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APUSHExamReview

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Indentured Servants
People who could not afford passage to the colonies could become indentured servants. Another person would pay their passage, and in exchange, the indentured servant would serve that person for a set length of time (usually seven years) and then would be free.
Regulators
These were vigilante groups active in the 1760s and 1770s in the western parts of North and South Carolina. They violently protested high taxes and insufficient representation in the colonial legislature.
Triangle Trade
the trading system between the Americas, England and Africa; Africa would give slaves and rum to the Americas, including the West Indies; America would offer timber, tobacco, fish, and flour; England would mainly process and ship back
Dominion of New England
1686-The British government combined the colonies of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, and Connecticut into a single province headed by a royal governor (Andros). Ended in 1692, when the colonists revolted and drove out Governor Andros
London Company
a joint-stock company chartered in 1606 and was responsible for founding the first permanent English settlement in America; Jamestown, Virginia in 1607
House of Burgesses
the first elected legislative assembly in the New World established in the Colony of Virginia in 1619, representative colony set up by England to make laws and levy taxes but England could veto its legistlative acts.
Great Migration
when more than 15,000 Puritans journeyed to Massachusetts to escape religious persecution and economic hard times
Quakers
English dissenters who broke from Church of England, preache a doctrine of pacificism, inner divinity, and social equity, under William Penn they founded Pennsylvania
Jamestown
first permanent English settlement, located near the Chesapeake Bay
Pilgrims
Group of English Protestant dissenters who established Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts in 1620 to seek religious freedom after having lived briefly in the Netherlands.
Mayflower Compact
1620 - The first agreement for self-government in America. It was signed by the 41 men on the Mayflower and set up a government for the Plymouth colony.
Fundamental Orders
The constitution of the Connecticut River colony drawn up in 1639, it established a government controlled in democratic style by the "substantial" citizens.
Renaissance
the period of European history at the close of the Middle Ages and the rise of the modern world
Reformation
a religious movement of the 16th century that began as an attempt to reform the Roman Catholic Church and resulted in the creation of Protestant churches
Theocracy
the belief in government by divine guidance
Nathaniel Bacon
a planter who led a rebellion with one thousand other Virginians in 1676; the rebels were mostly frontiersmen forced toward the backcountry in search of fertile land
Parsons Cause
A dispute (in the 1750s) that arose when the king arbitrarily decided to pay ministers in money rather than in tobacco after the value of tobacco rose; England made a joke of this dispute
New England Confederation
New England colonists formed the New England Confederation in 1643 as a defense against local Native American tribes and encroaching Dutch. The colonists formed the alliance without the English crown's authorization.
Paxton Boys
They were a group of Scots-Irish men living in the Appalachian hills that wanted protection from Indian attacks. They made an armed march on Philadelphia in 1764. They protested the lenient way that the Quakers treated the Indians. Their ideas started the Regulator Movement in North Carolina.
Cotton Mather
minister, part of Puritan New England important families, a sholar, one of first americans to pemote vaccination of smallpox when it was believed to be dangerous, strongly believed on witches, encouraged witch trials in salem
Albany Plan of Union
plan proposed by Benjamin Franklin in 1754 that aimed to unite the 13 colonies for trade, military, and other purposes; the plan was turned down by the colonies and the Crown
Bacon‟s Rebellion
an uprising in 1676 in the Virginia Colony, led by Nathaniel Bacon. It was the first rebellion in the American colonies in which discontented frontiersmen took part; a similar uprising in Maryland occurred later that year. The uprising was a protest against the governor of Virginia, William Berkeley.
Pontiac‟s Rebellion
1763 - An Indian uprising after the French and Indian War, led by an Ottowa chief named Pontiac. They opposed British expansion into the western Ohio Valley and began destroying British forts in the area. The attacks ended when Pontiac was killed.
King Philip‟s War
1675 - A series of battles in New Hampshire between the colonists and the Wompanowogs, led by a chief known as King Philip. The war was started when the Massachusetts government tried to assert court jurisdiction over the local Indians. The colonists won with the help of the Mohawks, and this victory opened up additional Indian lands for expansion.
