MTEL - SEI Bootcamp RPC

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Terms in this set (...)

Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) - What is it?
Sheltered Content Instruction + English as a Second Language. Inclusion model, NOT bilingual education.
Title III of No Child Left Behind - "English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement Act" - What is its purpose?
Ensures that LEP attain proficiency and meet state standards in content-area classes
Chapter 71A of the Massachusetts General Laws - What is its purpose?
Ballot Question #2 (2002). Mandates Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) in schools
BICS - What is it?
Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills - communication on bus or playground, 6mo-2years to fluency.
CALP - What is it?
Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency - language to be successful in class. Requires specific teaching, 5-7 years to be fluent.
SIFE - What is it?
Student w/Interrupted Formal Education - 1) 2+ years interrupted education in home country, 2) students who have attended school in US, gone home, come back, 3) students who have jumped between L1 and L2 instruction, 4) students with ineffective instruction in US schools, 5) studens who have moved schools often.
SIFE - What are examples of supportive strategies?
supportive environments (bilingual staff, buddies), access to resources, adaptive materials, intensive literacy/language instruction, teach learning strategies for future use, activate prior knowledge, print-rich environment, hands-on learning, checks for communication, multiple opportunities to demonstrate understanding, collaborative groups, reading strategies, graphic organizers, high but realistic expectations
Newcomers - What are examples of supportive strategies?
Explicit about the rules of school
Migrants - What are examples of supportive strategies?
Welcome families, create a list of resources, encourage academic success.
Refugees - What are examples of supportive strategies?
Learn about students, integrate culture and country into classroom routines, increase exposure to language, pair with trained buddies
W-APT (WIDA ACCESS Placement Test) - What is the purpose?
Determine ELL eligibility for SEI/ESL services - any student who speaks another language as indicated on the Home Language Survey is screened.
WIDA Model (assessment) - What is the purpose?
Monitors ELL student progress
ACCESS for ELLs (assessment) - What is it/what is the purpose?
Yearly Standardized Test to measure ELL student progress
WIDA Features of Academic Language - "word" - What is it?
like "bricks". Increasing specificity of language
WIDA Features of Academic Language - "sentence" - What is it?
"How we put words together." Increased complexity of sentence length and variety
WIDA Features of Academic Language - "discourse" - What is it?
"How we arrange sentences to create more comprehension." Increased complexity and accuracy of oral and written discourse.
WIDA Performance Level 1 Entering - How do you recognize an L1?
(Word) pictures or graphics, (sentence) chunks of language, one-step commands, (discourse) errors impede meaning of basic oral commands & simple statements
WIDA Performance Level 2 Beginning - How do you recognize an L2?
(Word) general language, (sentence) phrases & short sentences, (discourse) errors impede meaning of multiple-step commands
WIDA Performance Level 3 Developing - How do you recognize an L3?
(Word) general & some specific language, (sentence) expanded sentences oral or written, (discourse) errors impede communication but not as much meaning
WIDA Performance Level 4 Expanding - How do you recognize an L4?
(Word) specific & technical language, (sentence) varying sentence lengths and complexity in related paragraphs, (discourse) minimal errors that do not impede meaning.
WIDA Performance Level 5 Bridging - How do you recognize an L5?
(Word) specialized technical language, (sentence) varying sentence lengths and complexity in essays reports, (discourse) approaches English-proficient peers
WIDA Performance Level 6 Reaching - How do you recognize an L6?
(Word) specialized technical language at grade level, (sentence) varying sentence lengths and complexity in extended oral or written, (discourse) comparable to English-proficient peers
Phonology - definition
Organization of sounds in language
Phoneme - definition
Smallest unit of speech that can be used to make one word different from another word (p d b t: pad, pat, bad, bat)
Phonemic awareness - definition
Understanding that spoken words are made up of separate sound units that can be manipulated (blended, separated, combined)
Phonics - What does this mean for ELLs?
ELLs who know about phonics in their native language can transfer this skill into English - can be used with older ELLs to help decode text. ELLs who have poor literacy skills in their native language should only be taught phonics as needed and always in context of what they are reading.
