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213 terms

Barron's GRE with sentences -Wordlist E

A complete list of Barron's GRE Wordlist, with meanings and sentences. The series has the entire wordlist split by alphabets, and also a mega complete wordlist, of all 3757 words. This is Wordlist E.
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earthy
unrefined; coarse
His earthy remarks often embarrassed the women in the audience.
ebb
recede; lessen
His fortunes began to ebb during the recession.
ebullient
showing excitement; overflowing with enthusiasm His ebullient nature could not be repressed.
eccentric
odd; whimsical; irregular
The comet passed close by the earth in its eccentric orbit.
eccentricity
oddity; idiosyncrasy
Some of his friends tried to account for his rudeness to strangers as the eccentricity of genius.
ecclesiastic
pertaining to the church
The minister donned his ecclesiastic garb and walked to the pulpit.
eclectic
selective; composed of elements drawn from disparate sources
His style of interior decoration was eclectic: bits and pieces of furnishings from widely divergent periods,
strikingly juxtaposed to create a unique color.
eclipse
darken; extinguish; surpass
The new stock market high eclipsed the previous record set in 1985.
ecologist
person concerned with the interrelationship between living organisms and their environment
The ecologist was concerned that the new dam would upset the natural balance of the creatures living in
Glen Canyon.
economy
efficiency or conciseness in using something
Reading the epigrams of Pope, I admire the economy of his verse: in few words he conveys worlds of
meaning.
ecstasy
rapture, joy; any overpowering emotion
The announcement that the war had ended brought on an ecstasy that resulted in many uncontrolled
celebrations.
eddy
swirling current of water, air, etc.
The water in the tide pool was still, except for an occasional eddy.
edify
instruct; correct morally
Although his purpose was to edify and not to entertain his audience, many of his listeners were amused
and not enlightened.
eerie
weird
In that eerie setting, it was easy to believe in ghosts and other supernatural beings.
efface
rub out
The coin had been handled so many times that its data had been effaced.
effectual
efficient
If we are to succeed, we must seek effectual means of securing our goals.
effeminate
having womanly traits
His voice was high-pitched and effeminate.
effervescence
inner excitement; exuberance
Nothing depressed her for long; her natural effervescence soon reasserted itself.
effete
worn out; exhausted; barren
The literature of the age reflected the effete condition of the writers; no new ideas were forthcoming.
efficacy
power to produce desired effect
The efficacy of this drug depends on the regularity of the dosage.
effigy
dummy
The mob showed its irritation by hanging the judge in effigy.
effluvium
noxious smell
Air pollution has become a serious problem in our major cities; the effluvium and the poisons in the air are
hazards to life.
effrontery
shameless boldness
She had the effrontery to insult the guest.
effusion
pouring forth
The critics objected to her literary effusion because it was too flowery.
effusive
pouring forth; gushing
Her effusive manner of greeting her friends finally began to irritate them.
egoism
excessive interest in one's self; belief that one should be interested in one's self rather than in
others
His egoism prevented him from seeing the needs of his colleagues.
egotism
conceit; vanity
She thought so much of herself that we found her egotism unwarranted and irritating.
egregious
notorious; conspicuously bad; shocking
She was an egregious liar; we all knew better than to believe a word she said.
egress
exit
Barnum's sign "To the Egress" fooled many people who thought they were going to see an animal and
instead found themselves in the street.
ejaculation
exclamation
He could not repress an ejaculation of surprise when he heard the news.
elaboration
addition of details; intricacy
Tell what happened simply, without any elaboration.
elated
overjoyed; in high spirits
Grinning from ear to ear, Bonnie Blair was clearly elated by her Olympic victory.
elegy
poem or song expressing lamentation On the death of Edward King, Milton composed the elegy "Lycidas."
elicit
draw out by discussion
The detectives tried to elicit where he had hidden his loot.
elixir
cure-all; something invigorating
The news of her chance to go abroad acted on her like an elixir.
ellipsis
omission of words from a text
Sometimes an ellipsis can lead to a dangling modifier, as in the sentence "Once dressed, you should
refrigerate the potato salad.
elliptical
oval; ambiguous, either purposely or because key words have been left out
An elliptical billiad ball wobbles because it is not perfectly round; an elliptical remark baffles because it is
not perfectly clear.
eloquence
expressiveness; persuasive speech
The crowds were stirred by Martin Luther King's eloquence.
elucidate
explain; enlighten
He was called upon to elucidate the disputed points in his article.
elusive
evasive; baffling; hard to grasp
His elusive dreams of wealth were costly to those of his friends who supported him financially.