John Smith
Helped found and govern Jamestown. His leadership and strict discipline helped the Virginia colony get through the difficult first winter.
Pocahontas
a Powhatan woman (the daughter of Powhatan) who befriended the English at Jamestown and is said to have saved Captain John Smith's life (1595-1617)
John Rolfe
He was one of the English settlers at Jamestown (and he married Pocahontas). He discovered how to successfully grow tobacco in Virginia and cure it for export, which made Virginia an economically successful colony.
Powhatan
Indian chief and founder of the Powhatan confederacy of tribes in eastern Virginia
Miles Standish
English army captain at Plymouth who helped defend the Pilgrim colony
William Bradford
United States printer (born in England) whose press produced the first American prayer book and the New York City's first newspaper (1663-1752), A Pilgrim, the second governor of the Plymouth colony, 1621-1657. He developed private land ownership and helped colonists get out of debt. He helped the colony survive droughts, crop failures, and Indian attacks.
Squanto
Native American who helped the English colonists in Massachusetts develop agricultural techniques and served as an interpreter between the colonists and the Wampanoag.
Samoset
Native American leader and friend of the early colonists. He was the first to sell land to the Pilgrims (1625).
Massasoit
Wampanoag chieftain who befriended English colonists
King Philip
Indian leader who waged an unsuccessful war against New England
William Penn
A Quaker that founded Pennsylvania to establish a place where his people and others could live in peace and be free from persecution.
George Calvert
Title was Lord Baltimore; founded Maryland as a haven for Catholics
John Berkeley
Co-founded New Jersey with George Carteret
John Winthrop
As governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony, Winthrop (1588-1649) was instrumental in forming the colony's government and shaping its legislative policy. He envisioned the colony, centered in present-day Boston, as a "city upon a hill" from which Puritans would spread religious righteousness throughout the world.
Edmund Andros
Most unpopular Governer in United States history, served in NY and of the Dominion of New England
James Oglethorpe
Founder and governor of the Georgia colony. He ran a tightly-disciplined, military-like colony. Slaves, alcohol, and Catholicism were forbidden in his colony. Many colonists felt that Oglethorpe was a dictator, and that (along with the colonist's dissatisfaction over not being allowed to own slaves) caused the colony to break down and Oglethorpe to lose his position as governor.
John Bartram
America's first botanist; traveled through the frontier collecting specimens.
Pontiac
famous chief of the Ottawa who led an unsuccessful rebellion against the British (1715-1769). Indian Chief; led post war flare-up in the Ohio River Valley and Great Lakes Region in 1763; his actions led to the Proclamation of 1763; the Proclamation angered the colonists.
Toleration Act of 1649
a Maryland law that made restricting the religious of Christians a crime
Jonathan Edwards
The most outstanding preacher of the Great Awakening. He was a New England Congregationalist and preached in Northampton, MA, he attacked the new doctrines of easy salvation for all. He preached anew the traditional ideas of Puritanism related to sovereignty of God, predestination, and salvation by God's grace alone. He had vivid descriptions of Hell that terrified listeners.
Great Awakening
Religious revival in the American colonies of the eighteenth century during which a number of new Protestant churches were established.
Mercantilism
an economic system (Europe in 18th C) to increase a nation's wealth by government regulation of all of the nation's commercial interests
Enlightenment
a movement in the 18th century that advocated the use of reason in the reappraisal of accepted ideas and social institutions
Stone Rebellion
The most serious slave rebellion in the the colonial period which occurred in 1739 in South Carolina. 100 African Americans rose up, got weapons and killed several whites then tried to escape to S. Florida. The uprising was crushed and the participants executed. The main form of rebellion was running away, though there was no where to go.
Navigation Acts
Laws that governed trade between England and its colonies. Colonists were required to ship certain products exclusively to England. These acts made colonists very angry because they were forbidden from trading with other countries.
