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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Atchafalaya Delta
  2. Scotch-Irish
  3. French
  4. mudlump
  5. Geography
  1. a ___ may be considered in physical and cultural (or human) terms.
  2. b Today the ___ is over 76 square miles and growing. It is an exception to the coastal erosion on other places in the Deltaic Plain and Chenier Plain.
  3. c New Orleans was established by ___ settlers over forty years before the Acadians arrived in South Louisiana.
  4. d Also pioneers, many of these Celtic people came to north Louisiana to grow cotton before the Civil War
  5. e A ___ is made of clay forced to the surface of the earth by the weight of sediments.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. The older part of Louisiana, formed during the Mesozoic (250 m.y.a. to 65 m.y.a.) and Cenozoic Eras (65 m.y.a to the present).
  2. The ___ Entrenchment is the soil deposited around 18,000 years ago when the ice age caused the sea level to drop. The ___ Entrenchment is around 400 feet below the present sea level.
  3. A twenty mile wide strip along the Gulf Coast from Marsh Island to the Sabine River.
  4. Many in New Orleans, slave and free, worked on the docks and as laborers. Some were entrepreneurs and musicians.
  5. Also known as "human geography," ___ geography discusses the human aspects of a place.

5 True/False questions

  1. meandersThe snake-like turns in the Mississippi River are called ___. They are common to old rivers. ___ form as the river slows and silt is deposited.

          

  2. tradeThe ___ River is currently a tributary of the Mississippi River, but in the past has gone straight to the Gulf of Mexico.

          

  3. FrenchThe non-Acadian ___ were the first European settlers of south Louisiana. They came to trade for pelts with the Native Americans and grow sugar cane.

          

  4. lobesThe ___ are deltas formed as the Mississippi River switched its route to the Gulf.

          

  5. African-AmericansMany in New Orleans, slave and free, worked on the docks and as laborers. Some were entrepreneurs and musicians.