AP Psychology Motivation and Emotion

STUDY
PLAY

Terms in this set (...)

emotion
a four part process that involves psychological arousal, subjective feelings, cognitive interpretation, and behavioral expression
display rules
the permissible ways of displaying emotions in a particular society
lateralization of emotion
different influences of the two brain hemispheres on various emotions
james lange theory
the proposal that an emotion provoking stimulus produces a physcial response that, in turn, produces and emotion
cannon bard theory
the counter proposal than an emotional feeling and an internal physiological response occur at the same time
two factor theory
the proposal claiming that emotion resluts from the cognitive appraisal of both physical arousal and an emotion provoking stimulus
cognitive appraisal theory
theory of emotion which theorizes that individuals deicde on an appropriate emotions following the event
opponent process theory
theory of emotion which theorizes that emotions have pairs. When one is triggered, the other is suppressed
polygraph
a device that records or graphs many measures of physical arousal, such as heart rate, breathing, perspiration, and blood pressure
motivation
all the processes involved in starting, directing, and maintaining physical and psychological activities
drive
biologically instigated motivation
motive
an internal mechanism that selects and directs behavior
intrinsic motivation
the desire to engage in an activity for its own sake, rather than for some external consequence, such as reward
extrinsic motivation
the desire to engage in an activity to achieve an external consequence, such as a reward
conscious motivation
having the desire to engage in an activity and being aware to the desire
unconscious motivation
having a desire to engage in an activity but being consciously unaware of the desire
fixed action patterns
genetically based behaviors, seen across a species, that can be set off by a specific stimulus
need
in drive theory, it is a biological imbalance that threatens survival if it is left unmet. They produce drives
homeostasis
the body's tendencey to maintain a biologically balanced condition, especially with regard to nutrients, water, and temperature
locus of control
an individuals's sense of where his or her life influences originate internally or externally
hierarchy of needs
in Maslow's theory, the notion that needs occur in priority order, with the biological needs as the most basic
overjustification
the process by which entrinisic rewards can sometimes displace internal motivation, as when a child recieves money for playing video games
set point
refers to the tendency of the body to maintain a certain level of body fat and body weight
approach approach conflict
a conflict in which one must choose between two equally attractive options
approach avoidance conflict
a conflict in which there are both appealing and negative aspects the the decision to be made
avoidance avoidance conflict
a conflict in which one has to choose between two equally unattractive options
multiple approach avoidance conflict
a conflict in which one must choose between options that have both many attractive and many negative aspects
stress
a physical and mental response to a challenging or threatening situation
stressor
a stressful stimulus, a condition demanding adaptation
traumatic stressor
a situation that threatens one's physical activity, arousing feelings of fear, horror, or helplessness
acute stress
a temporary pattern of stressor activated arousal with distinct onset and limited duration
chronic stress
continuous stressful arousal persisting over time
fight or flight response
sequence of internal processes preparing an organism for struggle or escape
general adaptation syndrome
pattern of general physical responses that take essentially the same form in responding to any serious chronic stress
alarm reaction
first stage of the GAS during which the body mobilizes its resources to cope with a stressor
stage of resistance
second stage of the GAS during which the body adapts to and uses resources to cope with a stressor
stage of exhaustion
third stage of the GAS during which the body depleates its resources in responding to an ongoing stressor
type a
behavior patternt characterized by intense, angry, competitive, or perfectionalistic responses to challenging situations
type b
behavior pattern characterized by relaxed, unstressed approach to life
learned helplessness
pattern of failure to respond to noxious stimuli after an organism learns its responses are ineffective
bulimia
eating disorder in which a person eats and then purges
anorexia
eating disorder in which a person does not eat enough