Salutary Neglect
An English policy of not strictly enforcing laws in its colonies. idea that the colonies benefited by being left alone, without too much British interference
French and Indian War
Was a war fought by French and English on American soil over control of the Ohio River Valley-- English defeated French in 1763. Historical Significance: established England as number one world power and began to gradually change attitudes of the colonists toward England for the worse.
Proclamation Line of 1763
prohibited colonial settlement west of the Appalachian Mountains, colonists werent allowed to settle of buy land there, this led to outrage in the 13 colonies
Revolutionary War
American colonists' war of independence from Britain, fought from 1775-1783.
Lexington and Concord
first "battles"; meant to get suppies from militia, but shots exchanged between minutemen and the british as the british continued to concord; Americans ambushed british, killing 300
Trenton-Princeton
two restounding victories for the Continental army that restored hope in Washington and his men
Saratoga
A battle that took place in New York where the Continental Army defeated the British. It proved to be the turning point of the war. This battle ultimately had France to openly support the colonies with military forces in addition to the supplies and money already being sent.
Yorktown
in 1781 during the American Revolution the British under Cornwallis surrendered after a siege of three weeks by American and French troops
Declaratory Act
Act passed in 1766 just after the repeal of the Stamp Act. Stated that Parliament could legislate for the colonies in all cases.
Annapolis Convention
A convention held in September 1786 to consider problems of trade and navigation, attended by five states and important because it issued the call to Congress and the states for what became the Constitutional Convention
Charles Cornwallis
Commanding general of the British forces that were defeated at Yorktown in 1781, ending the American Revolution.
John Dickinson
Drafted a declaration of colonial rights and grievances, and also wrote the series of "Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania" in 1767 to protest the Townshend Acts. Although an outspoken critic of British policies towards the colonies, Dickinson opposed the Revolution, and, as a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1776, refused to sign the Declaration of Independence.
Thomas Hutchinson
Governor of Boston who ordered cargo of tea to be unloaded in Boston despite colonial objection
Thomas Gage
British general who controlled Boston following the Boston Tea Party., decided to take away the minutemen's weapons and ammunition and they were stored in Concord, 20 miles form Boston.
William Howe
during the summer of 1776, he led hundreds of British ships and 32,000 British soldiers to New York, and offered Congress the choice between surrender with royal pardon and a battle against the odds, and despite having far fewer troops, the Americans rejected the offer.
Nathan Hale
a soldier of the American Revolution who was hanged as a spy by the British
Nathaniel Greene
Quaker-raised American general who employed tactics of fighting and then drawing back to recover, then attacking again. Defeated Cornwallis by thus "fighting Quaker".
Horatio Gates
Burgoyne was forced to surrender his command to this American general on October 17,1777 at the battle of Saratoga.
Stamp Act
an act passed by the British parliment in 1756 that raised revenue from the American colonies by a duty in the form of a stamp required on all newspapers and legal or commercial documents
Townshend Acts
A tax that the British Parliament placed on leads, glass, paint and tea
Sugar Act
halved the duty on foreign made molasses, placed duties on certain imports, and strenghtened the enforcement of the law allowing prosecutors to try smuggling cases in a vice-admiralty court
Quebec Act
Extended boundaries of Quebec and granted equal rights to Catholics and recognized legality Catholic Church in the territory; colonists feared this meant that a pope would soon oversee the colonies.
Boston Tea Party
demonstration (1773) by citizens of Boston who (disguised as Indians) raided three British ships in Boston harbor and dumped hundreds of chests of tea into the harbor
Boston Massacre
The first bloodshed of the Amercan Revolution, as British guards at the Boston Customs House opened fire on a crowd killing five americans
Coercive or Intolerable Acts
1774, closed port of boston to all shipping until bostonians paid for the boston tea party
Declaration of Independence
the document recording the proclamation of the second Continental Congress (4 July 1776) asserting the independence of the colonies from Great Britain
Common Sense
a pamphlet written by Thomas Paine that claimed the colonies had a right to be an independent nation
First Continental Congress
Delagates from all colonies except georgia met to discuss problems with britain and to promote independence 1774
Second Continental Congress
It met in 1776 and drafted and signed the Declaration of Independence, which justified the Revolutionary War and declared that the colonies should be independent of Britain.
