SNLA10 Academic vocabulary

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allegory
A narrative that serves as an extended metaphor. Allegories are written in the form of fables, parables, poems, stories, and almost any other style or genre. The main purpose of an allegory is to tell a story that has characters, a setting, as well as other types of symbols, which have both literal and figurative meanings.
allusion
A reference to a well-known person, place, event, literary work, or work of art
annotated bibliography
a bibliography that includes brief explanations or notes for each reference
antecdote
A short and amusing story about a real incident/person.
antecedent
Every pronoun refers back to a previous noun or pronoun
audience
those for whom a piece of writing is intended
author's purpose
the goal of the author; the reason the he/she has for writing. ( Inform, persuade, express opinion, evoke emotion, & entertain)
chorus
A group of characters in Greek tragedy (and in later forms of drama), who comment on the action of a play without participation in it.
clarify
(v) Make (a statement or situation) less confused and more comprehensible; explain
cognate
A word that looks like and is related to another word in a different language; having the same source, origin, or ancestor; similar in function and character
context analysis
This is a method of breaking down the meaning of a word (or phrase) by working with the text or passage in which the word is used.
denoument
the resolution of the conflict in a story's plot; a final outcome
derivation
The process of creating a new word from other words (usually by adding affixes)
dramatic irony
Irony that occurs when the meaning of the situation is understood by the audience but not by the characters in the play
editorial
A type of story which serves to express an opinion and encourage the reader to take some action.
ellipsis points
mark of punctuation that creates pauses or gaps in time; a series of three spaced periods that are used to show that material from a quotation or a quoted passage has been omitted
epiphany
A moment of sudden revelation or insight
epitome
A representative or perfect example of a class or type
ethics
A system of beliefs of what is right and what is wrong.
euphemism
An indirect, less offensive way of saying something that is considered unpleasant
explicit
Definite; stated in detail, leaving nothing to be guessed at; outspoken
exposition
A narrative device, often used at the beginning of a work that provides necessary background information about the characters and their circumstances.
extended metaphor
A metaphor that continues over a long span of time or throughout a piece of poetry.
farce
A comedy that contains an extravagant and nonsensical disregard of seriousness, although it may have a serious, scornful purpose.
fate
(adj.) determined in advance by destiny or fortune
foil
A character who is in most ways opposite to the main character (protagonist) or one who is nearly the same as the protagonist. The purpose of the foil character is to emphasize the traits of the main character by contrast only
implicit
IMPLIED; UNDERSTOOD BUT NOT STATED
limerick
A five line humorous poem in which lines 1, 2 and 5 rhyme and lines 3 and 4 rhyme.
metonymy
A figure of speech in which one word or phrase is substituted for another with which it is closely associated (such as "crown" for "royalty").
nuance
A subtle distinction or difference, as in meaning, feeling, or tone. The nuance of flavor cannot be described adequately.
oration
An address or formal speech given on a special occasion.
parable
A short tale that teaches a moral; similar to but shorter than an allegory
paradox
A statement that appears self-contradictory, but that reveals a kind of truth
persona
An individual's characteristic pattern of thinking, feeling, and acting.
perspective
A particular point of view
persuasive text
writing that tries to influence the reader to act or think in a certain way.
rebuttal
A counterargument, especially in debate
recursive
self-repeating: repeating itself, either indefinitely or until a specified point is reached
rhetoric
..., study of the technique and rules for using language effectively (especially in public speaking), using language effectively to please or persuade. (n) Effective or showy use of words
subgenre
a subcategory within a particular genre
syllogism
A form of reasoning in which two statements are made and a conclusion is drawn from them. A syllogism is the format of a formal argument that consists of a major premise, a minor premise, and a conclusion. Example: Major Premise: All tragedies end unhappily. Minor Premise: Hamlet is a tragedy. Conclusion: Therefore, Hamlet ends unhappily.
viewpoint
The bias from which something is told.
vocative
The words used to name or refer to people when talking to them.
voice
A writers distinctive use of language
paradigm
a standard or typical example.
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