32 terms

Manhattan GMAT Verbal Foundations - Vocab 6

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Terms in this set (...)

Temperance
Moderation, self-control, especially regarding alcohol or other desires or pleasures; total abstinence from alcohol. Relatedly, temperate means moderate, as in a temperate climate.
After the end of the Civil War, economic change led to an increase in alcohol problems and the birth o f the Temperance Movement, which ultimately led to Prohibition.
Grandma is a model of temperance—she drinks red wine every night, but only the one-third of a glass that she read was the minimum amount needed to help prevent heart attacks.
Terrestrial
Relating to the Earth or to land; worldly.
Mr. and Mrs. Daruza were certain they had seen a UFO, plus aliens running around in the night. What they really saw was an especially dense flock of birds in the air, and some mundane,
terrestrial animals on the ground.
Thenceforth
From that time forward.
In 1956, Grace Kelly married Rainier III, Prince of Monaco, and was thenceforth known as Princess Grace.
Theoretically
In theory (but not necessarily in reality). People sometimes just say theoretically when talking about theories, but they also often say it when they mean that something will not work in real
life.
Theoretically, the new process will result in reduced particle emission. (This could mean, "So we will need to try it in order to find out," or it could mean "But I doubt that it will really
work." You need the next sentence to know which meaning is intended.)
Thesis
Proposition supported by an argument.
Thorny
Controversial, full o f difficulties. Literally, having thorns, prickly (as a rose bush).
Tides
Periodic rise and fall of the ocean about every 12 hours, caused by the attraction of the Sun and moon. Metaphorically, you can say the tides of refugees, for instance—implying the refugees are arriving periodically, in large groups.
Token
Sign, symbol, mark, badge; souvenir, memento; sample, or person, thing, idea taken to represent an entire group. Of course, a token can also be a coin-like disk used as currency for subways, arcade games, etc. As an adjective, it means "not very important."
I am starting to realize that this law firm hired me to be its token woman. There I am, smiling in all the ads—but I never actually get to work on important cases.
Hollywood movies are often guilty of tokenism—many have exacdy one black character (the "token minority"), often present to give advice to the (usually white) main characters.
I am giving you this "Best Friends Forever" necklace as a token of our friendship.
Trajectory
The curved path of an object in flight, as in the missile's trajectory.
Transient
Moving around, not settled; temporary, not lasting.
In the last decade, podcasting was thought to be the "next big thing," but it turned out to be a largely transient phenomenon.
Transmute
Transform, change from one form to another.
Transplantation
Moving from one place to another. Certainly you have heard of a heart transplant, for instance. It can also be used metaphorically: a person who has just moved to a new state might refer to herself as a transplant from Texas.
Truce or Armistice
Suspension of fighting for a specified period because o f mutual agreement; ceasefire.
After the earthquake, the two warring nations agreed to a truce and sent their soldiers to help the quakes victims.
Undergird
Strengthen, support. To undergird an argument is to make it stronger—the opposite of undermine!
Undermine
Weaken, cause to collapse by digging away at the foundation (of a building or an argument);
injure or attack in a secretive or underhanded way.
Rather than searching impartially for the truth, these pharmaceutical company "scientists" willfully ignored any evidence that undermined the conclusion they were being paid to produce.
You are nice to my face, but you are undermining me behind my back, suggesting to others in the office that I am making mistakes in my work and that you have been fixing them!
Underpin
Strengthen, corroborate, support from below.
Her argument was underpinned with the results of several recent studies.
Underscore
Emphasize (or, literally, to underline text).
"You re not going to mess with Joey anymore," said Joey. His new bodyguards stepped forward threatening, as though to underscore Joeys point.
Undifferentiated
Not distinguished from one another, the same.
M A
Unfettered
Free, liberated.
Unprecedented
Never before known or seen, without having happened previously.
When Nixon resigned, American bravado was at an all-time low—the resignation of a sitting president was disgraceful and unprecedented.
Unforeseeable
Not able to be predicted.
Our company had disaster insurance and a succession plan in case something happened to the
president, but we had no plans for the unforeseeable circumstance that our office would be
completely overtaken by rats.
Untempered
Not toned down; not moderated, controlled, or counterbalanced. Often untempered by.
I wouldn't call it "tough love"—his harshness is untempered by any kind of affection.
The report was an untempered condemnation of the company's practices—the investigators didn't have a single good thing to say.
Untenable
Not defendable (as an argument), not able to be lived in (as a house).
GMAT Critical Reasoning is full of untenable arguments that rest upon unproven assumptions.
Unwarranted
Not justified or authorized.
Utopian
Related to ideals o f perfection; unrealistically idealistic.
Reducing homelessness to zero is a utopian goal, but our agency views reducing the street population by 25% and getting children off the streets as more practical aims.
Via
Through, by means of, by way of (by a route that goes through or touches). Per can also be used in this way.
We will be flying to Russia via Frankfurt.
Many of the students at our college got here via special programs that assist low-income students in preparing for college.
Wanting
Lacking, insufficient, or not good enough (as in, I read the book andfound it wanting). This makes sense when you think about the fact that people generally want good things, of course—so if a person is left wanting, he did not get those good things. Conversely, a person who wants for nothing is
someone who already has everything.
Warranted
Justified, authorized (warrant can mean to justify or a justification, but it can also mean to vouch for or guarantee).
The pundit's comments don t even warrant a response from our organization—they were mere name-calling, not suitable for public discourse.
Your criticism of Anne is unwarranted—as your assistant, she has done everything you've asked her to do.
He doesn't have his documents with him, but I'll warrant that he is indeed a certified forklift operator.
Whereas
While on the contrary, considering that.
Mr. Katsoulas had always assumed his son would take over the family buiness, whereas his son had always assumed he would go away to college and never come back.
Whereas squash and peppers are vegetables, a tomato is technically a fruit.
Whet
Stimulate, make keen or eager (especially of an appetite).
Dinner will take another twenty minutes, but maybe this cheese plate can whet your appetite?
Winnow
Sift, analyze critically, separate the useful part from the worthless part.
We got 120 resumes for one job—it's going to take me awhile just to winnow this down to a reasonable stack of people we want to interview.
Yoke
A frame for attaching animals (such as oxen) to each other and to a plow or other equipment to be pulled, or a bar across a person's shoulders to help carry buckets of water, etc. Metaphorically, a yoke
is a burden or something that oppresses. To yoke is to unite together or to burden. To throw off the yoke of oppression is to free oneself from oppression.
The speaker argued that humanity had traded the yoke o f servitude to kings and tyrants for the yoke of consumerism, which enslaves us just as much in the end.