Benedict Arnold
Successful American general during the Revolution who turned traitor in 1780 and joined the British cause.
Treaty of Paris of 1783
Treaty Between England and the Colonies , formally ended the American Revolutionary War
Land Ordinance of 1785
A major success of the Articles of Confederation. Provided for the orderly surveying and distribution of land belonging to the U.S.
Northwest Ordinance of 1787
Federal order that divided the Northwest Territory into smaller territories and created a plan for how the territories could become states.
Shay's Rebellion
this conflict in Massachusetts caused many to criticize the Articles of Confederation and admit the weak central government was not working; uprising led by Daniel Shays in an effort to prevent courts from foreclosing on the farms of those who could not pay the taxes
Thomas Jefferson
Virginian, architect, author, governor, and president. Lived at Monticello. Wrote the Declaration of Independence. Second governor of Virgina. Third president of the United States. Designed the buildings of the University of Virginia.
Ben Franklin
highly respected scientist, one of the wealthiest men in Pennsylvania. helped found UPENN, served as agent in london, and Pennsylvania, became convinced the colonies needed to revolt. served as ambassador to france during the war, helped write the declaration of independence, constitution, and helped negotiate the peace treaty ending the revolution
John Adams
America's first Vice-President and second President. Sponsor of the American Revolution in Massachusetts, and wrote the Massachusetts guarantee that freedom of press "ought not to be restrained."
Samuel Adams
Founder of the Sons of Liberty and one of the most vocal patriots for independence; signed the Declaration of Independence
John Hancock
Patriot leader and president of the Second Continental Congress; first person to sign the Declaration of Independence.
Patrick Henry
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George Grenville
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Stamp Act Congress
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Ethan Allen
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Thomas Paine
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John Jay
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Henry Knox
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Robert Livingston
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Edmund Randolph
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Francis Marrion
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William Pitt
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George III
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Edmund Burke
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John Burgoyne
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Sons of Liberty
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Committees of Correspondence
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Gaspee Affair
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Rights of Man Election of 1800
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Strict and Loose Constructionism
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Philadelphia Constitutional Convention
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Federalists
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Anti-Federalists
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Federalist papers
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Judiciary Act of 1789
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Bill of Rights
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Amendments 1-10
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Tariff Act of 1789
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Hamilton‟s Financial Program
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Genet Affair
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Jay Treaty
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Pinckney Treaty
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Whiskey Rebellion
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XYZ Affair
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Alien and Sedition Acts
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Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions (or Resolves)
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1793 Proclamation of Neutrality
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Washington‟s Farewell Address
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Louisiana Purchase
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Burr Conspiracy
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Impressment
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Embargo Act
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Non-Intercourse Act
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Macon‟s Bill No. 2
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Tecumseh
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Hartford Convention
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Treaty of Ghent
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Rush-Bagot Agreement
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Democratic-Republican
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Barbary Pirates
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War of 1812
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George Washington
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Alexander Hamilton
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Yazoo Land Frauds
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National Road
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Francis Scott Key
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Meriwether Lewis and William Clark
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Sacajawea
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James Madison
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Benjamin Banneker
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Edmond Charles Genet
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John Singleton Copley
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John Randolph of Roanoke Missouri Compromise of 1820
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Monroe Doctrine
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John Quincy Adams
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Daniel Webster
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John C. Calhoun
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Henry Clay
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Thomas Hart Benton
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William Crawford
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1824 Election
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Corrupt Bargain
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Tariff of Abominations
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Nullification Crisis
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The American System
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Henry Clay
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Samuel Slater
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American Colonization Society
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Erie Canal
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Cotton Gin
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National Road
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John Marshall
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Spenser Roane
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Marshall Court
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Marbury v. Madison
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McCulloch v. Maryland
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Gibbons v. Ogden
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Fletcher v. Peck
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Barron v. Baltimore
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Dartmouth College v. Woodward
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Commonwealth v. Hunt
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Eli Whitney
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Aaron Burr
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Robert Fulton Denmark Vesey
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Nat Turner
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Gabriel Prosser
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Spoils System
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Webster-Hayne Debate
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Tariff Act of 1832
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Nullification Crisis
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Bank War
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Panic of 1837
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Whigs
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National Republican
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Democratic
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Independent Treasury Act
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Martin Van Buren
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Nicholas Biddle
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Peggy Eaton Affair
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Aroostook "War
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" Compromise Tariff of 1833
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Force Bill
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Gag Rule
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William H. Harrison
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Andrew Jackson
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Adams-Onis Treaty (or Transcontinental Treaty of 1819)
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John C. Calhoun
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South Carolina Exposition and Protest Ann Lee-Shakers
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Oneida Community
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Brook Farm
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Mormons
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New Harmony
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Transcendentalism
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Fourierism
