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BLS for Health Care Providers Course Study Cards

Terms in this set (263)

As with any biomedical device, routine maintenance is necessary to ensure that the device performs properly and safely. AEDs require minimal maintenance, but it is important to check them regularly according to the manufacturer's instructions or your facility's policy to ensure that they are in good working order and ready to use whenever they are needed.
-Familiarize yourself with the owner's manual and follow the manufacturer's instructions for maintaining the equipment.
-Familiarize yourself with the method the AED uses to indicate the status of the device. Many AEDs have a status indicator that displays a symbol or illuminates to indicate that the AED is in proper working order and ready to respond.
-The status indicator may also display symbols indicating routine maintenance (e.g., a battery change) is needed or that a problem with the device has been detected. Some AEDs have a warning indicator that illuminates or beeps if the AED is not in proper working order or is not ready to respond.
-Make sure the battery is properly installed and within its expiration date.
-Make sure AED pads are adequately stocked, stored in a sealed package and within their expiration date.
-After using the AED, make sure that all supplies are restocked and that the device is in proper working order.
-If at any time the AED fails to work properly or warning indicators illuminate or beep, take the AED out of service based on manufacturer's recommendations and contact the manufacturer or the appropriate person at your facility, according to your facility's policy.
1. perform a visual survey
-Check your surroundings for safety.
-Gather an initial impression, including whether there is severe, life-threatening bleeding.
-Determine the need for additional resources.
*The sequence of these steps is not critical if all goals are accomplished. Depending on the setting, additional resources may include emergency medical services (EMS), the rapid response team or the resuscitation team. Follow standard precautions, including using personal protective equipment (PPE), and obtain consent before proceeding if appropriate.
2. Check for responsiveness
-Shout, "Are you OK?" Use the patient's name if you know it.
-Tap the patient's shoulder and shout again (shout-tap-shout).
-If the patient is unresponsive and you are alone, call for help to activate EMS, the rapid response team or the resuscitation team, as appropriate, and call for an AED.
-If the patient is unresponsive and you are with another provider, the first provider stays with the patient. Other providers activate EMS, the rapid response team or the resuscitation team, as appropriate, and retrieve the AED, bag-valve-mask (BVM) resuscitator and other emergency equipment.
3. Simultaneously check for breathing and pulse
-Open the patient's airway to a past-neutral position, using the head-tilt/chin-lift technique. Or, use the modified jaw-thrust maneuver, if you a suspect head, neck or spinal injury.
-Simultaneously check for breathing and a carotid pulse for at least 5 seconds but no more than 10.
Provide chest compressions
The compressor exposes the chest and performs 15 chest compressions.
For Children: The compressor centers their hands on the lower half of the sternum and compresses the chest to a depth of about 2 inches (5 cm) at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute, allowing for full chest recoil.
For Infants: The compressor centers their thumbs on the lower half of the sternum. Using the encircling thumbs technique, the compressor compresses the chest to a depth of about 1½ inches (3.8 cm), or one-third the anterior-posterior diameter of the chest, and at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute, allowing for full chest recoil.

Deliver ventilations
The airway manager seals the BVM mask and simultaneously opens the airway to a slightly past-neutral position for children or a neutral position for infants using the head-tilt/chin-lift technique. Or, they use the modified jaw-thrust maneuver if a head, neck or spinal injury is suspected.
The ventilator delivers 2 ventilations. Each ventilation should last about 1 second and make the chest begin to rise.
Practice Note
If only one provider is available to operate the BVM, they take on the role of airway manager and ventilator.

Practice Note
If a child or infant is in cardiac arrest and an advanced airway is in place, one provider delivers 1 ventilation every 6 to 8 seconds. At the same time, a second provider performs compressions at a rate of 100 to 120 per minute. In this case, the compression-to-ventilation ratio of 15:2 does not apply because compressions and ventilations are delivered continuously with no interruptions.


Switch positions
The providers smoothly switch positions about every 2 minutes. This should take less than 10 seconds.
The compressor calls for a position change by saying "switch" in place of the number 1 in the compression cycle.

Continue CPR
The compressor provides 15 chest compressions at the proper rate and depth, using correct hand placement and allowing for full chest recoil.
The airway manager maintains an open airway and seals the mask.
The ventilator delivers 2 ventilations with the child or infant-sized BVM resuscitator or pocket mask.