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LATIN 1 MIDTERM

STUDY
PLAY
ecce
look
puella
girl
nōmine
by name, called
quae
who
habitat
lives
etiam
also
vīlla
country house
vīlla rūstica
country house and farm
ubi
where
aestāte
in summer
laeta
happy
quod
because
iam
now
sub arbore
under the tree
sedet
sits
et
and
legit
reads
altera
a second
vīcīna
neighboring
dum
while
scrībit
writes
Quis...?
Who...?
Cūr
why
Quid facit...?
What does...do? What is...doing?
quoque
also
sunt
(they) are
amīcae
friends
hodiē
today
sed
but
in agrīs
in the fields
ambulant
they walk
brevī tempore
in a short time, soon
dēfessa
tired
nōn iam
no longer
strēnua
active, energetic
currit
runs
tandem
at last
ex agrīs
from/out of the fields
ad vīllam rūsticam
to/toward the country house and farm
lentē
slowly
Quid faciunt...?
What are...doing?
puer
boy
quī
who
eādem
the same
in hōrto
in the garden
clāmant
shout
rīdent
they laugh
vir
man
servus
slave
multī
many
in vīllīs rūsticīs
in country houses
labōrant
they work
sōlus
alone
īrātus
angry
subitō
suddenly
in piscīnam
into the fishpond
cadit
falls
Abīte, molestī!
Go away, you pests!
gemit
groans
-ne
indicates a question
Minimē!
no
Ita vērō!
yes
molestus
troublesome, annoying
semper
always
vexat
annoys
igitur
therefore
amat
likes, loves
dormit
sleeps
cōnspicit
catches sight of
fūrtim
stealthily
appropinquat
approaches
ascendit
climbs
if
diēs
day
calidus
warm
in silvam
into the woods
ibi
there
rīvus
stream
frīgidus
cool, cold
errant
wander
prope
near
vult
wishes, wants
ignāvus
cowardly, lazy
respondet
replies
neque
neither, nor
temerārius
rash, reckless, bold
lupus
wolf
perterritus
frightened, terrified
statim
immediately
Ferte auxilium!
Bring Help! Help!
ubi
where, when
clāmor
shout, shouting
ad puellās
toward the girls
eōs
them
eum
him
petit
looks for, seeks
arripit
grabs hold of, snatches
repellit
drives off
ē silvā
out of the woods
salvae
safe
adveniunt
reach, arrive
quem
whom
nōndum
not yet
lūcet
it is light, it is day
surgit
gets up, rises
per vīllam
through the country house
pater
father
mater
mother
etiam
also, even
neque
and...not
tamen
however
ancilla
slave woman
omnēs
everyone
observat
watches
pūrgat
cleans
cibus
food
coquere
to cook
mox
soon, presently
strēnuē
strenuously, hard
aqua
water
portant
carry
reprehendit
blames,scolds
docet
teaches
cūrāre
to look after, take care of
lānam trahunt
spin wool
omnia quae
everything that
adiuvāre
to help
ipsa
she herself
nunc
now
necesse est
it is necessary
quī
who
suā
her own
nēmō
no one
nūllī
no
iānitor
doorkeeper
ad iānuam
at the door
tacitē
silently
temptat
he/she tries
sēmisomna
half-asleep
hīc
here
Tacē!
Be quiet!
nōlī___excitāre
don't wake___up
mēcum
with me
misera
unhappy, miserable
nōbīs
for us
discēdere
to go away
tuus
your (sing.)
vōs omnēs
all of y'all
simul
together
nesciō
i do not know
secundā hōrā
at the second hour
lacrimat
he/she weeps
ō mē miseram!
Poor me!
manēre
to remain, stay
Valē!
Goodbye!
mitte
send
prōmittis
you promise
complexū
in an embrace
tenet
he/she holds
lacrimāns
weeping
abit
he/she goes away
iam
now,already
Age!
come on (sing.)