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American Temperance Union
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Second Great Awakening
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Abolitionist Movement
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Seneca Falls Convention
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Hudson River School
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Romanticism
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Horace Mann
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Newspapers
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Lyceum Movement
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Henry D. Thoreau
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Ralph Waldo Emerson
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Washington Irving
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Margaret Fuller
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Walt Whitman
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Edgar Allen Poe
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Emma Willard
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Mary Lyon
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Dorothea Dix
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Samuel Howe
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"54º 40̉ or Fight"
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Robert Owen
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George Caleb Bingham
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Thomas Hart Benton Election of 1844
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Webster-Ashburton Treaty
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Aroostook "War
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" Alamo
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Battle of San Jacinto
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Mexican-American War
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Manifest Destiny
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Oregon Trail
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Wilmot Proviso
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Treaty of Guadelupe Hidalgo
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Free Soil Party
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Compromise of 1850
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Gold Rush
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Sewing Machine
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Steamship
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Panic of 1857
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Cherokee Nation v. Georgia
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Worcester v. Georgia
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Texas Issue
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Mexican Cession
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Gadsden Purchase
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Hawaii
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1846 Treaty with Great Britain (Oregon Boundary Treaty)
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Clayton-Bulwer Treaty
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James Polk
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Ostend Manifesto
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John C. Calhoun Election of 1860
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Uncle Tom's Cabin
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Gadsden Purchase
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Ostend Manifesto
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Personal Liberty Laws
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Kansas-Nebraska Act
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Bleeding Kansas
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Topeka Constitution
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Lecompton Constitution
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Sumner-Brooks Encounter
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Freeport Doctrine
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Harper‟s Ferry
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Lincoln-Douglas Debates
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Republican Party
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Liberty Party
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Know-Nothing Party
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Dred Scott v. Sanford
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Zachary Taylor
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Abraham Lincoln
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Roger Taney
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John Bell
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John Breckenridge
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Stephen Douglas
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Harriet Beecher Stowe
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Franklin Pierce
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James Buchanan
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Harriet Tubman
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Popular Sovereignty
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Ex Parte Milligan
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Ex Parte Merryman
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Prize Cases
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Ableman v. Booth
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Prigg v. Pennsylvania
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John Brown‟s Raid
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Young America
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Cooper Union
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Emigrant Aid Society
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Frederick Douglass
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John Freemont
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William Seward
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Charles Sumner
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Jefferson Davis
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Alexander Stephens
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William Lloyd Garrison
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Salmon P. Chase
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Theodore Weld
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John Slidell
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Henry Clay
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Hinton Helper
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George Fitzhugh
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Secret Six
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Crittenden Compromise
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Crittenden Resolution Manassas Junction-Bull Run
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Fort Sumter
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Northern Strategy
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Southern Strategy
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Vicksburg
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Copperheads
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Pacific Railway Act
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Emancipation Proclamation
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Homestead Act
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Morrill Land Grant Act
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Sherman‟s Campaigns
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Appomattox Courthouse
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Civil War
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Bull Run
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Antietam
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Gettysburg
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Robert E. Lee
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William Tecumseh Sherman
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Winfield Scott
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Anaconda Plan
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Albert S. Johnston
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George McClellan
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John Pope
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Ambrose Burnside
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Joseph Hooker
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George Meade
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Philip Sheridan
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Mathew Brady
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Thomas Jackson
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Clement Vallandigham
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James Weaver
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Confiscation Acts Presidential Reconstruction
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Congressional Reconstruction
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Thirteenth Amendment
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Fourteenth Amendment
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Fifteenth Amendment
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Tenure of Office Act
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1876 Election
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Compromise of 1877
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Bland-Allison Act
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Ulysses S. Grant
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"Bloody" Shirt
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Wade-Davis Bill
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Thaddeus Stevens
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Andrew Johnson Sharecropping
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Crop-Lien System
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Scalawags
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Carpetbaggers
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Ku Klux Klan
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New South
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Black Codes
