10 terms

- Lord of the Flies- Chapter 8 -

This is a set of flashcards for Questions and Answers for Chapter 8 that you may use to study for the upcoming WRITTEN Unit Exam.
STUDY
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1. How does Jack respond when Ralph calls his hunters "boys armed with sticks?"
In "Lord of the Flies" when Ralph calls Jack's hunters "boys armed with sticks" Jack becomes very offended and returns to his friends to twist Ralph's words, claiming that he called the hunters cowards. Jack also believes Ralph is not a proper chief.
2. What does Jack do when the boys do not respond to his demand to be chief?
When Jack asked the assembly in chapter 8: Gift for the Darkness to raise their hands if they no longer wanted Ralph to be chief no boys raised their hands. Jack was deeply upset and told the boys, and I quote... "I'm not going to play any longer. Not with you." He also added, "I'm going off by myself. He can catch his own pigs. Anyone who wants to hunt when I do can come too." Then Jack leapt down from the platform and ran off along the beach, alone.
3. Why does Simon suggest they go back to the mountains?
Simon suggested it because, in his own words, "What else is there to do?" Simon could not bring himself to believe in the existence of a winged creature with teeth and claws that was unable to catch Samneric. To Simon the whole story made no sense and the only sensible option was to go to the mountain and discover just exactly what it was that Samneric had really seen.
4. What does Piggy suggest they do, since they can't return to the mountain to build a fire?
Piggy suggests that since they can not have a fire on the mountain they should have it on the beach
5. What happens to most of the Biguns while Ralph and Piggy are busy?
Piggy was getting the names of the littluns, while Ralph was busy getting everyone's attention. Once the attention was turned towards him, he was interrupted by the wannabe leader Jack, who said that they need to be rescued.
6. What gift does Jack offer to help pacify the Beast?
Jack offers the sow's head, him and and his hunters had killed.
7. What does Jack ask Roger to do to a stick?
He tells him to "sharpen a stick at both ends." This may symbolize that what was previously there (one side of law/order/good, etc. and the other side of chaos/savagery/evil, etc), has now been replaced by just the side of chaos/savagery/evil... Hence the stick being sharpened at "both ends."
8. How does Jack use the idea of the Beast to control and direct the boys in his tribe?
I feel that Jack uses the idea of the beast to control his tribe by assuring everyone that the existence of the beast was true. By saying this, the members of Jack's tribe will thus be willing to obey him and as I have mentioned in my earlier posts, be willing to cast aside all their discontentment about Jack's arrogant and barbaric behavior for the sake of their own safety.

The more the members of Jack's tribe believe in the existence of the beast, the more they are manipulated by Jack as he gains more and more control over his tribe. Also, to further boost his status as a chief, he then challenges Ralph to hunt the beast at night, weakening Ralph's role as a leader as Jack called him a coward when he had hesitated. When they hunted for the beast at night, the dead parachutist was then mistaken for the beast by both Ralph and Jack, "confirming" the littluns' fear regarding the existence of the beast and had thus indirectly enabled Jack to gain more influence over his tribe.

All in all, Jack uses the idea of the beast to control and direct the boys in his tribe by confirming the beast's existence and from there, control them by claiming that he would protect them from the "beast" if they obeyed him and followed him.
9. What is "The Lord of the Flies?" (I am not asking you about the title of the book).
Pigs Head
10. Why does Golding have Simon "communicate" with the Lord of the Flies? Consider what Simon's character might represent in the novel.
-Golding chooses Simon to communicate because Simon is a neutral character in Lord of the Flies and is naturally good as a person.