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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. New York Times v. Sullivan (1964)
  2. Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, KA (1954)
  3. Schenck v. U.S. (1919)
  4. Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)
  5. Reno v. ACLU (1996)
  1. a The Sixth Amendment 's guarantee of counsel is a fundamental right, and through the Due Process Clause of the 14th Amendment, this made it applicable to states, which now had to provide an attorney if a defendant couldn't afford one.
  2. b Federal law designed to prohibit "indecency" on the internet was unconstitutional.
  3. c Segregation in SCHOOLS is a violation of the 14th amendment, because separate is inherently unequal. This was the beginning of the end for all forms of state-maintained racial separation.
  4. d Libel case-writer did it with intent to defame-knew it was false-wrote it with malicious intent. Public officials/figures have less privacy rights.
  5. e Congress has the right to prohibit speech that causes a "clear and present danger." During wartime, utterances tolerable in peacetime can be punished.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. Regulating interstate commerce is a power reserved to the federal government. Established the importance of Congress' Commerce Clause.
  2. Outlawed Missouri Compromise. Denial of slavery was a 5th amendment property violation. Because African-Americans were NOT considered citizens, they were not protected.
  3. NO racial gerrymandering; race cannot be the sole or predominant factor in redrawing legislative boundaries; majority-minority districts.
  4. Abortion rights fall within the privacy implied in the 14th amendment; established the three trimester standard for abortion procedures.
  5. This established a three-part test by which governments can determine if their actions violate the Establishment Clause of the constitution: is the Law clearly secular, does neither prohibit nor inhibit religion, and is there excessive gov't. entanglement.

5 True/False questions

  1. Miller v. California (1973)Ruled that obscene materials did not enjoy First Amendment protection. Modified the test for obscenity, holding that "[t]he basic guidelines for the trier of fact must be: (a) whether 'the average person, applying contemporary community standards' would find that the work, taken as a whole, appeals to the prurient interest. . . (b) whether the work depicts or describes, in a patently offensive way, sexual conduct specifically defined by the applicable state law; and (c) whether the work, taken as a whole, lacks serious literary, artistic, political, or scientific value."

          

  2. Gregg v. Georgia (1976)Death penalty is not "cruel and unusual punishment" in extreme cases such as murder.

          

  3. Palko v. Connecticut (1937)The court determined that although the Constitution does not explicitly protect a general right to privacy, collectively the 1st, 3rd, 4th and 9th Amendments create a penumbras that do imply a protected right to privacy in the U.S. Constitution.

          

  4. Griswold v. Connecticut (1965)The court determined that although the Constitution does not explicitly protect a general right to privacy, collectively the 1st, 3rd, 4th and 9th Amendments create a penumbras that do imply a protected right to privacy in the U.S. Constitution.

          

  5. Miranda v. Arizona (1966)Applied the exclusionary rule (evidence seized illegally cannot be used in court) to the state courts.