Terms in this set (11)

Republicans reacted to the end of Reconstruction by splitting in two. The Liberal Republicans broke off from the Republican Party as a result of the depression and rising criticism of postwar activist government. They were led by influential intellectuals, journalists, and businessman who believed in classical liberalism free trade, small government, low property taxes, and limitation of voting rights to men of education and property. They urged a policy of laissez faire, in which government "let alone" business and the economy. Unable to block Grant's renomination for the presidency in 1872, they broke away and formed a new party. Their candidate was Horace Greeley, a veteran reformer and abolitionists. Grant won reelection, but they had shifted the terms of debate. The agenda they advanced - smaller government, restricted voting rights, and reconciliation with ex-Confederates - resonated with Democrats. These Liberal Republicans were also known as classical liberals. They claimed that freedmen were unfit to vote. Ex-Confederates in the South seized power. They mostly believed that Reconstruction governments were illegitimate "regimes," and led by the planters, they staged a massive insurgency to take back the South. They viewed the end of Reconstruction as an opportunity to reclaim power. They seized power both through the ballot box and force, ending Reconstruction through paramilitary groups that terrorized Republicans, killing political leaders. This movement was called "Redemption." Freedpeople obviously were unhappy with the end of Reconstruction, but there was nothing they could do. Northerners were prioritizing the economy over civil rights and the rise of the KKK and the Democratic Party in the South ended Reconstruction.
Reconstruction faltered following Charles Sumner's death. Sumner's death marked the waning of Radical Reconstruction A chasm had opened between the goals of freedmen, who wanted autonomy, and policymakers, whose first priorities were to reincorporate ex-Confederates into the nation and build a powerful national economy. In the South, Redeemers used violence to overthrow Reconstruction governments. These Southern Democrats mostly believed that Reconstruction governments were illegitimate "regimes," and led by the planters, they staged a massive insurgency to take back the South. They viewed the end of Reconstruction as an opportunity to reclaim power. They seized power both through the ballot box and force, ending Reconstruction through paramilitary groups that terrorized Republicans, killing political leaders. In the North, Liberal Republicans caused a split in the Republican Party. They were led by influential intellectuals, journalists, and businessman who believed in classical liberalism free trade, small government, low property taxes, and limitation of voting rights to men of education and property. They urged a policy of laissez faire, in which government "let alone" business and the economy. Unable to block Grant's renomination for the presidency in 1872, they broke away and formed a new party. The agenda they advanced - smaller government, restricted voting rights, and reconciliation with ex-Confederates - resonated with Democrats. The scandals in the Grant administration and the economic depression also weakened the nation and Reconstruction.
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