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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Horatio Alger Jr. Stories
  2. Democracy in America
  3. Silent Spring
  4. Lost Generation of the 1920s
  5. Pragmatism
  1. a Key writers included Sinclair Lewis and F. Scott Fitzgerald; Called this because they were disillusioned with American society during the 1920s. They criticized main-class conformity and materialism. For example, Sinclair Lewis criticized middle-class life in novels such as Babbitt and Main Street. Harlem Renaissance, 1920s. Key writers included Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Claude McKay, Josephine Baker, and James Weldon Johnson. They created distinctive African American literature. Writers expressed pride in their African American culture.
  2. b 1835; Alexis de Tocqueville; He argued that American individualism arose as a result of the absence of an aristocracy.
  3. c (1867-1899); Horatio Alger Jr.; This is a collection of approximately 270 dime novels. Alger's novels feature rags-to-riches stories describing how down-and-out boys become rich and successful through hard work, honesty, and a little luck.
  4. d 1962; Rachel Carson; Her work protested the contamination of the air, land, and water with chemical insecticides such as DDT. The novel played a key role in sparkling the environmental movement in the United States.
  5. e 1907; William James; His concept of pragmatism held that truth was to be tested, above all, by the practical consequences of an idea, by action rather than theories. In short, beliefs should not be tested by experience. The ultimate test of truth is experience, not logic. It is important to remember that William James and other pragmatists do not believe in the existence of absolute truth.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. 1890; Jacob Riis was the author; Riis was a journalist and photographer working primarily in New York City. Riis's book provided poignant pictures that gave a human face to the poverty and despair experienced by immigrants living in the New York City's Lower East Side
  2. 1950s; Key musicians included Little Richard, Chuck Berry, and Elvis Presley. Rock and roll first emerged during the 1950s. Rock and roll was inspired and strongly influenced by Black musical traditions, especially rhythm and blues.
  3. 1849; Henry David Thoreau; He expressed opposition to the Mexican War. Thoreau argued that individuals have a moral responsibility to oppose unjust laws and unjust actions by governments. Thoreau's essay influenced Dr. King's philosophy of nonviolent civil disobedience.
  4. 1757; James Fenimore Cooper; It was part of a series of novels known as the Leatherstocking Tales. Copper was the first American writer to feature uniquely American characters. Copper created the first genuine Western heroes in American literature. Cooper's novels gave expression to the concept of the "noble savage."
  5. 1854; Henry David Thoreau; The novel espoused transcendentalism—that is, truth through inner reflection and exposure to nature. It recorded Thoreau's thoughts concerning the value of a life of simplicity and contemplation.

5 True/False questions

  1. McGuffey Readers1846; William Holmes McGuffey; Also known as Eclectic Reader. The best known and most widely-used reading instruction books in the nineteenth century. It is estimated that this time four-fifths of all American school children used McGuffey readers.
    The McGuffey Readers featured stories, poems, and essays supporting patriotism and moral values.

          

  2. The Organization Man1956; W. H. Whyte; The novel criticizing the homogenous culture of the 1950s. It criticizes American conformity and the belief that economic growth would solve all problems.

          

  3. The Scarlet Letter1831; William Lloyd Garrison; It called for the "immediate and uncompensated emancipation of the slaves." Famous quote: " Let Southern oppressors tremble. . . I will be as harsh as Truth and as uncompromising as Justice. . . I am in earnest - I will not retreat a single inch—and I WILL BE HEARD!"

          

  4. The Liberator1906; Upton Sinclair; The novel exposed appalling conditions in the Chicago meatpacking industry. It was a classic example of a muckraking novel. The novel helped bring about passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act of 1906.

          

  5. On the Road1957; Jack Kerouac; The novel expressed the alienation and disillusionment of the Beat Generation of the 1950s. Like other Beat Generation writers, Kerouac rejected middle-class conformity and materialism.