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History: Unit 4 - The New Nation (11)

Terms in this set (164)

Manifest Destiny and Its Legacy

2. 1840 Election Reopens Texas Question
3. Harrison (Whig) dies after 30 days in office
3. Tyler (former Dem) takes over, immediately tries to establish his power
4. Tyler is a Virginia slave owner
4. Tyler favors states' rights, opposes Whigs (his own party), who expel him from party
[Annexation of TexasTexas had declared its independence from Mexico five years before Tyler came to power. The President hoped to draw support for a new political party that he was attempting to form by leading a drive to annex Texas and make it a state. Mexico, however, still considered Texas its own and threatened war if the United States interfered. Also troubling to many Americans was the prospect of yet another slave state upsetting the sectional balance in Congress. But Tyler -- slave owner, states' rights champion, and man without a party -- saw Texas as his ticket back to political respectability. His new party, the Democratic Republicans, used "Tyler and Texas!" as their slogan.The President, however, made a serious tactical error that ruined the scheme. In 1844, for his new secretary of state, he appointed John C. Calhoun, the South Carolina firebrand who had led his state's secession movement over the tariff question during the Jackson years. Since Texas was still another nation, negotiations to secure its statehood fell to Calhoun, and his blatant proslavery views made abolitionists uneasy. His message to Congress contained a long, eloquent defense of slavery. Martin Van Buren, eager to avenge his loss to "Tippecanoe and Tyler Too," deployed his patented skills at backstage political maneuvering to doom the annexation treaty. The proposal for statehood failed to pass in the Senate, even with Andrew Jackson's vocal support. Tyler was determined to make the Texas question the focus of his reelection bid and submitted an annexation bill which needed only a majority vote in the House and Senate, which it got. Tyler signed the Texas statehood bill into law on the first day of March 1845, just three days before leaving office.Congress relished directing a final insult at the President. On Tyler's last day in office, it overrode his veto of a minor bill to fund some small ships for the government. It was the first override of a presidential veto in American history.]
Manifest Destiny and Its Legacy

3. Tyler wants to annex Texas, make it a state
4. Believes TX is negotiating with France, Great Britain
4. Fears U.S. expansion southward could be restricted if TX falls under foreign influence
4. 1844 - New Secretary of State John C. Calhoun, negotiates a Texas statehood bill. His explanation to Congress includes an intense pro-slavery position for statehood. The Senate rejects the bill
4. Tyler tries one last time as he is leaving office. This time, the bill passes and Texas is admitted as the 28th state in 1845, just three days before Tyler leaves office.
[Annexation of TexasTexas had declared its independence from Mexico five years before Tyler came to power. The President hoped to draw support for a new political party that he was attempting to form by leading a drive to annex Texas and make it a state. Mexico, however, still considered Texas its own and threatened war if the United States interfered. Also troubling to many Americans was the prospect of yet another slave state upsetting the sectional balance in Congress. But Tyler -- slave owner, states' rights champion, and man without a party -- saw Texas as his ticket back to political respectability. His new party, the Democratic Republicans, used "Tyler and Texas!" as their slogan.The President, however, made a serious tactical error that ruined the scheme. In 1844, for his new secretary of state, he appointed John C. Calhoun, the South Carolina firebrand who had led his state's secession movement over the tariff question during the Jackson years. Since Texas was still another nation, negotiations to secure its statehood fell to Calhoun, and his blatant proslavery views made abolitionists uneasy. His message to Congress contained a long, eloquent defense of slavery. Martin Van Buren, eager to avenge his loss to "Tippecanoe and Tyler Too," deployed his patented skills at backstage political maneuvering to doom the annexation treaty. The proposal for statehood failed to pass in the Senate, even with Andrew Jackson's vocal support. Tyler was determined to make the Texas question the focus of his reelection bid and submitted an annexation bill which needed only a majority vote in the House and Senate, which it got. Tyler signed the Texas statehood bill into law on the first day of March 1845, just three days before leaving office.Congress relished directing a final insult at the President. On Tyler's last day in office, it overrode his veto of a minor bill to fund some small ships for the government. It was the first override of a presidential veto in American history.
Texas is 28th state - now slave is 15, free 13but by 1848 - two more free states enter to tie the balance at 15 all]
Manifest Destiny and Its Legacy

