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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. How are nerve impulses transmitted across synapses? Compare this to transmission of an impulse from nerve fiber to muscle fiber. Is transmission of the impulse across a synapse one-way? What role does calcium play in the release of a neurotransmitter?
  2. Describe the importance of the Schwann cells in regeneration of the nerve fiber following injury.
  3. How does nerve tissue respond to injury? What cells are responsible for the repair? Where can it occur?
  4. Define excitability. What kinds of cells possess excitability?
  5. What is the refractory period (absolute and relative)? What are the ligand gated channels doing at this time?
  1. a In CNS, it doesn't heal.
    In PNS, if mylineation cells are still in tact, they will reform a path for the neuron to grow.
    Schwann Cells or Oligodendricites
  2. b Absolute Refractory Period - complete insensitivity exists to another stimulus. Voltage gated Na+ Channels open and close.
    Relative Refractory Period - follows the absolute period, membrane is more permeable to K+ because many voltage gated K+ channels are open.
  3. c Through Neurotransmitters
    Yes
    Calcium has to go into the synapse to stimulate the vessels to open.
  4. d Schwann cells can point the neuron in the right direction so it can regrow to the proper receptor sites.
  5. e Able to receive impulse from action potentials
    Contractible cells

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. Type A - large-diameter, myelinated. Conduct at 15-120 m/s. Motor neurons supplying skeletal and most sensory neurons
    Type B - medium-diameter, lightly myelinated. Conduct at 3-15 m/s. Part of ANS
    Type C - small-diameter, unmyelinated. Conduct at 2 m/s or less. Part of ANS
  2. In order to get back to polarization, they have to pump in 3 Na out, 2 K in
  3. Channels that are somehow opened to allow specific ions to enter and exit.
  4. Means that action potential doesn't have to travel down the entire axon, just jumps from node to node.
  5. Voltage Gated Na+ Channels

5 True/False questions

  1. Describe two conditions that allow maintenance of the resting membrane potential. How are concentration gradients involved?IPSP, Inhibitory Post Synaptic Potential.
    Sensory Neurons

          

  2. How are electrical potentials of cell membranes measured?spatial variation of both electrical potential and chemical concentration across a membrane.

          

  3. What is the role of the Schwann Cell in the formation of the myelin sheath. What is the neurilemma? What is a node of Ranvier? Are nodes of Ranvier in both the CNS and the PNS?Schwann cells can point the neuron in the right direction so it can regrow to the proper receptor sites.

          

  4. What principle is applied to transmission of a nerve impulse (action potential)? What is a threshold stimulus? What is the ionic basis for threshold?EPSP - Excitatory Post Synaptic Potential; potential of the cell to reach threshold again after it has been through a cycle.
    IPSP - Inhibitory Post Synaptic Potential; Hyperpolarize on purpose to prevent a response to every stimulus.
    Both

          

  5. What is an electrochemical gradient?spatial variation of both electrical potential and chemical concentration across a membrane.