50 terms

Manhattan GMAT Verbal Foundations - Vocab 2

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Deride
Mock, scoff at, laugh at contemptuously.
The manager really thought that deriding his employees as "stupid" or "lazy" would motivate them to work harder; instead, it motivated them to hide his office supplies.
Deterrent
Something that restrains or discourages
Some argue that the dealth penalty is deterrent to crime
Dichotomy
Division into two parts or into two contradictory groups
There is a dichotomy in the sciences between theoretical or "pure" sciences such as physics and chemistry, and the life sciences, which often deal more with classifying than with theorizing.
Discrete
Separate, distinct, detached, existing as individual parts
The advertising agency pitched us not on one campaign, but on three discrete ideas
Discriminating
Judicious, discerning, having good judgement or insight
Telling things apart - it is important to discriminate legitamate colleges from fradulent diploma mills
You can tell a real Prada bag by the discriminating mark on the inside
Disinterested
Unbiased, impartial; not interested. Don't confuse with uninterested, which means not interested, bored, apathetic.
Let's settle this argument once and for all! We'll get a disinterested observer to judge who can sing the highest note!
Dispatch
Speed, promptness (noun); send off or deal with in a speedy way (verb)
Ours messengers must approach every delivery with alacrity, care, and dispatch
Disseminate
Scatter, spread about, broadcast
Divest
Deprive or strip of a rank, etc., or of clothing or gear; to sell off holdings (oppoisite of invest)
She immediately divested by telling her broker to sell the stock
He was divested of his position on the board
Dovetail
Join or fit together
The two found that their careers dovetailed nicely
Dubious (adj)
Doubtful, Questionable, suspect
This applicant's resume is filled with dubious qualifications
Echelon
A level, rank, or grade
Upper echelon of executives
Eclectic
Selecting the best of everything or from many diverse courses
Eclectic taste is helpful in being a DJ
Effectively
It can also mean "in effect, but not offically"
He went on a two week vacation withouting asking for time off or even telling anyone he was leaving, thus effectively resigning from his position
Efficacy
The quality of being able to produce the intended effect
Something efficacious gets the job done; something efficient gets the job done without asting time or effort.
whether the drug's efficacy outweights the side effects
Egalitarian
Related to belief in the equality of all people
It is very rare taht someone turns down an offer to be knighted by the Queen of England; however, he was egalitarian enough to feel uncomfortable with the entire idea of titles and royalty
Emancipate
Free from slavery or oppression. Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation legally ended
slavery in the U.S. In law, to emancipate a minor is to declare the child (generally a teenager) no longer
under the control o f his or her parents.
Eminent
Prominent, distinguished, of high rank.
Empirical
Coming from, based on, or able to be verified by experience or experimentation; not
purely based on theory.
People always knew empirically that when you drop something, it falls to the ground; the theory
of gravity later explained why.
Emulate
Copy in an attempt to equal or be better than.
The ardent Star Trek fan emulated Captain Kirk in every way possible—his brash and confident
leadership might have gotten him somewhere, but the women he tried to impress weren't
so impressed.
M
Enigma
Puzzle, mystery, riddle; mysterious or contradictory person.
The enormous rock sculptures in Stonehenge, Scotland, are truly an enigma—were they created
as part of a religious observance, in deference to a great ruler, or for some other reason?
Enjoy
Of course, enjoy means "receive pleasure from," but it also means "benefit from." Thus, it is
not true that only people and animals can enjoy. For instance:
The college has long enjoyed the support of wealthy alumni.
Ensure vs. Insure
If you buy insurance for something, you have insured it. If you guarantee something,
you have ensured it.
If you go past this security checkpoint, I cannot ensure your safety.
Enumerate
Count or list; specify one-by-one.
The Bill of Rights enumerates the basic rights held by every citizen of the United States.
Equitable
Fair, equal, just.
As the university president was a heavily biased towards the sciences, faculty in the liberal arts
felt they had to fight to get an equitable share of funding for their departments.
Equivocal or Equivocate
Use unclear language to deceive or avoid committing to a position.
Not wanting to lose supporters, the politician equivocated on the issue, tossing out buzzwords
related to each side while also claiming more study was needed.
Erratic
Inconsistent, wandering, having no fixed course.
When someone engages in erratic behavior, family members often suspect drugs or mental illness.
However, sometimes the person is just building a top-secret invention in the garage!
Erroneous
Mistaken, in error.
Hilda was completely unable to assemble her new desk chair after the instructions erroneously
instructed her to screw the left armrest onto a small lever on the bottom o f the seat.
Erstwhile
Former, previous.
