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EXAM VII: POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE

POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE
STUDY
PLAY
PKD
TREATMENT:
Medicine and surgery to reduce pain
Antibiotics to resolve infections
Control hypertension
Dialysis to replace functions of failed kidneys
Kidney transplantation
PKD
DX:
Ultrasound of kidney cysts
Ultrasound if cysts in other organs
Family medical history (genetic testing)
PKD
SYMPTOMS:
pain in the back and lower sides
headaches
urinary tract infections
blood in the urine
cysts in the kidneys and other organs
PKD
CAUSES:
AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT PKD is the most common inherited form. Symptoms usually develop between the ages of 30 and 40, but they can begin earlier, even in childhood. About 90 percent of all PKD cases are autosomal dominant PKD.
Autosomal recessive PKD is a rare inherited form. Symptoms of autosomal recessive PKD begin in the earliest months of life, even in the womb.
Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) develops in association with long-term kidney problems, especially in patients who have kidney failure and who have been on dialysis for a long time. Therefore it tends to occur in later years of life. It is not an inherited form of PKD.
PKD
Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a genetic disorder characterized by the growth of numerous cysts in the kidneys. PKD cysts can slowly replace much of the mass of the kidneys, reducing kidney function and leading to kidney failure
When PKD causes kidneys to fail—which usually happens after many years—the patient requires dialysis or kidney transplantation.