50 terms

Manhattan GMAT Verbal Foundations - Vocab 5

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Terms in this set (...)

Psyche
The spirit or soul; the mind (as discussed in psychology). Pronounce this word "SY-key."
Qualified
Modified, limited, conditional on something else. Unqualified can mean not limited or not restrained. If your boss gives unqualified approval for your plan, you can do whatever you want. Of
course, everyone knows qualified in the sense of qualified for the job. Use context to determine which
meaning is intended. A qualified person is suitable or well-prepared for the job; a qualified statement or
feeling is held back or limited.
The scientist gave her qualified endorsement to the book, pointing out that, while it posed a credible theory, more research was still needed before the theory could be applied.
Radiometric, radioactive, carbon, or radiocarbon dating
Methods for determining the approximate
age of an ancient object by measuring the amount of radioactivity it contains.
Recalcitrant
Not obedient, resisting authority, hard to manage.
The aspiring kindergarten teacher was not prepared for a roomful of twenty recalcitrant children who wouldn't even sit down, much less learn the words to "Holding Hands Around the
World."
Recapitulate
Summarize, repeat in a concise way
I'm sorry I had to leave your presentation to take a call— I only have a minute, but can you recapitulate what you're proposing?
Receptive
Capable of or ready and willing to receive, as in receptive to a new idea.
Reconvene
Gather, come together again (or call together again), such as for a meeting, as in Let's break for lunch and reconvene at 1pm.
Redress
Setting something right after a misdeed, compensation or relief for injury or wrongdoing (noun); correct, set right, remedy (verb).
My client was an innocent victim of medical malpractice. As would anyone who had the wrong leg amputated in surgery, he is seeking financial redress.
Refute
Prove to be false.
She's not a very valuable member o f the debate team, actually—she loves making speeches, but she's not very good at refuting opponents' arguments.
Rehash
Discuss or bring up (an idea or topic) again without adding anything new.
We're not going to agree, so why rehash the issue?
Remedial
Providing a remedy, curative; correcting a deficient skill.
After harassment occurs in the workplace, it is important that the company takes remedial action right away, warning or firing the offender as appropriate, and making sure the complainant
s concerns are addressed.
For those who need remedial reading help, we offer a summer school program that aims to help students read at grade level.
Reminiscent
Looking back at the past, reminding of the past. A reminiscent person is remembering;
an old-fashioned object could be reminiscent of an earlier time.
Render
Give, submit, surrender; translate; declare formally; cause to become. To render harmless is simply to make harmless.
When you render your past due payments, we will turn your phone back on.
Only in her second year of Japanese, she was unable to render the classic poem into English. The judge rendered a verdict that rendered us speechless.
Respectively
In the order given. This is a very useful word! The sentence "Smith and Jones wrote the books 7 Success Tips and Productivity Rocks' is ambiguous—did they work together on both or did they each write one o f the books? "Smith and Jones wrote the books 7 Success Tips and Productivity Rocks,
respectively" answers the question—Smith wrote 7 Success Tips and Jones wrote Productivity Rocks. The
word is typically used to match up two things to two other things, in the same order.
His poems "An Ode to the Blossoms of Sheffield" and "An Entreaty to Ladies All Too Prim" were written in 1756 and 1758, respectively.
Reticent
Not talking much; private (of a person), restrained, reserved.
She figured that, to rise to the top, it was best to be reticent about her personal life; thus, even her closest colleagues were left speculating at the water cooler about whether her growing belly actually indicated a pregnancy she simply declined to mention to anyone.
Revamp
Renovate, redo, revise (verb); a restructuring, upgrade, etc. (noun). Similarly, overhaul means to repair or investigate for repairs.
Rife
Happening frequently, abundant, currently being reported.
Reports o f financial corruption are rife.
Rudimentary
Elementary, relating to the basics; undeveloped, primitive.
My knowledge of Chinese is quite rudimentary—I get the idea of characters and I can order food, but I really cant read this document youve just given me.
Sanction
Permission or approval, or to give permission or approval OR a legal action by one or more countries against another country to get it to comply (or the act of placing those sanctions on another
country). Whoa! Yes, that's right—sanction can mean two different things that are basically opposites.
Use context to figure it out—if it's plural (sanctions)y it's definitely the bad meaning.
Professional boxers may only fight in sanctioned matches—fighting outside the ring is prohibited.
Satire
Literary device in which foolishness or badness is attacked through humor, irony, or making fun of.
Save
But or except. As a verb, o f course, save means keep safe, store up, set aside. But as a preposition or conjunction, save can be used as follows:
All o f the divisions o f the company are profitable save the movie-rental division. (This means that the movie-rental division was not profitable.)
He would have been elected president, save for the scandal that derailed his campaign at the last minute. (Here, save means except.)
Scant
not enough or barely enough. Scanty is used in the same way (both are adjectives).
The new intern was scant help at the conference—he disappeared all day to smoke and didn't seem to realize that he was there to assist his coworkers.
The soldiers were always on the verge of hunger, complaining about their scanty rations.