Agite!
come on (plural)
vōs
you (plural)
nōs
we,us
excitāre
to rouse, wake (someone) up
intrat
he/she enters
cubiculum
bedroom
tempus
time
deinde
then, next
celeriter
quickly
induit
he/she puts on
iterum
again, a second time
mihi
for me
intereā
meanwhile
gerit
wears
iubet
he/she orders
alius
another, other
cista
trunk, chest
pōnere
to put, place
in itinere
on a journey
līberī
children
gerere solent
they are accustomed to wearing, usually wear
ipse
himself
stat
he/she stands
via
road
baculum
stick
habet
he/she has, holds
scelestus
wicked
crās
tomorrow
incitat
he/she spurs on, urges on
raeda
carriage
servus quīdam
a certain slave
iacit
he/she throws
parātus
ready
raedārius
coachman
equus
horse
eō ipsō tempore
at that very moment
nunc
now
festīnat
he/she hurries
Via Appia
The Appian Way
vīlicus
overseer, farm manager
dominus
master
absum, abesse
to be away, be absent
ārea
open space, threshing floor
plēnus
full
quamquam
although
mussō, mussāre
to mutter
verberō, verberāre
to beat
id quod
that which, what
īra
anger
illā nocte
that night
effugiō, effugere
to flee, run away, escape
impediō, impedīre
to hinder
sē cēlāre
to hide (himself)
porta
gate
inveniō, invenīre
to find
bonus
good
convocō, convocāre
to call together
rogō, rogāre
to ask
vīnea
vineyard
fossa
ditch
canis
dog
ferō, ferre
to bring, carry
olfaciō, olfacere
to catch the scent of, smell
cum
with
lātrō, lātrāre
to bark
vēstīgia
tracks, footprints, traces
immōbilis
motionless
tunicā
by the tunic
trahō, trahere
to drag
in fronte litterās inūrere
to brand the letters on his forehead
Zeus
weather, lightning bolt, eagle; Jupiter, Jove
Poseidon
sea, horses, trident; Neptune
Hades
underworld, dead people, jewels; Pluto
Hestia
hearth, home, fire; Vesta
Demeter
harvest, grain, things that grow; Ceres
Hera
marriage, childbirth, peacock; Juno
Athena
wisdom, strategic warfare, owl, Nike; Minerva
Hephaestus
forge, blacksmiths; Vulcan
Ares
war, vulture, Eris; Mars
Aphrodite
love, beauty, seashell, dolphin, dove; Venus
Hermes
messenger god, merchants, shepherds, travelers, thieves, caduceus; Mercury
Apollo
music, poetry, light, sports, lyre, golden arrows, sun
Artemis
the hunt, silver arrows, silver deer, moon; Diana
Dionysus
wine, revelry, satyr; Bacchus
Gaea
earth; marries Uranus
Uranus
sky; marries Gaea; Lord of the Universe
First round of Uranus and Gaea's kids
Titans; 6 boys, 6 girls; the pretty, wonderful children; Cronus was the youngest
Second round of Uranus and Gaea's kids
Cyclopes; 3 of them named Lightning, Thunder, and Thunder-Bolt; one-eyed blacksmiths; ugly; Uranus threw them into Tartarus
Third round of Uranus and Gaea's kids
Hecatonchires; 3 of them; 50 heads and 100 arms; ugly; Uranus threw them into Tartarus
Gaea's plan to overthrow Uranus
fashioned a sickle and told the Titans to take it and set their brothers free; only Cronus dared to take it; Uranus fled and Cronus became Lord of the Universe
Pontus
sea; Gaea's second husband
Cronus's rule
golden age of the universe
Why was Gaea upset with Cronus?
he didn't set his monstrous brothers free
Gaea's plan to get rid of Cronus
she knew Cronus's son would overthrow him; when Rhea gave birth to her sixth child, Rhea hid him and gave Cronus a rock wrapped in clothes to swallow instead
Zeus growing up
Rhea and Gaea hid Zeus in Crete; he was nursed by nymphs and a goat, Amaltheia; from his horns flowed ambrosia and nectar
Metis
goddess of prudence; gave Zeus advice on how to free his siblings; later she turns into a fly while pregnant and Zeus swallows her
How were Cronus's children regurgitated?
Metis tricked Cronus into eating an herb that made him vomit up his children
Cronus and Rhea's children
Hades, Poseidon, Hestia, Demeter, Hera, Zeus
Why were the Titans angry with Zeus and his siblings?
they were Zeus's aunts and uncles and thought they should be next in line to take over
Which Titans sided with Zeus?
Prometheus (had the gift of forethought and sided with the winner; Epametheus (gift of afterthought)
What did the Cyclopes and the Hecatonchires do for Zeus's side?
the Cyclopes made weapons and the Hecatonchires threw rocks at the Titans
What did Zeus and his siblings do with the Titans when they won?
