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101 terms

English 1 Honors Final Poems

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Dulce Et Decorum Est
Wilfred Owen
The Eagle
Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Winter
William Shakespeare
When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer
Walt Whitman
There is No Frigate Like a Book
Emily Dickinson
Cross
Langston Hughes
The World is too Much with Us
William Wordsworth
I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud
William Wordsworth
Mirror
Sylvia Plath
Kubla Khan
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The Tiger
William Blake
The Lamb
William Blake
The Sick Rose
William Blake
On First Looking into Chapman's Homer
William Blake
Ode on a Grecian Urn
John Keats
The Second Coming
William Butler Yeats
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time
Robert Herrick
Richard Cory
Edwin Arlington Robinson
When my Love Swears That She is Made of Truth
William Shakespeare
Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night
Dylan Thomas
Anthem for Doomed Youth
Wilfred Owen
Bright Star
John Keats
Ballad of Birmingham
Dudley Randall
Rime of the Ancient Mariner
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Lyrical Ballads
Wordsworth and Coleridge
Tintern Abbey
William Wordsworth
Songs of Innocence & Songs of Experience
William Blake
Marriage of Heaven and Hell (major prose piece)
William Blake
Eve of St. Agnes
John Keats
Dulce et Decorum Est
tone: dark, angry, resentful, tragic, vindictive
about: experiences of war; war is not what it appears to be; and the realities of war

Irony

"to children ardent for some desperate glory, the old lie: Dulce et decorum est"

speaker: Solider

author: Wilfred Owen
The Eagle
tone: admirable, powerful, majestic

Fixed Meter (8)

about: an onlooker admiring an eagle; separate from humanity
(thunderbolt-allusion to Zeus)

"He watches from his mountain walls, and like a thunderbolt he falls"

author: Alfred (Lord) Tennyson
Winter
tone: harsh, real, frigid, homely, portrays the true ideas of winter

about: the harsh realities of the winter season

~structured (owl-mysterious, wise, nocturnal, archetypal)

"Then nightly sings the staring owl, "Tu-whit, tu-who!" a merry note"

author: William Shakespeare
When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer
tone: annoyed, independent, questioning

about: a person seeing a lecture from an astronomer; hearing facts about the world and space

~free verse with no structure

speaker appreciates simplicity, is independent, and is disgusted because the world and planets cannot be described with facts

"In the mystical moist night air, and from time to time, looked up in perfect silence at the stars"

Author: Walt Whitman
Kubla Khan
tone: enchanted, vivid, crazy

about: palace in Imperial City (paradise); dreams about experiencing paradise, nature

Xanudu=paradise

no meter; holy and enchanted city

"For he on honey-dew hath fed, and drunk the milk of Paradise"

"In Xanudu did Kubla Khan a stately pleasure-dome decree"

author: Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The Tiger
tone: crazy, fiery, questioning, angry

about: someone describing a tiger and questioning why someone would create such a fierce killing animal

tiger: powerful, solitary, fast, sly, nature

*quatrain

"Tiger! Tiger! burning bright in the forests of the night, what immortal hand or eye could frame thy fearful symmetry?"

author: William Blake- songs of experience
The Lamb
tone: playful, optimistic
*apostrophe

about: a baby lamb, asking who created such a cute loving creature

*opposite of " The Tiger"; beautiful and good

"Little Lamb, who made thee? Dost thou know who made thee?"

author: william blake- songs of experience
The Sick Rose
tone: emotional, scandalous, assonance

about: speaker is talking to a rose (apostrophe) or a woman, about a love affair

~passion, beauty, love, scorn, thorns

no meter, emotionally loaded connotative words ex: destroy, sick, storm

"O Rose, thou art sick!"

"And his dark secret love does thy life destroy."

author: william blake
On First Looking Into Chapman's Homer
*Petrarchan sonnet

tone: experienced, journeyed

about: a journey to Ithaca- Homer's Iliad and Odyssey

many possibilities

meter-10

"Much have I traveled in the realms of gold, and many goodly states and kingdoms seen"

"Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes he stared at the Pacific"

author: John Keats
There is no Frigate like a Book
tone: imaginative, personified, fairytale

about: the speaker tells of how a book's journey is much more rewarding and easier to come across than the time it takes to ride on a ship, plane, or car

frigate- implies power, strength

*books can expand ones imagination

cheap vs. frugal

"How frugal is the Chariot that bears the Human soul"- The Nouns are capitalized

author: Emily Dickinson
Cross
tone: burdened, angry, journeyed, religious, racial, confused, unbelonging

about: neither fitting in with blacks or whites because he comes from mixed race (Harlem Renaissance) *rhyme scheme and meter

cross between black and white

"I wonder where I'm gonna die, being neither white nor black?"

author: Langston Hughes
The World is Too Much With Us
tone: sordid, disgusted

rhyme scheme-Meter

about: someone expressing how humans dont take the time to appreciate the world around them; we are out of tune and cannot hear nature

creed- statement of beliefs

*sordid boon- good to have but ruins you

"We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!"

author: William Wordsworth
I wandered lonely as a cloud
tone: childish, magical, carefree, happy-go-lucky

about: understanding oneself and being one with nature; wondering what it would be like to wander as a cloud

*bliss of solitude- paradox

fantasy, lighthearted, magical

"And then my heart with pleasure fills, and dances with the daffodils" -personification

"Ten thousand saw I at a glance, tossing their heads in sprightly dance."

author: William Wordsworth
Mirror
tone: depressing, straightforward

about: personification of a mirror and how it tells life as it is; mirror is unbiased

"In me she has drowned a young girl, and in me an old woman rises toward her day after day, like a terrible fish."

author: Sylvia Plath
Ode on a Grecian Urn
tone: cynical, awestruck, beauty, story

about: speaker reveling about the artwork on an urn and how the stories from the paintings are timeless

around the urn (form and purpose) is a story, sometimes unknown

*one can form their own song and story about the urn

*apostrophe

Greek theme- communion with nature

10 line stanzas

"Beauty is truth, truth beauty,-that is all ye know on earth, and all ye need to know."

author: John Keats
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time
tone: cavalier, spontaneous, in the moment

about: living life and making the most out of a day; carpe diem!; don't let anything hold you back, no regrets

tarry- delay or linger

*quatrain

rhyme scheme and meter

"Then not be coy, but use your time; and while ye may, go marry; for having lost but once your prime, you may forever tarry."

author: Robert Herrick (British cavalier poet)
Richard Cory
tone: ironic, admiring, glittering, descriptive

about: a happy (appears), wealthy guy who has it all, who one day goes home and kills himself

*quatrain with meter

speaker- poor person "on the pavement"

Richard Cory- glittered, richer than a king, admirable, graceful, girls, slim, summer

*IRONY

"And Richard Cory, one calm summer night, went home and put a bullet through his head."

"And he was rich- yes, richer than a king- and admirably schooled in every grace:"

author: Edwin Arlington Robinson
When My Love Swears That She is Made of Truth
tone: cynical, paradox from the beginning, questioning

about: the speaker's wife is unfaithful, but he lies about feeling young; all the lies are out in the open and they are comfortable so the speaker wonders why the can't tell the truth?

*English sonnet- iambic pentameter; ends with a couplet, line 9-turn

"And age in love loves not to have years told: therefore i lie with her and she with me, and in out faults by lies we flattered be."

"On both sides thus is simple truth supprest. But wherefore says she not she is unjust?"

author: William Shakespeare
Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night
tone: regretful, rage, pleading

about: author speaking to dying father asking him to stay alive; sees the regrets, the things the father never did

nighttime- metaphor for death

end of life

3 lined stanzas

"Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay, rage, rage against the dying of the light."

author: Dylan Thomas
The Second Coming
tone: dark, doomed, terror fear

about: the coming of white men to Africa; cultures and lives being destroyed; anarchy loosed upon the world

"Things fall apart; the center cannot hold; mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,"

"Surely some revelation is at hand; surely the Second Coming is at hand."

author: William Butler Yeats
Ballad of Birmingham
tone: despaired, fear, protective, loving

about: mother sends child to church because she does not want her marching in the streets, the church is bombed and the daughter is killed

*quatrain with meter and rhyme scheme

irony

"The mother smiled to her child was in the sacred place, but that smile was the last smile to come upon her face."

author: Dudley Randall
Anthem for Doomed Youth
tone: dark, disturbed, angry, gloomy, tender

about: the harsh realities in war, questioning the value of war

wives are left behind; the funerals that go with war

*sonnet with couplet at the end

orison-prayer; pallor-pale; pall- cover for a coffin

guns replaced choirs and bells

"What passing bells for these who die as cattle? only the monstrous anger of the guns."

