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Unit 2 ap questions

Terms in this set (4)

"Brothers, We tell you that we seek not war, we ask nothing better than to be quiet, and it depends, Brothers, only on you English, to have peace with us.
"We have not yet sold the lands we inhabit, [and] we wish to keep the possession of them. Our elders have been willing to tolerate you, brothers Englishmen, on the seaboard. . . . But we will not cede one single inch of the lands we inhabit beyond what has been decided formerly by our fathers.
"[The governor of French Canada] who is here present has nothing to do with what we say to you; we speak to you of our own accord, and in the name of all our allies. . . . We are entirely free; we are allies of the King of France, from whom we have received the Faith and all sorts of assistance in our necessities; we love that Monarch, and we are strongly attached to his interests."
Ateawanto, Abenaki Indian leader, speech delivered to a representative of the royal governor of Massachusetts at a treaty conference between the Abenaki of present-day Maine, the Iroquois Indians of present-day New York, the French, and the English, 1752
Which of the following groups would have most opposed the goals of the speech?
A
British settlers
B
French fur traders
C
The king of France
D
Religious missionaries

Which of the following was a main purpose of Ateawanto in his speech?
A
To establish commerce between his people and the English
B
To form an alliance between his people and the French
C
To seek his people's freedom from French oppression
D
To protect his people's land from English colonizers

The speech in the excerpt was delivered in which of the following historical situations during the mid-1700s?
A
The use of Native American laborers in plantation agriculture
B
The attempts by French settlers to acquire Native American land
C
Competition between European empires for Native American allies
D
The founding of the first British colonies in Native American territory
"[In Virginia] the Negroes live in small cottages called quarters . . . under the direction of an overseer, who takes care that they tend such land as the owner allots and orders. . . . Their greatest hardship [is] consisting in that they and their posterity are not at their own liberty or disposal, but the property of their owners. . . . The children belong to the master of the woman that bears them. . . .
"[The] abundance of [the] English entertain . . . that they are all fools and beggars that live in any [other] country but theirs. This home fondness has been very prejudicial [harmful] to the common sort of English, and has in a great measure [slowed] the plantations from being stocked with such inhabitants as are skillful, industrious, and laborious. . . .
"These [English] servants are but an insignificant number, when compared with the vast shoals [mass] of Negroes who are employed as slaves there to do the hardest and most part of the work."
Hugh Jones, The Present State of Virginia, 1724
The labor system described in the first paragraph of the excerpt was most similar to the labor system used for
A
mining in New Spain
B
whaling in New England
C
acquiring furs in New France
D
producing sugar in the Caribbean

The development described in the excerpt represented which of the following long-term trends in Virginia?
A
The hardening of racial divisions
B
The oversupply of indentured laborers
C
The dominance of subsistence farming
D
The Anglicization of colonial culture

The economy of the Middle Colonies differed from the economy of Virginia described in the excerpt in that the Middle Colonies more often
A
relied on enslaved labor in cities
B
imported enslaved Africans
C
engaged in trans-Atlantic commerce
D
purchased land from Native Americans
"I . . . longed to see and hear him, and wished he would come this way. And I soon heard he was [to] come to New York and [New Jersey] and great multitudes [began] flocking after him under great concern for their souls which brought on my concern more and more hoping soon to see him. . . .
"Then one morning all of a sudden, about 8 or 9 o'clock there came a messenger and said Mr. Whitefield . . . is to preach at Middletown this morning. . . . I was in my field at work. I dropped my tool that I had in my hand and ran home and . . . bade my wife get ready quick to go and hear Mr. Whitefield preach at Middletown, and [ran] to my pasture for my horse with all my might, fearing that I should be too late to hear him.
". . . . When we got to the old meeting house there was a great multitude; it was said to be 3 or 4,000 . . . people assembled together. . . .
"When I saw Mr. Whitefield . . . he looked almost angelical . . . and my hearing how God was with him everywhere as he came along it solemnized my mind, and put me into a trembling fear before he began to preach . . . and my old foundation was broken up, and I saw that my righteousness would not save me. . . ."
Nathan Cole, farmer, describing going to hear Reverend George Whitefield preach in Middletown, Connecticut, 1740
Which of the following most directly contributed to the ideas described in the excerpt?
A
The increasing social mobility of colonists encouraged the promotion of religious revivals emphasizing hierarchy and authority.
B
The widespread production of cash crops contributed to increasing prosperity throughout the colonies.
C
The large number of enslaved people in the colonies expanded the influence of non-European cultural traditions.
D
The British colonies became part of a trans-Atlantic print culture that facilitated the spread of European ideas.

The events described in the excerpt most directly reflected which of the following developments?
A
The exchange of Enlightenment ideas between Europe and the Americas
B
Concerns about political corruption among colonial officials
C
The spread of the First Great Awakening from Britain to North America
D
Efforts across New England to convert Native Americans

The events described in the excerpt resulted in which of the following developments in the British North American colonies?
A
Protestant evangelicalism furthered the Anglicization of the colonies.
B
Colonial assemblies attempted to assert more independence from Britain.
C
Religious leaders in New England expanded support for the abolitionist movement.
D
Britain enacted mercantilist policies to protect its economy from competition.