Titans were locked up in Tartarus except for Atlas; he had to hold the sky on his shoulders
Why was Gaea upset with Zeus and what did she do?
the Titans were locked in Tartarus; she sends monsters to kill Zeus; he defeats them
Who is the Greek hero?
Odysseus
Who is the Roman hero?
Aeneas
Who are Aeneas' parents?
Venus and Anchises
Which war did Aeneas fight in?
the Trojan War
Who is the father of Paris?
King Priam
When did the Trojan War begin?
when helen ran away with paris
Who is Helen?
Queen of Sparta and wife of Menelaus; most beautiful woman in the world; runs off with Paris
Where does Paris bring Helen?
back to Troy
Who does Menelaus seek help from?
his brother, Agamemnon
What does Agamemnon do?
arranges a HUGE army and Sieges Troy
Who are the Greek heroes from the army?
Odysseus and Achilles
Who are the Trojan heroes from the army?
Hector and Aeneas
How long did the stalemate in the Trojan War last?
10 years
How were the Greeks finally able to take over Troy?
Odyseus created a deception.
What actions did Odysseus carry out for his deception?
1. the Greeks constructed a huge wooden horse that was sent into the Trojan city; it contained Greek soldiers; 2. at night when the horse was within the city, they climbed out from the belly of the horse and attacked/burned down the city
What did the gods tell Aeneas?
to flee the city and found a new one of his his because the Trojans were going to lose
Who did Aeneas bring with him?
his wife (Creusa), dad (Anchises), and son (Ascanius) and 20 shiploads of companions
What happened to Creusa?
she was lost during the flight
What present day country does Aeneas finally settle in?
Italy
What does Aeneas name his land?
Lavinium
What was Aeneas's new land named after?
his second wife, Lavinia
What was the name of the Italians and the exiled Trojans that now inhabited Lavinium?
Latins
What is the name of the epic poem that tells of Aeneas' travel? Who was it written by?
The Aeneid by Vergil
What did Ascanius do after Aeneas died?
he left Lavinium and established a new city
What was the name of the city that Ascanius founded?
Alba Longa
Who was Ascanius' son?
Silvius
Who was a king of Alba Longa?
King Numitor
Who overthrew Numitor and sent his to prison?
Amulius, his brother
What did Amulius do to ensure that he did not have any successors.
he killed his nephews and then appointed his niece, Rhea, as a priestess
What was the point of Rhea being a priestess?
So that she would remain without relations with men and not have any kids.
Who vists Rhea?
Mars
What happens 9 months later after Mars' visit?
out pops Romulus and Remus
What does Amulius do with the babies?
sends them down the Tiber River
Who finds the babies?
a she-wolf
Who finds the babies the second time?
Faustulus
What does Faustulus do?
raises them
When Romulus and Remus find out who they are, what do they do?
they put their grandfather back on the throne
What happens when Rom and Rem want to have their own city?
they talk to the gods and the gods give them omens
What was Remus' omen?
6 vultures on Aventine Hill
What was Romulus' omen?
he saw 12 vultures second
When Romulus came out victor, how did Remus react?
he was jealous and was teasing Romulus
How did Romulus react to Remus?
he killed him and made it known to all to inform them that anyone who crossed the Roman walls would end up dead just like Remus
What day was Rome founded on?
April 21, 753 BC
bulla
amulet hung around a child's neck on the ninth day after their birth; supposed to protect the child from evil
Liberalia
festival where a boy became a man; boy would stop wearing the toga praetexta and wear the toga virilis; he would dedicate his bulla and the first scrapings of his beard to the household gods Lares and Penates
When would a girl stop wearing her bulla?
when she got married
What did regular Roman men wear?
knee-length tunica, toga pura/toga virilis
What did Roman government officials wear?
tunica w/ purple stripes; toga praetexta
toga candida
worn by men running for offices; a toga pura covered in chalk so that it sparkled in the sun
What did Roman women wear?
tunica, stola, palla, jewelry
What did Roman girls wear?
tunica, toga praetexta, bulla
What did Roman boys wear?
tunica w/ narrow purple stripes, toga praetexta, bulla
Romans' shoes
all wore soleae (shoes) or sandalia (sandals)
Where did slave auctions take place?
the Forum
magones
slave-dealer
What did white chalk on the feet of a slave indicate?
