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18 terms

Sociology: the family and religion

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religion
an institutionalized system of symbols, beliefs, values, and practices by which a group of people interprets and responds to what they feel is sacred and that provides answers to questions of ultimate meaning
sacred
set apart from ordinary activity for worship, seen as holy, and protected by special rites and rituals
profane
of the everyday world, specifically not religious
totem
an object or living thing that a religious group regards with special reverence
secular beliefs
the ordinary beliefs of everyday life; may be institutionalized but are specifically not religious
religiosity
the intensity and consistency of practice of a person's (or group's) faith
monotheism
the worship of a single god
polytheism
the worship of more than one deity
patriarchal religions
those in which the beliefs and practices of the religion are based on male power and authority
matriarchal religions
based on the centrality of female goddesses, who may be seen as the source of food, nurturance, and love, or who may serve as emblems of the power of women
religious rituals
symbolic activities that express a group's spiritual convictions
collective consciousness
the body of beliefs common to a community or society that gives people a sense of belonging
protestant ethic
hard work and self-denial will lead to salvation and to the accumulation of capital
religious extremism
actions and beliefs that are driven by high levels of religious intolerance
churches
formal organizations that tend to see themselves, and are seen by society, as the primary and legitimate religious institutions. Tend to be integrated into the secular world to a degree that sects and cults are not
sect
group that has broken off from an established church; emerge when a faction within an established religion questions the legitimacy or purity of the group from which they are separating
cult
religious group devoted to a specific cause or charismatic leader; many arise within established religions and sometimes continue to peaceably reside within the parent religion simply as a fellowship of people with a particular, often mystical dogma
charisma
quality attributed to individuals believed by their followers to have special powers