A novelist and erstwhile insurance salesman, he told us his story of the long road to literary
success, before he was able to quit his day job.
Escape velocity
The minimum velocity that an object must attain in order to completely escape a
gravitational field.
Estimable
1) Worthy o f esteem, admirable; 2) Able to be estimated.
As the first Black president of the Harvard Law Review, Barack Obama presented an estimable resume when he ran for president in 2008.
Riding a roller coaster is safer than driving on the highway, but there is still an estimable risk.
Ethos
The character, personality, or moral values specific to a person, group, time period, etc.
At the prep school, the young man happily settled into an ethos of hard work and rigorous athletic competition.
Exacerbate
Make worse (more violent, severe, etc.), inflame.
Allowing your band to practice in our garage has greatly exacerbated my headache.
Exacting
Very severe in making demands; requiring precise attention.
The boxing coach was exacting, analyzing Joeys footwork down to the millimeter and forcing him to repeat movements hundreds o f times until they were correct.
Exhaustive
Comprehensive, thorough, exhausting a topic or subject, accounting for all possibilities; draining, tending to exhaust.
The consultant s report was an exhaustive treatment of all possible options and their likely consequences. In fact, it was so exhaustive that the manager joked that he would need to hire
another consultant to read the first consultant s report.
Exotic
Foreign, intriguingly unusual or strange
Expansionist
Wanting to expand, such as by conquering other countries.
Expedient
Suitable, proper; effective (sometimes while sacrificing ethics).
"I need this report by 2pm, and I don't care what you have to do to make that happen," said the boss. "I expect you to deal with it expediently."
When invited to a wedding you cannot attend, it is expedient to send a gift.
Explicit
Direct, clear, fully revealed. Explicit in the context of movies, music, etc., means depicting or describing sex or nudity, but explicit can be used for anything {explicit instructions is a common phrase).
The antonym of explicit is implicit or tacit, meaning "hinted at, implied."
The goal of my motivational talk is to make explicit the connection between staying in school and avoiding a life o f crime.
Extraneous
Irrelevant; foreign, coming from without, not belonging.
This essay would be stronger if you removed extraneous information; this paragraph about the
authors life doesn't happen to be relevant to your thesis.
Maize, which originated in the New World, is extraneous to Europe.
Extrapolate
Conjecture about an unknown by projecting information about something known; predict by projecting past experience. In math and science, to extrapolate is to infer values in an unobserved
interval from values in an observed interval. For instance, from the points (1,4) and (3, 8), you could extrapolate the point (5, 12), since it would be on the same line.
No, I've never been to Bryn Mawr, but I've visited several small, private womens colleges in the Northeast, so I think I can extrapolate.
Faculty
An ability, often a mental ability. Most often used in the plural, as in A stroke can often deprive a person of important mental faculties. (Of course, faculty can also mean the teachers or professors of an institution o f learning.)
Fathom
Understand deeply.
I cannot even remotely fathom how you interpreted an invitation to sleep on my couch as permission to take my car on a six-hour joyride!
Fledgling
New or inexperienced. A fledgling is also a young bird that cannot fly yet.
The Society o f Engineers is available for career day presentations in elementary schools, where we hope to encourage fledgling talents in the applied sciences.
Fleeting
Passing quickly, transitory.
I had assumed our summer romance would be fleeting, so I was very surprised when you proposed marriage!
Foreshadow
Indicate or suggest beforehand.
You didn't know this was a horror movie? I thought it was pretty clear that the childrens ghost story around the campfire was meant to foreshadow the horrible things that would happen to them years later as teenagers at a motel in the middle of the woods.
Forestall
Delay, hinder, prevent by taking action beforehand.
Our research has been forestalled by a lack of funding; were all just biding our time while we wait for the university to approve our grant proposal.
Glacial
Slow, cold, icy, unsympathetic. Glacial can also just mean "related to glaciers."
Progress happened, but at a glacial pace everyone found frustrating.
He had wanted to appear on the reality singing competition his whole young life, but he was not encouraged by the judges' glacial response to his audition.
Graft
Join together plant parts or skin so that two living things grow together (for instance, a skin graft for a burn victim); or the act of acquiring money or other benefits through illegal means, especially by abusing one's power.
The part o f the book describing the financial crisis is good, but the "What You Can Do" section seems grafted on, almost as though written by a different author.
It's not cool for your boss to pressure you into buying Girl Scout cookies from his daughter. If she were selling something larger, we'd call that graft.
Grandstand
Perform showily in an attempt to impress onlookers.
I was really passionate about the candidate when he spoke at our school, but now that I think about it, he was just grandstanding.