elysian
relating to paradise; blissful
An afternoon sail on the bay was for her an elysian journey.
emaciated
thin and wasted
His long period of starvation had left him emaciated.
emanate
issue forth
A strong odor of sulfur emanated from the spring.
emancipate
set free
At first, the attempts of the Abolitioninst to emancipate the slaves were unpopular in New England as well
as in the South.
embargo
ban on commerce or other activity
As a result of the embargo, trade with colonies was at a standstill.
embark
commence; go on board a boat; begin a journey
In devoting herself to the study of gorillas, Dian Fossey embarked on a course of action that was to cost
her her life.
embed
enclose; place in something
Tales of actual historical figures like King Alfred have become embedded in legends.
embellish
adorn My mother-in-law's stories about her journey from Russia made us laugh because she embellished the bare
facts of her travels with humourous acecdotes.
embezzlement
stealing
The bank teller confessed his embezzlement of the funds.
embroil
throw into confusion
He became embroiled in the heated discussion when he tried to arbitrate the dispute.
embryonic
undeveloped; rudimentary
The evil of class and race hatred must be eliminated while it is still in an embryonic state; otherwise, it may
grow to dangerous proportions.
emend
correct, usually a text
The critic emended the book by retranslating several passages.
emendation
correction of errors; improvement
Please initial all the emendations you have made in this contract.
emetic
substance causing vomiting
The use of an emetic like mustard is useful in cases of poisoning.
eminent
high; lofty
After his appointment to this emiment position, he seldom had time for his former friends.
emissary
agent; messenger
The secretary of State was sent as the President's special emissary to the conference on disarmament.
emollient
soothing or softening remedy
He applied an emollient to the inflamed area.
emolument
salary; compensation
In addition to the emolument this position offers, you must consider the social prestige it carries with it.
empathy
ability to identify with another's feelings, ideas, etc
What made Ann such a fine counselor was her empathy, her ability to put herself in her client's place and
feel his emotions as if they were her own.
empirical
based on experience
He distrusted hunches and intuitive flashes; he placed his reliance entirely on empirical data.
emulate
rival; imitate
As long as our political leaders emulate the virtues of the great leaders of this country, we shall flourish.
enamored
in love
Narcissus became enamored of his own beauty.
enclave
territory enclosed within an alien land
The Vatican is an independent enclave in Italy.
encomiastic
praising; eulogistic
Some critics believe that his encomiastic statements about Napoleon were inspired by his desire for
material advancement rather than by an honest belief in the Emperor's genius.
encomium
high praise; eulogy
Uneasy with the encomiums expressed by his supporters, Tolkien felt unworthy of such high praise.
encompass
surround
Although we were encompassed by enemy forces, we were cheerful for we were well stocked and could
withstand a siege until our allies joined us.
encroachment
gradual intrusion
The encroachment of the factories upon the neighborhood lowered the value of the real estate.
encumber
burden
Some people encumber themselves with too much luggage, when they take short trips.
endearment
fond word or act
Your gifts and endearments cannot make me forget your earlier insolence.
endemic
prevailinig among a specific group of people or in a specific are or country
This disease is endemic in this part of the world; more than 80 percent of the population are at one time or
another affected by it.
endorse
approve; support
Everyone waited to see which one of the rival candidates for the city council the mayor would endorse.
endue
provide with some quality; endow
He was endued with a lion's courage.
enduring
lasting; surviving
Keats believed in the enduring power of great art, which outlast its creator's brief lives.
energize
invigorate; make forceful and active
Rather than exhausting Maggie, dancing energized her.
enervate
weaken
She was slow to recover from her illness; even a short walk to the window evervated her.
enfranchise
admit to the rights of citizenship (especially the right to vote)
Although blacks were enfranchised shortly after the Civil War, women did not receive the right to vote
until 1920.
engage
attract; hire; pledge oneself; confront
"Your case has engaged my interest, my lord," said Holmes, "You many engage my services."
engender
cause; produce
To receive praise for real accomplishments engenders self-confidence in a child.
engross
occupy fully
John was so engrossed in his studies that he did not hear his mother call.
enhance
advance; improve
Your chances for promotion in this department will be enhanced if you take some more courses in evening
school.
enigma
puzzle
Depite all attempts to decipher the code, it remained an enigma.
enigmatic
obscure; puzzling
Many have sought to fathom the enigmatic smile of the Mona Lisa.
enjoin
command; order; forbid
The owners of the company asked the court to enjoin the union from picketing the plant.
enmity
ill will; hatred
At Camp David President Carter labored to bring an end to the enmity that prevented Egypt and Israel
from living in peace.