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Henry Grady
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Civil Rights Cases
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Plessy v. Ferguson Little Big Horn
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Dawes Severalty Act
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Helen Hunt Jackson
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Geronimo
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Red Cloud
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Open- Range
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Wounded Knee
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Frederic Remington Henry George
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Henry Demarest Lloyd
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Thorstein Veblen
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Wabash St. Louis and Pacific Railway Company v. Illinois (1886)
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Munn v. Illinois (1877)
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U.S. v. E.C. Knight Company (1895)
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Jay Gould
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Elizabeth Cady Stanton
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Susan B. Anthony
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Thomas Edison
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Edward Bellamy
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Credit Mobilier
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Whiskey Ring
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Evolution
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Social Darwinism
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Reform Darwinism
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Atlanta Compromise
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Haymarket Riot
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Bessemer Process
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Electric Light Bulb
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Carnegie Steel Company
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Interstate Commerce Act
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Sherman Anti-Trust Act
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Sherman Silver Purchase Act
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Homestead Steel Strike
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Knights of Labor
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Pullman Strike
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National Labor Union
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American Federation of Labor
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Samuel Gompers
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1912 Election
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Nativism
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"New" Immigration versus "Old" Immigration
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Hull House
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American Protective Association
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Immigration Restriction League
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Rerum Vovarum
1891
Social Gospel
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Gospel of Wealth
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Populists
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1896 Election
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1882 Exclusion Act
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1882 Immigration Restriction
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Pendleton Act
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McKinley Tariff
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Andrew Carnegie
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J. P. Morgan
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John D. Rockefeller
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William Jennings Bryan
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Charles Darwin
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Booker T. Washington
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W.E.B. Du Bois
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Muller v. Oregon
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Lochner v. New York
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In re Debs
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Pollock v. Farmers‟ Loan and Trust Co.
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Reagan v. Farmer‟ Loan and Trust Co.
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Bourbon Democrats
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Crime of ‟73
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Robber Baron
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Roscoe Conkling
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Murchison Letter
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Mulligan Letters
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Mugwumps
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William G. Sumner
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Slaughterhouse Cases
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Alexander Graham Bell
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Cornelius Vanderbilt The Grange
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Chautauqua Movement
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Educational Changes
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Literary Realism
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Artistic Realism
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Scientific Advances
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New Social Sciences
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Pragmatism
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Gilded Age
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Greenbacks
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Stalwarts
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Half-Breeds
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Pendleton Act
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Coxey‟s Army
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Granger Movement
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Farmers‟ Alliance
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Populist Movement
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William Marcy Tweed
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Tweed Ring
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Elkins Act
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Hepburn Act
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Meat Inspection Act
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Pure Food and Drug Act
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Payne-Aldrich Tariff
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Jacob Coxey
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Mark Twain
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Coxey‟s War
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Frederick Jackson Turner
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Winslow Homer
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Bret Hart
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William Dean Howells
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Mark Hanna
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William R. Hearst
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Joseph Pulitzer
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Tom Watson
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Mary E. Lease
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Alfred Mahan
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Thomas Reed
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George Dewey
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Charles Eliot
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Louis Sullivan
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Mary Cassat
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William James Progressivism
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Election of 1912
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Progressive Political Reforms
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Muckrakers
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Ashcan School
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Progressive Social Reforms
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Progressive Economic Reforms
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Anthracite Coal Strike
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Hammer v Dagenhart
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"New Freedom
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" Sixteenth Amendment
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Seventeenth Amendment
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Eighteenth Amendment
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Nineteenth Amendment
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Ballinger-Pinchot Affair
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Bull Moose Party
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National Association for the Colored People
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Clayton Anti-Trust Act
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Bull Moose
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Veterans‟ Bureau
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Federal Reserve Act
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Woodrow Wilson
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William Taft
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Theodore Roosevelt
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Robert La Follette
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Ida Tarbell
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Lincoln Steffens
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Frank Norris
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Upton Sinclair
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Jacob Riis
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Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.