Morpheme - definition & examples
Smallest meaningful unit in language (examples: roots, prefixes, suffixes)
Fluency - definition & implication for ELLs
Rapid word and word group recognition - students spend less time decoding and more time on meaning. ELLs need familiarity with sounds and spelling of English to become fluent. Teachers should provide a variety of readings to better determine student fluency.
Semantics - definition
Word meanings
Syntax - definition
Arrangements of words and phrases to create sentences.
Discourse - definition & implication for ELLs
The use of words to exchange thoughts and ideas - ELLs need instruction to analyze language structures of academic oral and written language functions
Pragmatics - definition & implication for ELLs
The ways in which context contributes to meaning - "social language". Teachers should help facilitate ELLs sense of finding the socially appropriate language. "Secret rules of English".
OR Strategy - 1) Write a Content Objective - What do you need to remember about writing an objective?
Keep it SIMPLE and MEASUREABLE. (Examples: define, identify, lower on Bloom's)
OR Strategy - 2) Analysis of Vocabulary - How do you analyze vocabulary?
Identify Tier 1, 2 and 3 vocabulary words. Mark polysemous words with a (p).
Polysemous words - What are they?
Words that have more than one meaning.
Tier 1 Vocabulary Words - What are they?
Basic everyday words that most children know in L1. Rarely have multiple meanings or require explicit teaching. Words you "learn when you go to another country". (Ex: book, girl, sad, run, dog, orange)
Tier 2 Vocabulary Words - What are they?
Extended (Academic) Words that are essential to comprehension. High frequency across domains, polysemous, increased specificity and descriptiveness, such as idioms, cognates, clusters. Most important for direct instruction. (Ex: measure, fortunate, industrious)
Tier 3 Vocabulary Words - What are they?
Expert Words that are low frequency, content-specific, glossed in the back of a textbook (Ex: isotope, oligarchy, crepe)
OR Strategy - 3a) Sentence-Level Analysis: Types and variety of Grammatical Structures - What to do?
Look for verbs, pronouns, word order, sentence structure, syntax. Example: pronoun tracking
OR Strategy - 3a) Sentence-Level Analysis: Conventions, Mechanics, Fluency - What to do?
Discuss spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar. Fluency: use of transitional phrases and punctuation Example: "funky" punctuation within the passage.
OR Strategy - 3a) Sentence-Level Analysis: Match Language Forms to Purpose/Perspective - What to do?
Discuss whether formal, informal, persuasive, descriptive, etc.
OR Strategy - 3b) Discourse-Level Analysis - What are the talking points?
Amount, Structure, Variety of Sentence Types, Density, Organization and Cohesion of Ideas (Examples: how many descriptive structures, comparative structures, activating background knowledge for comparisons, purpose of the passage)
OR Strategy - 3b) Discourse-Level Analysis: Density - What is it?
How deep and how much content/meaning, how clear are the ideas, textbook vs. literature (i.e. figurative language)
OR Strategy - 3b) Discourse-Level Analysis: Organization and Cohesion of Ideas - What are the talking points?
"What is the purpose of the structure?" Expository (i.e. embedded definitions), Narrative (i.e. background knowledge and voice), Analytical, Persuasive, Point of View, Compare/Contrast
OR Strategy - 4) Language Objectives - What are they?
Language objectives articulate HOW the student will demonstrate content mastery through academic language skills. Language function + content objective = language objective
OR Strategy - 4) Language Objectives - What are the 3 types we need to write?
Vocabulary and Discourse Objective (oral), Reading Comprehension Objective, Written Discourse Objective - Look for language already embedded in the tasks of the lesson.
OR Strategy - 4) Language Objectives - What are the 4 language skills?
Use the 4 language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing). 2x2 matrix - written/spoken vs. input/output. Listening (spoken input), Speaking (spoken output), reading (written input), writing (written output)
OR Strategy - 4) Language Objectives - What are some elements of language objectives?
Language functions: describe, explain, compare, justify, hypothesize. Identifying grammar or language structures:comparative language, passive voice. Identifying essential vocabulary: words in order to talk, read and write about a topic. Use language learning comprehension strategies: questioning, making predictions, using text.
OR Strategy - 4) Language Objectives - What are examples of Vocabulary/Discourse objectives?