ennui
boredom
The monotonous routine of hopital life induced a feeling of ennui which made him moody and irritable.
enormity
hugeness (in a bad sense)
He did not realize the enormity of his crime until he saw what suffering he had caused.
enrapture
please intensely
The audience was enraptured by the freshness of the voices and the excellent orchestration.
ensconce
settle comfortably
The parents thought that their children were ensconced safely in the private school and decided to leave
for Europe.
ensue
follow
The evils that ensued were the direct result of the miscalculations of the leaders.
enthrall
capture; enslave
From the moment he saw her picture, he was enthralled by her beauty.
entice
lure; attract; tempt
She always tried to entice her baby brother into mischief.
entity
real being
As soon as the charter was adopted, the United Nations became an entity and had to be considered as a
factor in world diplomacy.
entomology
study of insects
I found entomology the least interesting part of my course in biology; studying insects bored me.
entrance
put under a spell; carry away with emotion
Shafts of sunlight on a wall could entrance her and leave her spellbound.
entreat
plead; ask earnestly
She entreated her father to let her stay out till midnight.
entree
entrance; a way in
Because of his wealth and social position, he had entree into the most exclusive circles.
entrepreneur
businessperson; contractor
Opponents of our present tax program argue that it discourages entrepreneurs from trying new fields of
business activity.
enumerate
list; mention one by one
Huck hung his head in shame as Miss Watson enumerated his many flaws.
enunciate
speak distinctly
How will people understand you if you do not enunciate?
environ
enclose; surround
Paris was environed by a wall
eon
long period of time; an age
It has taken eons for our civilization to develop.
epaulet
ornament worn on the shoulder (of a uniform, etc.)
The shoulder loops on Sam Spade's trench coat are the nonmilitary counterparts of the fringed epaulets on
George Washington's uniform.
ephemeral
short-lived; fleeting
The mayfly is an ephemeral creature.
epic
long heroic poem, novel, or similar work of art
Kurosawa's film Seven Samurai is an epic portraying the struggle of seven warriors to destroy a band of
robbers.
epicure
connoisseur of food and drink
epicures frequent this restaurant because it features exotic wines and dishes.
epigram
witty thought or saying, usually short
Poor Richard's epigrams made Benjamin Franklin famous.
epilogue
short speech at conclusion of dramatic work
The audience was so disappointed in the play that many did not remain to hear the epilogue.
episodic
loosely connected
Though he tried to follow the plot of Gravity's Rainbow, John found the novel too episodic.
epistemologist
philosopher who studies the nature of knowledge
"What is more important, a knowledge of nature of the nature of knowledge?" the epistemologist asked the
naturalist.
epitaph
inscription in memory of a dead person
In his will, he dictated the epitaph he wanted placed on his tombstone.
epithet
word or phrase characteristically used to describe a person or thing
So many kings of France were named Charles that modern students need epithets to tell them apart:
Charles the Wise, for example, was someone far different from Charles the Fat.
epitome
perfect example or embodiment
Singing "I am the very model of a modern Major-General" in The Pirates of Penzance, Major-General
Stanley proclaimed himself the epitome of an officer and a gentleman.
epoch
period of time
The glacial epoch lasted for thousands of years.
equable
tranquil; steady; uniform
After the hot summers and cold winters of New England, he found the climate of the West Indies equable
and pleasant.
equanimity
calmness of temperament
In his later years, he could look upon the foolishness of the world with equanimity and humor.
equestrian
rider on horseback
These paths in the park are reserved for equestrians and their steeds.
equilibrium
balance
After the divorce, he needed some time to regain his equilibrium.
equine
resembling a horse
His long, bony face had an equine look to it.
equinox
period of equal days and nights; the beginning of spring and autumn
The vernal equinox is usually marked by heavy rainstorms.
equipoise
balance; balancing force; equilibrium
The high-wire acrobat used his pole as an equipose to overcome the swaying caused by the wind.
equitable
fair; impartial
I am seeking an equitable solution to this dispute, one which will be fair and acceptable to both sides.
equity
fairness; justice
Our courts guarantee equity to all.
equivocal
doubtful; ambiguous
Macbeth was misled by the equivocal statements of the witches.
equivocate
lie; mislead; attempt to conceal the truth
The audience saw through his attempts to equivocate on the subject under discussion and ridiculed his
remarks.
erode
eat away
The limestone was eroded by the dripping water
erotic
pertaining to passionate love
The erotic passages in this novel should be removed as they are merely pornographic.
errant
wandering
Many a charming tale has been written about the knights-errant who helped the weak and punished the
guilty during the Age of Chivalry.