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Herbert Croly
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Louis Brandeis
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Pancho Villa
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Victoriana Huerta
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Jane Addams
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Dwight Moody
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Gifford Pinchot Annexation of Hawaii
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Pan-American Conference
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"Yellow" Journalism
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Spanish-American War
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Teller Amendment
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Platt Amendment
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Open Door Policy
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Roosevelt Corollary
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Panama Canal
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Dollar Diplomacy
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Alfred Thayer Mahan
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Imperialism
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Espionage and Sedition Acts
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Red Scare
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Committee on Public Information
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Unrestricted Submarine Warfare
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Fourteen Points
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Treaty of Versailles
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League of Nations
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Lusitania
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Philippines
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World War I
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Bonus Army
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Panama Conference
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Big Stick Diplomacy
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Pan-American Conference
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New Manifest Destiny
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Venezuelan Boundary Dispute
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Hay-Pauncefote Treaty
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Insular Cases
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Schenck v. U.S.
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John Pershing
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Eugene Debs
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Charles Evan Hughes Immigration Act-1921
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Immigration Act-1924
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National Origins Act
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Volstead Act
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Scopes Trial
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Sacco-Vanzetti Trial. Harlem Renaissance
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Prohibition
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Urban-Rural Conflict
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Marcus Garvey
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Assembly Line
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„Normalcy‟
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Teapot Dome
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Harding Scandals
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John Maynard Keynes
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Hawley- Smoot Tariff
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„Black Tuesday‟
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Reconstruction Finance Corporation
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Debt Moratorium
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Bonus Army
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Isolationism
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Four Power Treaty
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Five Power Treaty
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Nine Power Treaty
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Kellogg- Briand Pact
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London Naval Conference
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Good Neighbor Policy
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Dawes and Young Plans
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Clark Memorandum
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Washington Conference
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Herbert Hoover
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Calvin Coolidge
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Warren Harding
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Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti
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A. Mitchell Palmer
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Marcus Garvey
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John Scopes
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Clarence Darrow
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William Jennings Bryan
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Charles Lindbergh
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Charles Chaplin
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John Dewey
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Charles and Mary Beard
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Robert and Helen Lynd
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H. L. Mencken
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Francis Scott Fitzgerald
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Sinclair Lewis
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Ernest Hemmingway
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Andrew Mellon
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Jackson Pollock
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Margaret Sanger
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Albert Fall
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Langston Hughes
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Carl Sandberg
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Grant Wood
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Norman Thomas 1932 Election
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Franklin D. Roosevelt
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Hundred Days Congress
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Tennessee Valley Authority
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„Brain‟ Trust
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Share-Our-Wealth Plan
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First New Deal
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Second New Deal
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Court Packing
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Nye Commitment
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New Deal Program
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Social Security Act
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Fair Labor Standards
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The Federal st Securities Act
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Glass-Steagall Act
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National Industrial Recovery Act
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1 Agricultural nd Adjustment Act
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Tennessee Valley Act
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Works Progress Administration
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Wagner Act
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2 Agricultural Adjustment Act
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Schecter v. United States
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United States v. Butler
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Father Charles Coughlin
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Huey Long
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Dr. Francis Townsend
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Harry Hopkins
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National Recovery Administration
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John Steinbeck World War II
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Stimson Doctrine
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Pearl Harbor
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Midway
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Iwo Jima
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Office of War Mobilization
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Japanese Relocation
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Island Hopping
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Hiroshima Bombing
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Potsdam Conference
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Neutrality Acts
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Cash and Carry
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Quarantine Speech
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Lend-Lease Act
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Destroyers-for-Bases Deal
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Smith Act
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Neutrality Acts
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Casablanca Conference
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Atlantic Charter
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Panay Affair
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Korematsu v. U.S.
