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Public speaking - Chapter 15

STUDY
PLAY
persuasion
the process of creating, reinforcing, or changing people's beliefs or actions
mental dialogue with the audience
the mental give-and-take between speaker and listener during a persuasive speech
target audience
the portion of the whole audience that the speaker most wants to persuade
question of fact
a question about the truth or falsity of an assertion
question of value
a question about the worth, rightness, morality, and so forth of an idea or action
question of policy
a question about whether a specific course of action should or should not be taken
speech to gain passive agreement
a persuasive speech in which the speaker's goal is to convince the audience that a given policy is desirable without encouraging the audience to take action in support of the policy
speech to gain immediate action
a persuasive speech in which the speaker's goal is to convince the audience to take action in support of a given policy
need
the first basic issue in analyzing a question of policy: Is there a serious problem or need that requires a change from current policy?
burden of proof
the obligation facing a persuasive speaker to prove that a change from current policy is necessary
plan
the second basic issue in analyzing a question of policy: If there is a problem with current policy, does the speaker have a plan to solve the problem?
practicality
the third basic issue in analyzing a question of policy: Will the speaker's plan solve the problem? Will it create new and more serious problems?
problem-solution order
a method of organizing persuasive speeches in which the first main point deals with the existence of a problem and the second main point presents a solution to the problem
problem-cause-solution order
a method of organizing persuasive speeches in which the first main point identifies a problem, the second main point analyzes the causes of the problem, and the third main point presents a solution to the problem
comparative advantages order
a method of organizing persuasive speeches in which each main point explains why a speaker's solution to a problem is preferable to other proposed solutions
Monroe's motivated sequence
a method of organizing persuasive speeches that seek immediate action: the five steps of the motivated sequence are attention, need, satisfaction, visualization, and action