erratic
odd; unpredictable
Investors become anxious when the stock market appears erratic.
erroneous
mistaken; wrong
I thought my answer was correct, but it was erroneous.
erudite
learned; scholarly
His erudite writing was difficult to read because of the many allusions which were unfamiliar to most
readers.
escapade
prank; flighty conduct
The headmaster could not regard this latest escapade as a boyish joke and expelled the young man.
eschew
avoid
He tried to eschew all display of temper.
esoteric
hard to understand; known only to the chosen few
New Yorker short stories often include esoteric allusions to obscure people and events: the implication is if
you are in the in-crowd, you'll get the reference; if you come from Cleveland, you won't.
espionage
spying
In order to maintain its power, the government developed a system of espionage that penetrated every
hosehold.
espouse
adopt; support
She was always ready to espouse a worthy cause.
esteem
repect; value; judge
I esteem Ezra Pound both for his exciting poetry and for his acute comments on literature.
estranged
separated; alienated
The estranged wife sought a divorce.
ethereal
light; heavenly; fine
Visitors were impressed by her ethereal beauty, her delicate charm.
ethnic
relating to races
Intolerance between ethnic groups is deplorable and usually is based on lack of information.
ethnology
study of mankind
Sociology is one aspect of the science of ethnology.
ethos
underlying character of a culture, group, etc.
Seeing how tenderly Spaniards treated her small daughter made author Barbara Kingsolver aware of how
greatly children were valued in the Spanish ethos.
etymology
study of word parts
A knowledge of etymology can help you on many English tests.
eugenic
pertaining to the improvement of race
It is easier to apply eugenic principles to the raising of racehorses or prize cattle than t the development of
human beings.
eulogistic
praising
To everyone's surprise, the speech was eulogistic rather than critical in tone.
eulogy
praise
All the eulogies of his friends could not remove the sting of the calumny heaped upon him by his enemies.
euphemism
mild expression in place of an unpleasant one
The expression "he passed away" is a euphemism for "he died."
euphony
sweet sound
Noted for its euphony even when it is spoken, the Italian language is particularly pleasing to the ear when
sung.
euphoria
feeling of exaggerated (or unfounded) well-being
"Jill's been on cloud nine ever since Jacj asked her out," said Betty, dismissing her friend's euphoria.
euthanasia
mercy killing
Many people support euthanasia for terminally ill patients who wish to die.
evanescent
fleeting; vanishing
For a brief moment, the entire skyline was bathed in an orange-red hue in the evanescent rays of the
sunset.
evasive
not frank; eluding
Your evasive answers convinced the judge that you were witholding important evidence.
evince
show clearly
When he tried to answer the questions, he evinced his ignorance of the subject matter.
evenhanded
impartial; fair
Do men and women receive evenhanded treatment from their teachers, or, as recent studies suggest, do teachers pay more attention to male students than to females?
evoke
call forth
He evoked much criticism by his hostile manner.
ewe
female sheep
The flock of sheep was made up of dozens of ewes, together with only a handful of rams.
exacerbate
worsen; embitter
This latest arrest will exacerbate the already existing discontent of the people and enrage them.
exacting
extremely demanding
The colonies rebelled against the exacting financial claims of the mother country.
exalt
raise in rank or dignity; praise
The actor Alec Guinness was exalted to the rank of knighthood by the Queen; he now is known as Sir Alec
Guinness.
exasperate
vex
Johnny often exasperates his mother with his pranks.
excerpt
selected passage (written or musical)
The cinematic equivalent of an excerpt from a novel is a clip from a film.
exchequer
treasury
He had been Chancellor of the exchequer before his promotion to the office he now holds.
excise
cut away; cut out
When you excise the dead and dying limbs of a tree, you not only improve its appearance but also enhance
its chances of bearing fruit.
excoriate
flay; abrade
These shoes are so ill-fitting that they will excoriate the feet and create blisters.
exculpate
clear from blame
He was exculpated of the crime when the real criminal confessed.
execrable
very bad
The anecdote was in execrable taste and shocked the audience.
execrate
curse; express abhorrence for
The world execrates the memory of Hitler and hopes that genocide will never again be the policy of any
nation.
execute
put into effect; carry out
The choreographer wanted to see how well she could execute a pirouette.
exegesis
explanation, especially of biblical passages
I can follow your exegesis of this passage to a limited degree; some of your reasoning eludes me.
exemplary
serving as a model; outstanding
Her exemplary behavior was praised at commencement.
exemplify
show by example; furnish an example
Three-time winner of the Super Bowl, Joe Montana exemplifies the ideal quarterback.