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Ex Parte Endo
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Munich Conference Albert Einstein
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Frances Perkins
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Walt Disney
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De Feuer‟s Face
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You‟re A Sap Mr. Jap
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Taft- Hartley Act (1947)
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Harry Truman 1948 Election
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Dixiecrats
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Korean Conflict
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Bay of Pigs
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Cuban Missle Crisis
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Vietnam Conflict
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Inchon
...
Tet Offensive
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Division of Germany
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George Kennan
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Truman Doctrine
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Marshall Plan
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NATO
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China Falls to Communism
...
Communist
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McCarthyism
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Suez Crisis
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Yalta Conference
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Harry S. Truman
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Containment Policy
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Cold War
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Joseph McCarthy
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United Nations
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Potsdam Conference
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Dwight Eisenhower
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Eisenhower Doctrine
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Domino Theory
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Socialism
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Geneva Accords
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Brinksmanship
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John F. Kennedy
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George Marshall
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George Patton
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Chester W. Nimitz
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Douglas MacArthur
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Arthur Vandenburg
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John Foster Dulles Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)
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Civil Rights Movement
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Sit-Ins
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Watts Riot
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Sputnik
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AFL-CIO
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McCarran Internal Security Act
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U-2 Affair
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Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka
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Yates v. United States
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Little Rock Confrontation
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Little Rock 1957
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Martin Luther King Jr.
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Robert Frost
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Alger Hiss
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Storm Thurmond
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Dean Acheson
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Adlai Stevenson
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Thurgood Marshall
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J. D. Salinger
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Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) 1960 Election
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Lyndon B. Johnson
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New Frontier
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Détente
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Congress of Racial Equality
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Montgomery Bus Boycott
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1963 March on Washington
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1964 Civil Rights Act
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1968 Civil Rights Act
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Great Society
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1965 Voting Rights Act
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Alliance for Progress
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Peaceful Coexistence
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Elementary and Secondary Education Acts
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National Defense Education Act
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Gideon v. Wainwright
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Miranda v. Arizona
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Robert McNamara
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Jesse Jackson
...
Betty Friedan
...
Dean Rusk
...
Hubert Humphrey
...
Malcom X
...
Vietnam Conflict
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My Lai Massacre
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Silent Majority
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Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee
...
Kent State
...
Spiro Agnew
...
George Wallace
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Gulf of Tonkin Resolution
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Black Panthers
...
Black Muslims
...
Black Power Movement
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Students for a Democratic Society
...
National Organization for Women
...
Women‟s Movement
...
NASA Watergate
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Iran-Contra Scandal
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Oil Crisis
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Iran Hostage Crisis
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Ronald Reagan
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OPEC
...
Energy Crisis
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Richard M. Nixon
...
Jimmy Carter
...
George Bush
...
1980 Election
...
United States v. Richard M. Nixon
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Colin Powell
...
Leonard Bernstein
...
Andy Warhol
...
Barbara Jordan
...
Henry Kissinger
...
Gerald Ford
...
Geraldine Ferraro
...
War Powers Act Op Art
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Pop Art
...
Cesar Chavez
...
American Indian Movement
...
Roe et al v. Wade
...
Billy Graham
...
Gloria Steinem Persian Gulf Conflict
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Nixon Pardon
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SALT Talks
...
SALT II
...
Camp David Accords
...
Reagonomics
...
Grenada Invasion
...
Panama Invasion
...
Iran-Contra Arms Deal
...
Crumbling of Berlin Wall
...
NASA
...
Desert Storm
...
James Baker
...
Shirley Chisholm
...
Eldridge Cleaver
...
Jerry Falwell
...
Norman Shwarzkopf
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