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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. The Last of the Mohicans
  2. "Civil Disobedience: On the Duty of Civil Disobedience"
  3. The Federalist Papers (The Federalist)
  4. How the Other Half Lives
  5. Pragmatism
  1. a 1849; Henry David Thoreau; He expressed opposition to the Mexican War. Thoreau argued that individuals have a moral responsibility to oppose unjust laws and unjust actions by governments. Thoreau's essay influenced Dr. King's philosophy of nonviolent civil disobedience.
  2. b 1757; James Fenimore Cooper; It was part of a series of novels known as the Leatherstocking Tales. Copper was the first American writer to feature uniquely American characters. Copper created the first genuine Western heroes in American literature. Cooper's novels gave expression to the concept of the "noble savage."
  3. c 1907; William James; His concept of pragmatism held that truth was to be tested, above all, by the practical consequences of an idea, by action rather than theories. In short, beliefs should not be tested by experience. The ultimate test of truth is experience, not logic. It is important to remember that William James and other pragmatists do not believe in the existence of absolute truth.
  4. d 1787; Hamilton, Madison, and Jay; Supported the ratification of the Constitution of 1787. They challenged the conventional political wisdom of the eighteenth century when they asserted that a large republic offered the best protection of minority rights.
  5. e 1890; Jacob Riis was the author; Riis was a journalist and photographer working primarily in New York City. Riis's book provided poignant pictures that gave a human face to the poverty and despair experienced by immigrants living in the New York City's Lower East Side

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. 1846; William Holmes McGuffey; Also known as Eclectic Reader. The best known and most widely-used reading instruction books in the nineteenth century. It is estimated that this time four-fifths of all American school children used McGuffey readers.
    The McGuffey Readers featured stories, poems, and essays supporting patriotism and moral values.
  2. 1963; Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.; Dr. King argued that citizens have "a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws." Civil disobedience is thus a justified response to unjust laws.
  3. 1939; John Steinbeck; Describes the plight of "Okies" forced to leave Dust Bowl-stricken Oklahoma in a futile attempt to find work in California.
  4. 1854; Henry David Thoreau; The novel espoused transcendentalism—that is, truth through inner reflection and exposure to nature. It recorded Thoreau's thoughts concerning the value of a life of simplicity and contemplation.
  5. 1900; L. Frank Baum; Originally written as a political commentary on free silver and the plight of American farmers.
    The Ashcan School of Art, early 1900s This was a group of eight American artists, led by John Sloan. Focused on depicting urban scenes such as crowded tenements and boisterous barrooms.

5 True/False questions

  1. Uncle Tom's Cabin1872; Harriet Beecher Stowe; The novel strengthened Northern opposition to slavery. It was second only to the Bible in sales


  2. Jazz1854; Henry David Thoreau; The novel espoused transcendentalism—that is, truth through inner reflection and exposure to nature. It recorded Thoreau's thoughts concerning the value of a life of simplicity and contemplation.


  3. "Common sense"1957; Jack Kerouac; The novel expressed the alienation and disillusionment of the Beat Generation of the 1950s. Like other Beat Generation writers, Kerouac rejected middle-class conformity and materialism.


  4. "The Significance of the Frontier in American History"1893; Frederick Jackson Turner; He argued that the development of American individualism and democracy was shaped by the frontier experience. Turner's "frontier thesis" focused on the importance of the absence of a feudal aristocracy. In other words, America did not have a hereditary landed nobility. Here is a famous excerpt: "From the beginning of the settlement of America, the frontier regions have exercised a steady influence toward democracy. . . . American democracy is fundamentally the outcome of the experience of the American people in dealing with the West."


  5. Horatio Alger Jr. Stories(1867-1899); Horatio Alger Jr.; This is a collection of approximately 270 dime novels. Alger's novels feature rags-to-riches stories describing how down-and-out boys become rich and successful through hard work, honesty, and a little luck.