exertion
effort; expenditure of much physical work
The exertion involved in unscrewing the rusty bolt left her exhausted.
exhort
urge
The evangelist will exhort all sinners in his audience to reform.
exhume
dig out of the ground; remove from a grave
Because of the rumor that he had been poisoned, his body was exhumed in order that an autopsy might be
performed.
exigency
urgent situation
In this exigency, we must look for aid from our allies.
exiguous
small; minute
Grass grew there, an exiguous outcropping among the rocks.
existential
pertaining to existence; pertaining to the philosophy of existentialism
To the existential philosopher, human reason is inadequate to explain an irrational, meaningless universe.
exodus
departure
The exodus from the hot and stuffy city was particularly noticeable on Friday evenings.
exonerate
acquit; exculpate
I am sure this letter naming the actual culprit will exonerate you.
exorbitant
excessive
The people grumbled at his exorbitant prices but paid them because he had a monopoly.
exorcise
drive our evil spirits
By incantation and prayer, the medicine man sought to exorcise the evil spirits that had taken possession of
the young warrior.
exotic
not native; strange
Because of his exotic headdress, he was followed in the streets by small children who laughed at his strange
appearance.
expatiate
talk at length
At this time, please give us a brief resume of your work; we shall permit you to expatiate later.
expatriate
exile; someone who has withdrawn from his native land
Henry James was an American expatriate who settled in England.
expedient
suitable; practical; politic
A pragmatic politician, he was guided by what was expedient rather than by what was ethical.
expedite
hasten
We hope you will be able to expedite delivery because of our tight schedule.
expertise
specialized knowledge; expert skill
Although she was knowledgeable in a number of fields, she was hired for her particular expertise in
computer programming.
expiate
make amends for (a sin)
He tried to expiate his crimes by a full confession to the authorities.
expletive
interjection; profane oath
The sergeant's remarks were filled with expletives that offended the new recruits.
explicate
explain; interpret; clarify
Harry Levin explicated James Joyce's novels with such clarity that even Finnegan's Wake seemed
comprehensible to his students.
explicit
totally clear; definite; outspoken
Don't just hint around that you're dissatisfied: be explicit about what's bugging you.
exploit
deed or action, particularly a brave deed
Raoul Wallenberg was noted for his exploits in rescuing Jews from Hitler's forces.
exploit
make use of, sometimes unjustly
Caesar Chavez fought attempts to exploit migrant farmworkers in California.
expository
explanatory; serving to explain
The mannual that came with my VCR was no masterpiece of expository prose: its explanations were so
garbled that I couldn't even figure out how to rewind a tape.
expostulation
protest; remonstrance
Despite the teacher's scoldings and expostulations, the class remained unruly.
exposure
risk, particularly of being exposed to disease or to the elements; unmasking; act of laying
something open
Exposure to sun and wind had dried out her hair and weathered her face.
expunge
cancel; remove
If you behave, I will expunge this notation from your record.
expurgate
clean; remove offensive parts of a book
The editors felt that certain passages in the book had to be expurgated before it could be used in the
classroom.
extant
still in existence
Although the authorities suppressed the book, many copies are extant and may be purchased at exorbitant prices.
extemporaneous
not planned; impromtu
Because his extemporaneous remarks were misinterpreted, he decided to write all his speeches in advance.
extenuate
weaken; mitigate
It is easier for us to extenuate our own shortcomings than those of others.
extirpate
root up
The Salem witch trials were a misguided attempt to extirpate superstition and heresy.
extol
praise; glorify
The astronauts were extolled as the pioneers of the Space Age.
extort
wring from; get money by threats, etc.
The blackmailer extorted money from his victim.
extradition
surrender of prisoner by one state to another
The lawyers opposed the extradition of their client on the grounds that for more than five years he had
been a model citizen.
extraneous
not essential; external
Do not pad your paper with extraneous matters; stick to essential items only.
extrapolation
projection; conjecture
Based on their extrapolation from the results of the primaries on Super Tuesday, the networks predicted
that George Bush would be the Republican candidate for the presidency.
extricate
free; disentangle
He found that he could not extricate himself from the trap.
extrinsic
external; not inherent; foreign
Do not be fooled by extrinsic causes. We must look for the intrinsic reason.
extrovert
person interested mostly in external objects and actions
A good salesperson in usually an extrovert, who likes to mingle with people.
extrude
force or push out
Much pressure is required to extrude these plastics.
exuberant
abundant; effusive; lavish
His speeches were famous for his exuberant language and vivid imagery.
exude
discharge; give forth
The maple syrup is obtained from the sap that the trees exude in early spring.
exult
rejoice
We exulted when our team won the victory.