42 terms

Vocab Unit 1 & 2 (Powers)

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aegis
(noun) Protection; patronage;sponsorship
S: auspices
apprise
(verb) To inform of; to make aware of by giving oral or written notice.
S: acquaint, notify
A: keep secret, withhold information
bibulous
(adjective) Fond of or inclined to drink; absorbent
S: inebrious, alcoholic
A: teetotaling, abstemious, temperate
claque
(noun) A group of people hired to applaud a performer or performance; enthusisatic or fawning admirers; an opera hat.
S: fan club, flatterers, hangers-on
deracinate
(verb) To pull up by the roots; to root out, uproot, or dislocate; to elimate all traces of
S: extirpate, eradicate, expunge
A: implant, nurture, foster, instill
eleemosynary
(adjective) Charitable, dependent upon or supported by charity; derived from or provided by charity
S: philanthropic, beneficient
A: selfish, self-seeking, uncharitable
indigenous
(adjective) Originating in the country or region where found, native, inborn, inherent.
S: endemic, domestic, homegrown
A: foreign, alien, exoteric, imported
lachrymose
(adjective) Given to tears or weeping; causing to shed tears; mournful, lugubrious
S: tearful, doleful, dolorous
A: dry-eyed, cheerful, merry, hilarious
lexicon
(noun) A dictionary of a language; the special vocabulary of a person, group, or subject; a compendium
S: wordbook, glossary
melee
(noun) A confused struggle; a violent free-for-all; a tumultuous mingling
S: fracas, brawl, scuffle, donnybrook
A: friendly chat, peace and quiet
microcosm
(noun) A miniature world or universe; a group or system viewed as the model of a larger group or system.
S: epitome, world in little
A: universe, macrocosm, cosmos, totality
minuscule
(adjective) Very small, tiny
S: infinitesimal, insignificant
A: huge, massive, monumental
minuscle
(noun) A lowercase letter
obfuscate
(verb) To darken or obscure; to confuse or bewilder
S: muddy the waters
A: clarify, elucidate, explicate
paternalism
(noun) The policy or practice of treating or governing people in the manner of a father dealing with his children.
S: benevolence, solicitude, fatherliness
polarize
(verb) To cause to concentrate around two conflicting or contrasting positions; to cause light to vibrate in a pattern
S: split, divide, alienate, estrange
A: unite, unify, reconcile
purview
(noun) The range, extent, or scope of something; in law, the cope or limit of what is provided in a statute
S: jurisdiction, orbit
sanguine
(adjective) Having a ruddy complexion; of a naturally cheerful, confident, or optimistic outlook.
S: flushed, rosy
A: bloodless, ashen, pessimistic, gloomy
solecism
(noun) A substandard or ungrammatical usage; a breach of etiquette; any impropriety or mistake.
S: misusage, blunder, faux pas
A: correct usage
vassal
(noun) A person under the protection of a feudal lord to whom he or she owes allegaince; a subordinate or dependent; a servant
S: menial, minion
A: overlord
vassal
(adjective) Subservient
S: servile
versimilitude
(noun) The quality of appearing to be true, real, likely, or probable.
S: realism, lifelikeness, authenticity
adjunct
(n.) something added to something else as helpful or useful but not essential; an assistant or helper; a valuable quality or characteristic; (adj.) added or connected in a subordinate capacity' attached to a faculty or staff in an auxiliary capacity
SYNONYMS: (n.) associate, addition, accessory
bellwether
(n.) the male sheep that leads the flock to the slaughterhouse; a leader, as in a desperate or violent undertaking; an indicator of trends
SYNONYMS: ringleader, initiator, barometer
ANTONYMS: follower, imitator, emulator
caterwaul
(v.) to howl or screech like a cat; to quarrel; (n.) a harsh or noisy cry; a racket
SYNONYMS: (v.) whine; (n.) wail, screech
chimerical
(adj.) absurd; wildly fantastic; impossible
SYNONYMS: fanciful, visionary, quixotic, pie-in-the-sky
effete
(adj.) lacking in wholesome vigor or energy; worn-out or exhausted; sterile or unable to produce; out -of-date
SYNONYMS: decadent, enfeebled, outmoded
ANTONYMS: thriving, burgeoning, vigorous, dynamic
fait accompli
(n.) an accompished and presumably irreversible deed, fact, or action
hidebound
(adj.) narrow-winded and rigid, especially in opinions or prejudices; stubbornly and unthinkingly conservative
SYNONYMS: intolerant, inflexible
ANTONYMS: open-minded, tolerant, liberal, progressive
hierarchy
(n.) any system of things or people arranged or graded one above another in order of rank, wealth, class, etc.
SYNONYMS: chain of command, pecking order
liturgy
(n.) a religious service or rite; the form of a ritual or other act of public worship
SYNONYMS: ceremony, observance
mirage
(n.) something illusory, without substance, or without a basis in reality; an illusion
SYNONYMS: optical illusion
morass
(n.) a patch of low, soft, wet ground; a swamp; a confusing situation in which one is entrapped, as in quicksand
SYNONYMS: bog, quagmire
ANTONYMS: solid ground, bedrock, terra firma
noisome
(adj.) offensive or disgusting; foul-smelling; harmful or injurious
SYNONYMS: fetid, noxious, vile, loathsome
ANTONYMS: wholesome, pleasant, sweet-smelling
oblivious
(adj.) forgetful; unaware
SYNONYMS: insensible
ANTONYMS: aware, mindful, cognizant, alert
poltroon
(n.) a base coward
SYNONYMS: craven, dastard, "chicken"
ANTONYMS: hero, stalwart, gallant
proselyte
(n.) a convert; a disciple
SYNONYMS: novice, neophyte
ANTONYMS: master, teacher, guide, gru
quasi
(adj.) resembling but not actually being; seemingly but not actually or completely
SYNONYMS: kind of, semi-, as if
ANTONYMS: totally, completely, actually, in fact
raillery
(n.) good-humored ridicule; teasing
SYNONYMS: banter, persiflage
ribald
(adj.) irreverently mocking; coarse, vulgar, or indecent in language
SYNONYMS: bawdy, risque
ANTONYMS: seemly, proper, decorous
supine
(adj.) lying flat on one's back; listless or lethargic; apathetic or passive
SYNONYMS: prone, prostrate; inert
ANTONYMS: upright, erect, perpendicular, vertical
vignette
(n.) a short description or sketch; a picture of illustration with edges that gradually shade off; a decorative design on the title page of a book or at the beginning or end of a chapter
SYNONYMS: thumbnail sketch, anecdote
ANTONYMS: epic, full-length treatment