the slave was new and had never been a slave
Things slaves could not do
vote, wear citizens' clothing, use the legal system, marry legally, own property
What happened to runaway slaves?
they could be branded
Saturnalia
festival where the masters and the slaves would switch places for a day
How to become a slave
POW, verna (born into slavery), captured by pirates and sold, punishment for crime (abandoning army, heavy debt)
slave uprising
led by Sparticus; 6,000 slaves held off the Roman army for two years before the Romans won; every slave in the uprising was crucified
taberna
shop at the front of the house; people would sell things themselves or rent the space out to merchants
cubiculum/a
bedroom
triclinium
dining room; 3 couches; could seat 9
atrium
most important room in the house; where the Romans recieved guests
impluvium
floor in the atrium; collected water to use for drinking water
compluvium
opening in the ceiling of the atrium that let in light
tablinum
study/office; served as a dividing point between the two halves of the house
lararium
shrine; small altar in the atrium where citizens could worship privately; had statues of favorite gods and things to remember deceased relatives
latrina
restroom
culina
kitchen; outdoors in case of fire and because of smells
hortus
garden
peristylium
colonnade surrounding the garden (like a courtyard)
summer triclinium
romans ate there in summer when it was either too hot or too nice to eat inside
domus
house
SID SPACE
sine-without; in- in/on; dē- down from/ about; sub- under; pro- for; ā/ab- away from, by; cum- with; ē/ex- out of
accusative prepositions
ad-towards, at, to; ante-before; in-into; per-through; prope- near; post-after
1st declesnion nominative singular
a
1st declension nominative plural
ae
2nd declension (m) nominative sing.
us (er, r)
2nd declension (m) nominative pl.
ī
2nd dec.(neuter) nom. sing.
um
2nd declension (neuter) nom. pl.
a
3rd declension nominative pl.
ēs
1st declension genitive singular
ae
1st declension genitive plural
ārum
2nd declension genitive sing.
ī
2nd dec. gen. pl.
ōrum
3rd dec. gen. sing.
is
3rd dec. gen. pl.
um
1st declension accusative singular
am
1st declension accusative plural
ās
2nd dec. (m) acc. sing.
um
2nd dec. (m) acc. pl.
ōs
2nd dec. (neuter) acc. sing.
um
2nd dec (neuter) acc. pl.
a
3rd declension acc. sing.
em
3rd declension acc. pl.
ēs
1st declension ablative singular
ā
1st declension ablative plural
īs
2nd declension ablative sing.
ō
2nd declension ablative pl.
īs
3rd declension ablative sing.
e
3rd declension ablative pl.
ibus
vocative (us)
e
vocative (ius)
ī
iter
journey
iter faciēbant
were traveling
tribus diēbus
in three days
volēbat
wanted
identidem
again and again
iubēbat
kept ordering
virga
stick
verberābat
kept beating
ibant
were going
rusticus
peasant
septimus
seventh
erat
was
quiescēbant
were resting
pēs
foot
vehicula
vehicles
auriga
charioteer
magnō risū
with a loud laugh
fatuus
stupid
tabellarius
courier
civis
citizen
praeclarus
distinguished
ab
from
pars
part
Quam!
How!
ferociter
fiercely
Cavē!
Watch out for!
vitare
to avoid
concidere
to fall down
cuncti
all
incolumis
unhurt
gaudēre
to be glad
quod
that
cessare
to do nothing
extrahere
to drag out
frūstrā
in vain
haerēre
to stick
movēre
to move
culpa
fault
tuā culpā
because of your fault, it's your fault that
cisium
light two-wheeled carriage
interpellare
to interrupt
placidē
gently, peacefully
quod
which
celerrimē
very fast
noster
our
devertebat
he began to turn aside
periculum
danger
ars
skill
agere
to do
Tune...spectabas
Were you watching
commotus
moved
accidit
happens
praenomen (men)
like our first name; named for a male relative on the 9th day after birth
nomen (men)
like our last name; indicates clan
cognomen (men)
nickname; what they were called by
praenomen (women)
signified position in family; sometimes feminine form of father's name
cognomen (women)
same as father's cognomen
nomen (women)
same as mother's nomen
patria potestas
power of life and death fathers had over everyone living in his household
controls over potestas
Slaying of a child had to be first discussed in a council of adult male relatives; daughter had to consent to her marriage