2. U.S. defeats Mexico in Mexican-American War (1846-48)
3. U.S. gains complete control of CA, NM through efforts of generals Zachary Taylor, Winfield Scott and Stephen Kearny
3. Explorer John C. Fremont sets up "Bear Flag Republic" in California
[U.S. Army Captain John C. FrémontU.S. Army Captain John C. Frémont had spread rumors of impending action against settlers by the Mexican government and encouraged rebellion. A group of thirty-three men strode into the Sonoma town center, and raised a flag with a bear and star on it (the "Bear FlagU.S. Army Captain John C. Frémont had spread rumors of impending action against settlers by the Mexican government and encouraged rebellion. A group of thirty-three men strode into the Sonoma town center, and raised a flag with a bear and star on it (the "Bear Flag") to symbolize a new California Republic, independent from Mexico. This use of the flag led these actions to be dubbed the "Bear Flag Revolt."
That same day, the men captured the former Mexican Commandante of Northern California, General Mariano Guadalupe VallejoThat same day, the men captured the former Mexican Commandante of Northern California, General Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, who was the leader of a private military company at the Presidio of SonomaThat same day, the men captured the former Mexican Commandante of Northern California, General Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, who was the leader of a private military company at the Presidio of Sonoma. Vallejo was taken prisoner and sent to Sutter's FortThat same day, the men captured the former Mexican Commandante of Northern California, General Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, who was the leader of a private military company at the Presidio of Sonoma. Vallejo was taken prisoner and sent to Sutter's Fort where he was imprisoned through August 1That same day, the men captured the former Mexican Commandante of Northern California, General Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, who was the leader of a private military company at the Presidio of Sonoma. Vallejo was taken prisoner and sent to Sutter's Fort where he was imprisoned through August 1, 1846That same day, the men captured the former Mexican Commandante of Northern California, General Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, who was the leader of a private military company at the Presidio of Sonoma. Vallejo was taken prisoner and sent to Sutter's Fort where he was imprisoned through August 1, 1846. The Republic's first and only president was William B. Ide[1], whose term lasted twenty-five days. On June 23, whose term lasted twenty-five days. On June 23, 1846, whose term lasted twenty-five days. On June 23, 1846, Frémont arrived with his force of sixty soldiers and took over command of the combined forces. The Mexican governor was concerned, and he sent 50 troops to attack the Bear Flaggers. General Jose Castro, whose term lasted twenty-five days. On June 23, 1846, Frémont arrived with his force of sixty soldiers and took over command of the combined forces. The Mexican governor was concerned, and he sent 50 troops to attack the Bear Flaggers. General Jose Castro attempted to the stop the revolt, but his forces were sorely defeated at the Battle of Olompilai.
Unknown to the men, warUnknown to the men, war had already been declared on May 13Unknown to the men, war had already been declared on May 13, 1846Unknown to the men, war had already been declared on May 13, 1846 between the United StatesUnknown to the men, war had already been declared on May 13, 1846 between the United States and Mexico, but the news took until mid-July 1846 to reach California: On July 7Unknown to the men, war had already been declared on May 13, 1846 between the United States and Mexico, but the news took until mid-July 1846 to reach California: On July 7, 1846Unknown to the men, war had already been declared on May 13, 1846 between the United States and Mexico, but the news took until mid-July 1846 to reach California: On July 7, 1846 a frigate (Savannah) and two sloops (Cyane and Levant) of the U.S. Navy) of the U.S. Navy, commanded by John D. Sloat) of the U.S. Navy, commanded by John D. Sloat, routed the detachment of the Mexican Coast Guard garrisoning the port of Monterey, California[2] [3] in a minor skirmish (the Battle of Monterey in a minor skirmish (the Battle of Monterey), and alerted Frémont and his men that the Mexican-American War in a minor skirmish (the Battle of Monterey), and alerted Frémont and his men that the Mexican-American War had begun. In response the "Bear Flaggers" abandoned the idea of the Republic, and joined the efforts to make California part of the United States. They replaced their flag with the Stars and Stripes. Ide was demoted from president to private in the "California Battalion" controlled by Frémont.]