Scarcely
Hardly, barely, by a small margin. Sometimes the adjective scarce is used where it sounds like the adverb scarcely is needed. This is an idiomatic usage:
She lived a lavish lifestyle she could scarce afford.
Semantic
Relating to the different meanings of words or other symbols.
Bob said plastic surgery should be covered under the health care plan and Marion said it shouldn't, but it turns out that their disagreement was purely semantic—what Bob meant was
reconstructive surgery and what Marion meant was cosmetic surgery.
Settled
Fixed, established, concluded. Sediment can settle in water, people who marry can settle down, and a settled judgment is one that has been firmly decided.
Siphon
Tube for sucking liquid out of something (some people steal gasoline from other people's cars by siphoning it). To siphon funds is to steal money, perhaps in a continuous stream.
Skeptical
Doubting, especially in a scientific way (needing sufficient evidence before believing).
Don't confuse skeptical and cynical (thinking the worst of others' motivations; bitterly pessimistic).
In a GMAT Reading Comprehension passage, an author might be skeptical (a very appropriate attitude for a scientist, for instance), but would never be cynical.
Sketchy
Like a sketch: incomplete, imperfect, superficial.
Skirt
Border, lie along the edge of, go around; evade.
Melissa spent all of Thanksgiving skirting the issue of who she was dating and when she might get married.
The creek skirts our property on the west, so it's easy to tell where our farm ends.
Slew
A large number or quantity. O f course, slew is also the past tense of slay (kill), so you could actually say She slew him with a slew of bullets.
Slight
Small, not very important, slender or delicate; treat as though not very important; snub, ignore; a discourtesy.
She was very sensitive, always feeling slighted and holding a grudge against her coworkers for a
variety o f slights, both real and imagined.
Natalie Portman has always been slight, but she became even thinner to portray a ballerina in Black Swan.
Smelt
Fuse or melt ore in order to separate out metal.
Sparing
Holding back or being wise in the use of resources; deficient. Be sparing with the ketchup in order to make it last longer, but don't be sparing in praising your employees for a job well done.
Spate
Sudden outpouring or rush; flood.
After a brief spate of post-exam partying, Lola is ready for classes to begin again.
Spearhead
Be the leader of. A spearhead can, of course, be the sharp head of a spear. It can also be a person at the front o f a military attack, or a leader of anything.
Lisa agreed to spearhead the "healthy office" initiative, and was instrumental in installing two treadmills and getting healthy food stocked in the vending machines.
Staggered
Starting and ending at different times, especially also occurring in overlapping intervals.
(Of course, you can also stagger around drunk, weaving from side to side.)
Employees who work on staggered schedules may only see each other for part o f the day.
Static
Fixed, not moving or changing, lacking vitality. Stasis is the quality of being static.
The anthropologist studied a society in the Amazon that had been deliberately static for hundreds of years— the fiercely proud people disdained change, and viewed all new ideas as inferior to the way o f life they had always practiced.
Stratum
One of many layers (such as in a rock formation or in the classes of a society). The plural is strata.
From overhearing his rich and powerful passengers' conversations, the chauffeur grew to despise the upper stratum of society.
I love this dish—it's like a lasagna, but with strata made of bread, eggs, and pancetta! Oh, look at the menu—it's actually called a strata! That makes perfect sense.
Subjective
Existing in the mind or relating to one's own thoughts, opinions, emotions, etc.; personal, individual, based on feelings
We can give names to colors, but we can never quite convey the subjective experience of them—what if my "red" is different from your "red"?
Subjugation
Conquering, domination, enslavement.
Subset
A set that is contained within a larger set.
Subvert
Overthrow, corrupt, cause the downfall of.
Succeeding
Coming after or following. The succeeding sentence is simply the sentence that comes after.
After the sale of the company, you will receive 5% of the profits from the current year, and 1% in all succeeding years.
In 1797, George Washington was succeeded by John Adams.
Suffrage
The right to vote. Womens suffrage was ensured in the U.S. via the 19th Amendment.
Suppress
Prohibit, curtail, force the end of. A repressive government might suppress dissent against its
policies.
Surge
Sudden, transient increase (power surge), heavy swelling motion like that of waves. A surge of troops is sending a lot of soldiers at once. A surge in interest is sudden.
Syntax
The rules governing grammar and how words join to make sentences (or how words and symbols join in writing computer code), the study of these rules, or any system or orderly arrangement.
Now that my linguistics class is studying syntax, it makes a little more sense when my computer flashes "SYNTAX ERROR" at me.
Anyone learning a language is bound to make syntactical mistakes—even if he or she knows the appropriate vocabulary, it is still difficult to assemble the words perfectly.
Synthesis
Combining o f complex things to create a unified whole.
Table
In American English, to table something means to postpone discussion of it until later. (In British English, to table a bill is the opposite—to submit it for consideration.)
I see were not going to agree on whether to scrap our entire curriculum and develop a new one, so let s table that discussion and move on to voting on the budget.
Taxonomy
Science or technique of classification. The taxonomic system in biology classifies organisms by Phylum, Class, Order, Species, etc.