Vocab: determine the meaning of unfamiliar words; utilize content-specific vocabulary to answer questions about the text. Discourse: orally summarize, orally retell, follow one/two/multi-step directions
OR Strategy - 4) Language Objectives - What are examples of Reading Comprehension objectives?
Determine the theme/main idea/conclusions of a text. Provide an accurate summary of the text. Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text Distinguish between fact, opinion, reasoned judgment and speculation in a text. Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author's point of view or purpose.
OR Strategy - 4) Language Objectives - What are examples of Written Discourse objectives?
Quote accurately/cite specific textual evidence when explaining what the text says explicity, drawing inferences, or supporting analysis of historic/technical texts. Summarize in writing.
OR Lesson Plan w/Scaffolds - What are key points of the Lesson Plan?
1) Scaffold for students at different levels 2) model, model, model (picture, think aloud, etc.) 3) sensory, graphic and interactive supports (up until WIDA L5) 4) work in pairs or groups
OR Lesson Plan - What are the parts of the lesson plan?
Vocabulary, Reading, Writing, Assessment
OR Lesson Plan - Vocab Strategy: How to provide a rich & varied language experience?
Learn through reading, writing, listening, speaking • in early proficiency it is important to listen and speak
OR Lesson Plan - Vocab Strategy: What are strategies to teach individual words?
Give definition and context • actively process new meanings • multiple exposures to new words
OR Lesson Plan - Vocab Strategy: What are strategies to teach word learning?
Word parts • context and inference • dictionary • cognate knowledge
Cognate - definition and examples
Words that "sound the same" between languages or dialects. Examples: problem/problema, complicated/complicado
OR Lesson Plan - Vocab Strategy Example: 7-step process for pre-teaching vocabulary
1) Teacher says the word, student repeats. 2) Teacher states the word in context from the text. 3) Teacher provides the dictionary definition. 4) Teacher explains the meaning with a student-friendly definition. 5) Teacher highlights features of the word (polysemous, cognate, tense, prefix, etc.) 6) Teacher engages students in activities to develop word/concepts knowledge. 7) Teacher assigns peer reading with oral and written summarization activities. Teacher explains how new words will be used.
OR Lesson Plan - Vocab Strategy Example: Word Wheel - What is it and how to use it?
Strategy for approaching Tier 2 words. Put word in the center, students will add words around the central word that are related to or synonyms of the word.
OR Lesson Plan - Vocab Strategy Example: Lexical Array - What is it and how to use it?
Strategy for expanding vocabulary. Identify word that could be made more precise. Identify more sophisticated words that are synonymous. Example: hard/difficult/challenging/laborious, make/build/construct
OR Lesson Plan - Vocab Strategy Example: Word Form Chart - What is it and how to use it?
Strategy to display forms of vocabulary words that are frequently transformed. Ex: prohibit, prohibition, prohibitive, prohibitively
OR Lesson Plan - Reading Strategies - What are key points to remember about planning for reading strategies?
Model! • frequent checks for understanding • connect to background knowledge • consider modifications for volume, complexity and time as necessary
OR Lesson Plan - Reading Strategy Examples: What are strategies for PRE-READING?
1) Activate background knowledge (reference point, visuals) 2) identify challenging cocabulary
OR Lesson Plan - Reading Strategy Examples: What are strategies for DURING READING?
1) purpose for reading (annotation focus, chunking, graphic organizer) 2) interactive supports (pairs/groups, mentors)
OR Lesson Plan - Reading Strategy Examples: What are strategies for AFTER READING?
1) frequent comprehension checks (guiding Qs, teacher check-ins, strategy modeling), 2) ask differentiated Qs (reference purpose, require evidence, provide evidence, scaffolded Qs)
OR Lesson Plan - Writing Strategy Examples: What are strategies for Structuring & Scaffolding writing?
Graphic Organizers • Sentence Starters, Sentence Frames • Word bank • Exemplar/model • Extended time or shortened prompt • Alternate option for L1 or L2 (diagram, map, web, chart, matrix, graphic organizer, timeline, drawing)
OR Lesson Plan - Writing Strategy Examples: What are strategies for providing feedback for writing?
Teach spelling and grammar in context • Balance of accuracy with fluency and motivation