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EXAM 7 Hematology Oncolgy

Terms in this set (728)

d. Hemolytic

A hemolytic transfusion reaction occurs when antibodies in the recipient's blood react to foreign blood cells introduced by the transfusion. The antibodies bind to the foreign cells and destroy them in a process known as hemolysis. The destroyed cells are excreted by the kidneys (hemoglobinuria), causing the red-tinged urine. Hemolytic transfusion reactions can result in acute renal injury, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and circulatory collapse.


A febrile transfusion reaction can occur in clients who have received multiple blood product transfusions. It is a response in which anti-white blood cell (WBC) antibodies react with the WBCs remaining in the blood product. This results in chills, fever, hypotension, tachycardia and tachypnea. Clients who have a history of multiple blood product transfusions may receive leukocyte reduced blood or single-donor HLA matched platelets along with a WBC filter to prevent febrile reactions.
Allergic (anaphylactic) transfusion reactions occur most often in clients who have pre-existing allergies. It is thought to be the result of a reaction to the plasma protein contained in the blood product. Manifestations include urticaria, itching, and flushing. In extreme cases, bronchospasm and laryngeal edema, and shock may occur. Onset may occur as late as 24 hr following the transfusion. Clients who have a history of allergies may receive blood products in which the WBCs, plasma, and immunoglobulin A has been removed or the client may be pre-treated with antihistamines and corticosteroids.
An acute pain transfusion reaction can occur during or following transfusion with blood products. It manifests as severe chest, joint, and back pain, along with hypertension and flushing of the face and neck. The client is often anxious. Acute pain transfusion reactions are treated symptomatically with medications for pain and rigors.
D

A hemolytic transfusion reaction occurs when antibodies in the recipient's blood react to foreign blood cells introduced by the transfusion. The antibodies bind to the foreign cells and destroy them in a process known as hemolysis. The destroyed cells are excreted by the kidneys (hemoglobinuria), causing the red-tinged urine. Hemolytic transfusion reactions can result in acute renal injury, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and circulatory collapse.
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A febrile transfusion reaction can occur in clients who have received multiple blood product transfusions. It is a response in which anti-white blood cell (WBC) antibodies react with the WBCs remaining in the blood product. This results in chills, fever, hypotension, tachycardia and tachypnea. Clients who have a history of multiple blood product transfusions may receive leukocyte reduced blood or single-donor HLA matched platelets along with a WBC filter to prevent febrile reactions.
Allergic (anaphylactic) transfusion reactions occur most often in clients who have pre-existing allergies. It is thought to be the result of a reaction to the plasma protein contained in the blood product. Manifestations include urticaria, itching, and flushing. In extreme cases, bronchospasm and laryngeal edema, and shock may occur. Onset may occur as late as 24 hr following the transfusion. Clients who have a history of allergies may receive blood products in which the WBCs, plasma, and immunoglobulin A has been removed or the client may be pre-treated with antihistamines and corticosteroids.
An acute pain transfusion reaction can occur during or following transfusion with blood products. It manifests as severe chest, joint, and back pain, along with hypertension and flushing of the face and neck. The client is often anxious. Acute pain transfusion reactions are treated symptomatically with medications for pain and rigors.