminate
to end or arrive at a final stage