Only $35.99/year

Terms in this set (609)

1. Write an amendment to be proposed by Congress. Either the House of Representatives or the Senate can initiate the amendment.
2. Introduce the amendment to both legislative bodies. In order to pass, both the Senate and the House of Representatives will need to pass the amendment.
3. Debate the amendment. Before voting on whether or not to pass the amendment, senators and representatives will want to debate the amendment and have their support or objections heard and recorded.
4. Vote on the amendment. To pass, both the Senate and the House of Representatives will have to approve the amendment by a two-thirds majority.
5. Pay attention to any time limits. Congress will often require the proposed amendment is approved within 7 years, otherwise it goes no further.
6. Send the approved amendment to the states for ratification. Article V says that states may ratify the amendment through the legislature or a state convention.
Use the Office of the Federal Register (OFR), which is part of the National Archives. The OFR will process and publish the approved amendment, and ensure each state gets a copy of it for ratification.
Get approval from the state legislature. If a state prefers to have a convention to decide whether to support the amendment, Article V of the Constitution allows them to do so. This has only happened with 1 amendment.
7. Wait for three-fourths of the states to ratify the amendment (38 of the 50 states). Once this happens, the Constitution has been amended.
8. Certify the amendment with the National Archives and publish it in the Federal Register.

Other way: Constitutional Convention
1. Call for a Constitutional Convention. Two-thirds of the state legislatures must call for a convention if they want to propose amendments that Congress has not taken up.
2. Use the Convention to propose 1 amendment or a series of amendments. A constitutional amendment proposed by at least two-thirds of the state legislatures is as legal as an amendment proposed by Congress.
3. Send the amendment to the individual states for ratification. At least three-fourths (38 of 50) of the states must ratify the amendment.
4. Remember that this method has never been done in the history of the United States to amend the Constitution. It is still legal, however, and can be done if the Congress will not act on what a majority of the states believe is a necessary constitutional amendment.
5. Certify the amendment with the National Archives and publish it in the Federal Register.