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Terms in this set (96)

Glycolysis takes place in the cytosol (cytoplasm).
The citric acid cycle takes place in the matrix of the mitochondrion.
Oxidative phosphorylation also takes place in the inner matrix of the mitochondrion.
The role of oxygen: Electrons go through the electron transport chain and end up on oxygen, which creates water.


Glycolysis is the process in which:
One glucose molecule is converted to two, 3-carbon molecules. (This uses 2 ATP, and produces 4 ATP and 2 NADH.)
After glycolysis (but before the citric acid cycle), each 3-carbon molecule is converted to Acetyl CoA. (This produces 2 CO2 and 2 NADH.) This takes place in the matrix of the mitochondria.

The citric acid cycle takes place in the matrix of the mitochondria. Electrons from Acetyl CoA are put onto NADH and FADH2. Each Acetyl CoA yields 1 ATP, 3 NADH, 1 FADH2, and 2CO2. Because there are two Acetyl CoA's, that means that 2 ATP, 6 NADH, 2 FADH2, and 4 CO2 are produced in this part of the process.

Oxidative phosphorylation relies on the electron transport chain, which is located in the inner matrix of the mitochondrion. In oxidative phosphorylation, NADH and FADH2 deliver electrons to the electron transport chain.
Electrons flow along the electron transport chain.
Electrons ultimately end on oxygen to produce water.
The passing of electrons between carriers creates energy (through redox reactions).
Energy from the passing of electrons is used to pump H+ gradients against the concentration gradient (electrochemical gradient).
There are more H+ in the intermembrane space (above the membrane) than in the matrix.
H+ are pumped from the matrix (low H+) to the intermembrane space (high H+). This pumping against the electrochemical gradient requires energy.
From the intermembrane space, protons are passed back into the matrix via a channel called ATP synthase. This passing back of the electrons produces energy, which is used to produce ATP.