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CAADC PRACTICE EXAM

Terms in this set (203)

This test was developed by Aaron Beck to assess depression and, in conjunction with the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), to gauge the likelihood of suicide. While research indicates that no mental health professionals have ever actually devised an accurate predictor of physical violence either to oneself or others, the Beck instrument is commonly used for clinical assessment and research. The Beck Depression and Hopelessness Survey contains 22 items for the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and 20 items for the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS). The survey is administered and interpreted by computer, so it can be administered to a group. It is geared to adults 17 years of age or older who have at least a 5th grade reading level. There is an examiner who introduces the test and while it is not timed, it generally takes 10-20 minutes to complete. One of the problems with the test is the ease with which it is subject to conscious exaggeration and voluntary manipulation on the part of the subject.

The Beck Depression Inventory was revised in 1971 with 21 items and introduced at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School Center for Cognitive Therapy. Based on clinical observations and self descriptions by depressed psychiatric patients, it has replaced the original BDI (1961) and is used to evaluate seriousness of depression in adolescents and adults. It is intended to be used for patients who have been psychiatrically diagnosed with depression, but is of general use in identifying symptoms of depression in normal individuals.

Beck's Depression Scale has a range of 0-63, with 0-9=normal, 10-18=mild, 19-29=moderate to severe, and 30-63=serious depression. It is most helpful when used in clinical settings and for patients diagnosed with depression as a primary diagnosis. Other psychiatric disorders may present serious complications in terms of this assessment tool, so it is highly recommended that it not be used to diagnose other psychological disorders.
This test was developed by Aaron Beck to assess depression and, in conjunction with the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), to gauge the likelihood of suicide. While research indicates that no mental health professionals have ever actually devised an accurate predictor of physical violence either to oneself or others, the Beck instrument is commonly used for clinical assessment and research. The Beck Depression and Hopelessness Survey contains 22 items for the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and 20 items for the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS). The survey is administered and interpreted by computer, so it can be administered to a group. It is geared to adults 17 years of age or older who have at least a 5th grade reading level. There is an examiner who introduces the test and while it is not timed, it generally takes 10-20 minutes to complete. One of the problems with the test is the ease with which it is subject to conscious exaggeration and voluntary manipulation on the part of the subject.

The Beck Depression Inventory was revised in 1971 with 21 items and introduced at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School Center for Cognitive Therapy. Based on clinical observations and self descriptions by depressed psychiatric patients, it has replaced the original BDI (1961) and is used to evaluate seriousness of depression in adolescents and adults. It is intended to be used for patients who have been psychiatrically diagnosed with depression, but is of general use in identifying symptoms of depression in normal individuals.

Beck's Depression Scale has a range of 0-63, with 0-9=normal, 10-18=mild, 19-29=moderate to severe, and 30-63=serious depression. It is most helpful when used in clinical settings and for patients diagnosed with depression as a primary diagnosis. Other psychiatric disorders may present serious complications in terms of this assessment tool, so it is highly recommended that it not be used to diagnose other psychological disorders.
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