64 terms

Personal selling chapter 4

STUDY
PLAY

Terms in this set (...)

Encoding
Translation of thoughts into words
Decoding
Interpreting the meaning of the received message
Feedback
Reply to the message
1. Environment in which the communications occur
2. Buyers do not always follow this communication model perfectly
Encoding and decoding problems (2)
1. noises
2. Physical comfort
Problems with the Environment in which the communications occur(2)
noises
Sounds unrelated to messages being exchanged
1. Choice of words
- Use short words and phrases to:
- Demonstrate strength and force
-Provide charm and grace
2. Avoid
- Trite words
- Phrases that sound overeager
- Off-color language
- Slang or foul language
3. Draw on a set of words to best help present the features of a product or service
4. Do not use words that have become common and meaningless
5. Use culture specific words
Sending Verbal Messages Effectively (5)
1. Choice of words
2. voice characteristics
3. Stories
4. Keep open lines of communication
Sending Verbal Messages Effectively
1. Use short words and phrases to:
- Demonstrate strength and force
-Provide charm and grace
2. Avoid
- Trite words
- Phrases that sound overeager
- Off-color language
- Slang or foul language
3. Draw on a set of words to best help present the features of a product or service
4. Do not use words that have become common and meaningless
5. Use culture specific words
choice of words (5)
1. rate of speech
2. Loudness
3. inflection
4. Articulate
voice characteristics (4)
- Faster rate for simple messages
- Slower rate for more difficult concepts
rate of speech
Loudness
Should be tailored to the communication situation
inflection
Tone or pitch of speech
Articulate
Production of recognizable sounds
1. Conflicts, trials, and crises
2. Help listener think through choices and outcomes of those decisions
3. Word picture
4. Analogy
Stories (4)
Word picture
Graphic or vivid story designed to help the buyer easily visualize a point
Analogy
Speaker attempts to draw a parallel between one thing and another
Listening - 80 percent of the time
Talking - 20 percent or less of the time
80-20 listening rule
Speaking-listening differential
Difference between the rate at which people speak and listen
1. Hearing
2. Passive listening
3. Active listening
3 levels of listening
Hearing
- Tuning in and tuning out
- Mainly paying attention to yourself
- Not responding to the speaker
- Often just pretending to listen
Passive listening
- Not making a great effort to understand what the speaker is trying to convey
- Not listening to the deeper meaning of what the speaker is saying
- More concerned with content of the message than the speaker's feelings
- Speaker may think the listener is really listening
Active listening
- Actively tries to put self in the speaker's place
- Sees things from the speaker's point of view, including feelings
- Reading speaker's body language carefully
- Avoids all distractions
1. Think about the conclusions toward which the speaker is building
2. Evaluate the evidence being presented
3. Sort out important facts from irrelevant ones
4. Attempt to draw out as much information as possible
Active Listening (4)
1. Repeating information
-- To verify information being collected
2. Restating or rephrasing information
-- To verify a customer's intent
3. Clarifying information
-- To verify a customer's meaning
4. Summarizing the conversation
-- To get a quick review
5. Tolerating silences
-- To give customer time to think
6. Concentrating on the ideas being communicated
-- To avoid getting distracted
Suggestions for active listening (6)
1. Body language
2. Space
3. Appearance
Reading Nonverbal Messages from Customers (3)
1. Body angle
2. Face
3. Arms
4. Hands
5. Legs
Reading Nonverbal Messages from Customers (5)
1. uncrossed arms and legs
2. leaning forward
3. Smiling or pleasant expression
4. nodding
5. contemplative posture
6. Eye contact
Positive signs of nonverbal reaction patterns to presentation (7)
1. crossed arms and legs
2. leaning backwards or tuning away from you
3. Furrowed brow, pursed lips, frowning
4. shaking head
5. fidgeting, distracted
6. no eye contacted
7. little change in expression, lifeless
Negative signs of nonverbal reaction patterns to presentation (7)
1. Contradictions and verbal mistakes
2. Differences in two parts of a conversation
3. Contradictions between verbal and nonverbal messages
4. Nonverbal signals
