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81 terms

art fundamentals terms

STUDY
PLAY
color schemes
the choices of color grouping that artists work with
arbitrary color
when artists ignore the real colors of objects and instead make color choices that support personal preference and express meaning
monochromatic
color scheme involving the use of one color plus tints and shades of that color
hue
color
tint
created by adding white to the color
shade
created by adding black to the color
value
the darkness or lightness of a color
blending
when the value is gradually changed from lightness to darkness with a smooth transition
complementary colors
colors that are opposite each other on the color wheel. they are considered to have the greatest contrast between one another
color wheel
the spectrum of colors bent into a circle
intensity
the brightness or dullness of a hue
split complementary
color scheme when an artist uses a color and the colors on each side of its complement
color triads
using three colors that are spaced in equal distance apart
primary colors
red, blue, yellow
secondary colors
purple, green, orange
intermediate colors
created by mixing two primary colors plus its secondary color
analogous colors
using colors that are next to each other on the color wheel
warm colors
red, orange, yellow
cool colors
blue, green, violet, gray
color can also be used to create _____ in a composition.
depth
space
element through which all other elements may exist
composition
the artist's attempt to arrange subject matter within a given space
positive space
the area occupied by the shape(s) in a composition
negative space
the area around the shapes in a composition
a composition can be _______ in various ways
balanced
symmetrically
when the design appears exactly the same on both sides from the center
assymmetrically
appears balanced but is not exacly the same on both sides of the center
radial balance
represented by any design which moves from the center out
line
element that can be described as the path of a moving point
shape
an area apparently enclosed by a line
form
when a shape takes on 3D qualities
soft edges
organic
hard edges
geometric
irregular
freeform
contour line
has varied line weight, is continuous, and accurately follows the surface and edge of a form
depth of space
attempt to create illusion of images which go back into space
perspective
using lines to create an accurate representation of 3D objects on a 2D plane
picture plane
the area defined to be drawn
horizon line
a line which represents the eye level of the viewer drawn across the page
vanishing point
an area which represents where the viewer can no longer see into deep space
one-point perspective
the plane of an object that is parallel to the line-of-sight contains vertical and horizontal lines while the lines that show depth convergence to the vanishing point
two-point perspective
the corner of the object is parallel to the line-of-sight and both sides converge to vanishing points in opposite directions
point-of-view
the angle from which you see an object
texture
element that refers to how things feel and look as if they might feel if touched
composition
the intentional arrangement of subject matter
rhythm
an attempt to create a sense of movement in a composition through the repitition of elements
motif
a unit that is repeated in visual rhythm
gradation
any gradual change in an element such as gradation in color or value
variety
attempt to avoid sameness or monotony
unity
quality of wholeness or oneness
proximity
limiting the negative space between shapes
proportion
principle concerned with size relationships of one part to another
emphasis
makes one part of a work dominant over the other parts
contrast
the difference among the elements in a work of art
harmony
creates unity by stressing the similarities of sparate but related parts
real texture
the actual change in the surface quality
simulated texture
attempt to imitate an acual texture by reproducing a visual illusion of a real texture
invented texture
attempt to create new textures which are not trying to imitate, but trying to invent new textural images
landscape
painting or drawing in which natural land scenery is the main feature
cityscape
represents an image of a city or part of a city
portrait
image of a person
media
material used to create a piece of artwork
mixed-media
combination of two or more processes to create an artwork
additive
adding material while creating a sculpture
assembling
when the artist gathers and joins together a variety of different materials to make a sculpture
modeling
when a soft, pilable material is built up and shaped
subtractive
materials are taken away from the mian object to create a sculpture
in-the-round sculpture
a person can view the sculpture from the front, side, and back views
relief
can only be seen from the front because it is carved out from its base
art criticism
an organized approach for studying a work of art
aesthetics
a branch of philosophy concerned with the nature and value of art
imitationalism
focuses on realistic representation and literal qualities
formalism
places emphasis on design qualities and how well the work is organized
emotionalism
requires that a work of art must arouse a response of feeling, moods, or emotions in the viewer
Michelangelo
a Renaissance artist who was famous for his realistic sculpture
Photorealism
using photographs as reference to create the artwork
Pablo Picasso
influenced by the simple, geometric designs of African masks
abstract
in which objects are made into distorted shapes
Aaron Douglas
worked in the abstract manner
non-objective
artwork with no recognizable subject matter
mass/graphic communication
art trying to convince the public on a social, political issue or try to get consumers to buy a product