"Their flowers the tenderness of patient minds, and each slow dusk a drawing-down of blinds."

author: Wilfred Owen
William Wordsworth
(1770-1850) collaborated with Samuel Taylor Coleridge- lyrical ballads

unsavory reputation

published "lyrical ballads" with Coleridge

famous works: Tintern Abbey

Marked real beginning of English Romanticism
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
(1772-1834) worked with Wordsworth- lyrical ballads; Wordsworth was a good influence

original Eminem

popularized German thought in England

original hippie- hopelessly in love with Wordsworth's sister

wrote his best poems with Wordsworth

famous works: The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Kubla Khan
William Blake
(1757-1827) engraved and published Songs of Innocence and the darker Songs of Experience

major prose- Marriage of Heaven and Hell

rebellion against tyrants and oppressive codes

famous works: The Tiger, The Lamb, The Sick Rose
John Keats
(1795-1821) Here Lies One Whose Name Was Writ in Water

Percy Shelley helped him publish his "Poems" in 1817- failed

died of TB in 1821

known for Spencerian sonnet

famous works: Eve of St. Agnes and Ode on a Grecian Urn
Dulce et Decorum Est
"Gas! GAS! Quick, boys! - An ecstasy of fumbling"
Winter
"Tu-whit, tu-who! A merry note, while greasy Joan doth keel the pot"
The Eagle
"He watches from his mountain walls, and like a thunderbolt he falls"
There is no Frigate like a book
"How frugal is the Chariot that bears the Human soul"
When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer
"How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick, Till rising and gliding out I wandered off by myself"
Cross
"I wonder where I'm gonna die, being neither white nor black?"
The Second Coming
"The center cannot hold; Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world."
I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud
"Which is the bliss of solitude; and then my heart with pleasure fills and dances with the daffodils"
The World is Too Much With Us
"We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!"
Mirror
"I am not cruel, only truthful- the eye of a little god, four-cornered" "In me she has drowned a young girl and in me an old woman rises toward her day like a terrible fish."
Kubla Khan
"And close your eyes with holy dread, for he on honey-dew hath fed and drunk the milk of Paradise."
Tiger Tiger
"What immortal hand or eye could frame thy fearful symmetry?"
The Lamb
"He is meek and he is mild, he became a little child; I a child and thou a lamb"
Rime of the Ancient Mariner
Old sailor tells story of the albatross at a wedding
On 1st Looking into Chapman's Homer
"Much have I traveled in the realms of gold, and many goodly states and kingdoms seen"
The Sick Rose
"O Rose, thou art sick!"
Ode on a Grecian Urn
"Beauty is truth, truth beauty - that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know"
Bright Star
"Bright star, would I were steadfast as thou art - not in lone splendor hung aloft the night"
Dulce et Decorum est
Wilfred Owen
Winter
William Shakespeare
There is no frigate like a book
Emily Dickinson
The Eagle
Lord Alfred Tennyson
When I heard the Learn'd Astronomer
Walt Whitman
Cross
Langston Hughes
Mirror
Sylvia Plath
Ode on a Grecian Urn
John Keats
Rime of the Ancient Mariner
Samuel Taylor Coleridge/William Wordsworth
Tiger Tiger
William Blake
The Lamb
William Blake
The Sick Rose
William Blake
On 1st Looking into Chapman's Homer
John Keats
Kubla Khan
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The Second Coming
W.B. Yeats
Bright Star
John Keats
The World is Too Much With us
William Wordsworth
I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud
William Wordsworth
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time
Robert Herrick
To the Virgins, to make Much of Time
"Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, Old Time is still a-flying. And this same flower that smiles today Tomorrow will be dying"
Richard Cory
"He was a gentleman from sole to crown, clean favored, and imperially slim"
Richard Cory
Edwin Arlington Robinson
Ballad of Birmingham
Dudley Randall
Ballad of Birmingham
"No, baby, no, you may not go, for the dogs are fierce and wild, and clubs and hoses, guns and jails aren't good for a little child"
Tintern Abbey
William Wordsworth (uncovered poem)
Lyrical Ballads
William Wordsworth/Samuel Taylor Coleridge (started Romantic movement)
Marriage of Heaven and Hell
William Blake (major prose work in 1790)
Eve of St. Agnes
John Keats (uncovered poem)