Body Language patterns, signals that customers may be hiding their true feelings
1. Facial muscles - Involuntary, especially during stressful situations
2. Eye contact
3. Gestures and hand shaking
4. Posture and body movements
Sending Messages with Nonverbal Communication using body language
1. intimate zone
2. personal zone
3. social zone
4. Public zone
distance zones (4)
intimate zone
For a person's closest relationships (0-2 ft)
personal zone
For close friends and those who share special interests (2-4 ft)
social zone
For business transactions and other impersonal relationships (4-12 ft)
Public zone
For speeches, teachers in classrooms, and passersby (12 ft)
1. contact
2. non-contact
Buyers fall into two touching groups about space and physical contact
contact
See noncontact people as cold and unfriendly
non- contact
View contact people as overly friendly and obtrusive
1. Consider the geography
2. Consider customers
3. Consider corporate culture
4. Consider aspirations
5. Consider personal style
Principles to Dress for Success (5)
1. Temperature
2. Local cultural norms
Dressing Consider the geography (2)
1. Their appearance
2. Their expectations of your appearance
Dressing Consider customers (2)
Norms for your industry
Dressing Consider corporate culture
1. Top levels of your organization
2. Dress above your position
Dressing Consider aspirations (2)
1. Wait until you have the halo effect
2. Be reasonable
Dressing Consider personal style (2)
1. face-to-face
2. telephone
response time that is fast (2)
1. voice mail
2. fax
3. email
response time that is slow (3)
1. face-to-face
2. telephone
3. voicemail
salesperson can use verbal communication (3)
1. face-to-face
2. telephone
salesperson can hear buyer's verbal communication (2)
face-to-face
Salesperson can read buyers nonverbal communications
face-to face
highest quantity of information seller can send
voicemail
lowest quantity of information seller can send
telephone
average quantity of information seller can send
1. fax
2. email
varies quantity of information seller can send (2)
face-to-face
highest quantity of information buyer can send
telephone
average quantity of information buyer can send
1. voicemail
2. fax
3. email
no quantity of information buyer can send (3)
1. Decide what to say before calling
2. Be polite, enthusiastic, and an active listener
3. Take notes and restate the message
4. Encourage two-way communication with verbal cues
5. Give customer opportunity to ask questions
Telephone Communications (5)
1. When cold calling, set up an appointment, don't leave a message
2. Leave a clear, concise message including a suggested time for a return call
3. Avoid wasting the prospect's time and ask for a callback
4. Give name and phone number at the end of the message
Voice Mail Communications (4)
1. Immediacy does not mean intimacy
2. Use meaningful subject lines
3. Put important information in the first few lines
4. Be careful of the tone or intent of e-mail
5. Learn customer preferences for email
6. Avoid techno overkill
7. Avoid sending long e-mail messages or large attachments
8. Use speed to impress customers
9. Do not deliver bad news via e-mail
10. Check for timing before sending an e-mail
E-mail Communication suggestions (10)
1. Share content
2. Interact
3. Develop communities around similar interests
4. Salespeople use it to communicate with customers and prospects
Use of Web tools that allow users to (ex. social networking) (4)
1. Fill out your profile completely to build trust and establish common bonds
2. Create contacts/friends lists
3. Follow all rules for the networking sites
4. Share articles and links to presentations and other information that might be helpful to prospects
5. Remember to post updates on your wall about your business
6. Combine your social media accounts
7. Respond quickly to posts and queries
8. Add your Facebook/LinkedIn URL to your e-mail signature
Social Networking suggestions (8)
1. Use common English words
2. Use words that do not have multiple meanings
3. Avoid slang expressions peculiar to American culture
4. Use rules of grammar strictly
5. Use action-specific verbs
6. Never use vulgar expressions
Rules for using English in international selling (6)
1. Terms have different meanings in different cultures
2. Varying perceptions of time in general
--Time it takes for business activities to occur in different countries
3. Level of eye contact to be used
Considerations for international salespeople (3)