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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Don Carlos Buell
  2. Millard Fillmore
  3. THE CIVIL WAR
  4. Perpetual Union
  5. Robert Gould Shaw
  1. a 13th president of the United States (1850-53), whose insistence on federal enforcement of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 alienated the North and led to the destruction of the Whig Party. Elected vice president in 1848, he became chief executive on the death of President Zachary Taylor (July 1850).
  2. b ...
  3. c Don Carlos Buell was a United States Army officer. Buell led Union armies in two great Civil War battles—Shiloh and Perryville. The nation was angry at his failure to defeat the outnumbered Confederates after Perryville, or to secure East Tennessee. Buell was relieved of field command in late 1862.
  4. d This concept established the United States of America as a national entity. Under American constitutional law, this concept means that states are not permitted to withdraw from the Union.
  5. e Union army officer who commanded a prominent regiment of African American troops during the American Civil War. His regiment's shining hour came on the evening of July 18, when it heroically assaulted Fort Wagner, an earthwork that defended Charleston. Nearly half of the regiment's troops were casualties—including Shaw, who was killed—but the attack had proved to the world the mettle of black soldiers.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. Politician who served as vice president of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. Stephens headed the Confederate commission to the abortive peace conference at Hampton Roads, Virginia, in February 1865. After the fall of the Confederacy (May 1865), Stephens was confined for five months at Fort Warren, Boston.
  2. Politician during the American Civil War (1861-65) whose Southern sympathies and determined vendetta against the Federal government and its war policy resulted in his court-martial and exile to the Confederacy. During the Civil War he bitterly attacked the administration of President Abraham Lincoln, charging that it was destroying not only the Constitution but civil liberty as well.
  3. It increased the income tax rates established by the Internal Revenue Act of 1862. In addition to this, the act established stamp taxes on such items as matches and photographs. This act was allowed to expire as the populace mainly viewed it as an emergency measure for war-time situations. The Act ultimately expired in 1873 in the face of increased deficit spending.
    -Lincoln administration
  4. The Battle of Monitor and Merrimack, was a naval battle of the American Civil War, famous for being the first fight between two ironclad warships, the USS Monitor and the CSS Virginia (the latter rebuilt from the burned-out hull of the USS Merrimack). The principal confrontations took place on March 8 and March 9, 1862, off Sewell's Point, a narrow place near the mouth of Hampton Roads, Virginia. The naval battle lasted two days. The battle, though inconclusive, received worldwide publicity. After the battle, it was clear that ironclad ships were the future of naval warfare.
    -Lincoln administration
  5. An act that provided grants of land to states to finance the establishment of colleges specializing in "agriculture and the mechanic arts."

5 True/False questions

  1. Ambrose BurnsideAn American army officer who played a critical role in the Civil War by defeating the Confederate Army at Gettysburg, Pa.

          

  2. Billy YanksU.S. Army officer and public official who was active in Democratic politics in the mid-19th century. He was defeated for the presidency in 1848.

          

  3. Martin Van BurenA war between the United States and Mexico (April 1846-February 1848) stemming from the United States' annexation of Texas in 1845. The war—in which U.S. forces were consistently victorious—resulted in the United States' acquisition of more than 500,000 square miles of Mexican territory extending westward from the Rio Grande to the Pacific Ocean.

          

  4. William S. RosecransAmerican southern political leader and "fire-eater" who, in his later years, consistently urged the South to secede in response to Northern antislavery agitation.

          

  5. Jeb StuartConfederate cavalry officer whose reports of enemy troop movements were of particular value to the Southern command during the American Civil War (1861-65).