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DiSanto studies women sexuality and sexual adaptations following treatment for breast cancer. Study participants were 23 women with breast cancer who had had either a lumpectomy or mastectomy within the prior 24 months. All had received adjuvant chemotherapy. In-depth interviews that lasted between 60-90 minutes were conducted in participants' homes. The participants were asked to describe how their breast cancer had affected their sexuality and how cancer and cancer treatment had affected their role performance, self-image, and sexual functioning. They also were asked when these changes had occurred and what strategies had been used in managing them. Constant comparison was used with transcribed interviews, and emerging categories guided subsequent questioning and the selection of participants. Line-by-pine coding was performed by DiSanto herself, facilitated but the use of the computer software NVivo. After coding was completed, categories and their properties were identified from the data through the process of axial coding. Then, links were made to subcategories by relational statements. Development of a story line helped to organize the categories, which in turn led to identification of an explanation of the sexuality issues confronting women as a result of breast cancer treatment, factors that either hinder or facilitate this process, and the stages in the process. The social psychological process was Adapting to an Altered Sexual Self. The process of adjustment was a three-stage process: taking it all in, taking hold of the reality of the altered self, and taking it on.

What was the tradition underlying this research?
DiSanto studies women sexuality and sexual adaptations following treatment for breast cancer. Study participants were 23 women with breast cancer who had had either a lumpectomy or mastectomy within the prior 24 months. All had received adjuvant chemotherapy. In-depth interviews that lasted between 60-90 minutes were conducted in participants' homes. The participants were asked to describe how their breast cancer had affected their sexuality and how cancer and cancer treatment had affected their role performance, self-image, and sexual functioning. They also were asked when these changes had occurred and what strategies had been used in managing them. Constant comparison was used with transcribed interviews, and emerging categories guided subsequent questioning and the selection of participants. Line-by-pine coding was performed by DiSanto herself, facilitated but the use of the computer software NVivo. After coding was completed, categories and their properties were identified from the data through the process of axial coding. Then, links were made to subcategories by relational statements. Development of a story line helped to organize the categories, which in turn led to identification of an explanation of the sexuality issues confronting women as a result of breast cancer treatment, factors that either hinder or facilitate this process, and the stages in the process. The social psychological process was Adapting to an Altered Sexual Self. The process of adjustment was a three-stage process: taking it all in, taking hold of the reality of the altered self, and taking it on.

Did DiSanto use CAQDAS?
DiSanto studies women sexuality and sexual adaptations following treatment for breast cancer. Study participants were 23 women with breast cancer who had had either a lumpectomy or mastectomy within the prior 24 months. All had received adjuvant chemotherapy. In-depth interviews that lasted between 60-90 minutes were conducted in participants' homes. The participants were asked to describe how their breast cancer had affected their sexuality and how cancer and cancer treatment had affected their role performance, self-image, and sexual functioning. They also were asked when these changes had occurred and what strategies had been used in managing them. Constant comparison was used with transcribed interviews, and emerging categories guided subsequent questioning and the selection of participants. Line-by-pine coding was performed by DiSanto herself, facilitated but the use of the computer software NVivo. After coding was completed, categories and their properties were identified from the data through the process of axial coding. Then, links were made to subcategories by relational statements. Development of a story line helped to organize the categories, which in turn led to identification of an explanation of the sexuality issues confronting women as a result of breast cancer treatment, factors that either hinder or facilitate this process, and the stages in the process. The social psychological process was Adapting to an Altered Sexual Self. The process of adjustment was a three-stage process: taking it all in, taking hold of the reality of the altered self, and taking it on.

Whose methodological approach did DiSanto follow?
DiSanto studies women sexuality and sexual adaptations following treatment for breast cancer. Study participants were 23 women with breast cancer who had had either a lumpectomy or mastectomy within the prior 24 months. All had received adjuvant chemotherapy. In-depth interviews that lasted between 60-90 minutes were conducted in participants' homes. The participants were asked to describe how their breast cancer had affected their sexuality and how cancer and cancer treatment had affected their role performance, self-image, and sexual functioning. They also were asked when these changes had occurred and what strategies had been used in managing them. Constant comparison was used with transcribed interviews, and emerging categories guided subsequent questioning and the selection of participants. Line-by-pine coding was performed by DiSanto herself, facilitated but the use of the computer software NVivo. After coding was completed, categories and their properties were identified from the data through the process of axial coding. Then, links were made to subcategories by relational statements. Development of a story line helped to organize the categories, which in turn led to identification of an explanation of the sexuality issues confronting women as a result of breast cancer treatment, factors that either hinder or facilitate this process, and the stages in the process. The social psychological process was Adapting to an Altered Sexual Self. The process of adjustment was a three-stage process: taking it all in, taking hold of the reality of the altered self, and taking it on.

Was this data analysis method appropriate for the tradition?
DiSanto studies women sexuality and sexual adaptations following treatment for breast cancer. Study participants were 23 women with breast cancer who had had either a lumpectomy or mastectomy within the prior 24 months. All had received adjuvant chemotherapy. In-depth interviews that lasted between 60-90 minutes were conducted in participants' homes. The participants were asked to describe how their breast cancer had affected their sexuality and how cancer and cancer treatment had affected their role performance, self-image, and sexual functioning. They also were asked when these changes had occurred and what strategies had been used in managing them. Constant comparison was used with transcribed interviews, and emerging categories guided subsequent questioning and the selection of participants. Line-by-pine coding was performed by DiSanto herself, facilitated but the use of the computer software NVivo. After coding was completed, categories and their properties were identified from the data through the process of axial coding. Then, links were made to subcategories by relational statements. Development of a story line helped to organize the categories, which in turn led to identification of an explanation of the sexuality issues confronting women as a result of breast cancer treatment, factors that either hinder or facilitate this process, and the stages in the process. The social psychological process was Adapting to an Altered Sexual Self. The process of adjustment was a three-stage process: taking it all in, taking hold of the reality of the altered self, and taking it on.

Did DiSanto use any metaphors in her analysis and interpretation?
DiSanto studies women sexuality and sexual adaptations following treatment for breast cancer. Study participants were 23 women with breast cancer who had had either a lumpectomy or mastectomy within the prior 24 months. All had received adjuvant chemotherapy. In-depth interviews that lasted between 60-90 minutes were conducted in participants' homes. The participants were asked to describe how their breast cancer had affected their sexuality and how cancer and cancer treatment had affected their role performance, self-image, and sexual functioning. They also were asked when these changes had occurred and what strategies had been used in managing them. Constant comparison was used with transcribed interviews, and emerging categories guided subsequent questioning and the selection of participants. Line-by-pine coding was performed by DiSanto herself, facilitated but the use of the computer software NVivo. After coding was completed, categories and their properties were identified from the data through the process of axial coding. Then, links were made to subcategories by relational statements. Development of a story line helped to organize the categories, which in turn led to identification of an explanation of the sexuality issues confronting women as a result of breast cancer treatment, factors that either hinder or facilitate this process, and the stages in the process. The social psychological process was Adapting to an Altered Sexual Self. The process of adjustment was a three-stage process: taking it all in, taking hold of the reality of the altered self, and taking it on.

Did DiSanto's analysis reveal a BSP?