NAME

Question types


Start with


Question limit

of 58 available terms

Advertisement Upgrade to remove ads
Print test

5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Salmon Chase
  2. Dred Scott case
  3. Martin Van Buren
  4. First confiscation act
  5. Don Carlos Buell
  1. a The opinion delivered on March 6, 1857, in Dred Scott v. Sanford is well known. In essence, the decision argued that Scott was a slave and as such was not a citizen and could not sue in a federal court. The Dred Scott decision probably created more disagreement than any other legal opinion in U.S. history; it became a violently divisive issue in national politics and dangerously undermined the prestige of the Supreme Court.
  2. b The first Confiscation Act, passed on Aug. 6, 1861, authorized Union seizure of rebel property, and it stated that all slaves who fought with or worked for the Confederate military services were freed of further obligations to their masters.
  3. c Salmon Chase was an American politician and jurist. Chase was one of the most prominent members of the new Republican Party. Chase articulated the "Slave Power conspiracy" thesis well before Lincoln. He coined the slogan of the Free Soil Party, "Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men." He devoted his energies to the destruction of what he considered the Slave Power.
  4. d 8th president of the United States (1837-41) and one of the founders of the Democratic Party. He was known as the "Little Magician" to his friends (and the "Sly Fox" to his enemies) in recognition of his reputed cunning and skill as a politician.
  5. e Don Carlos Buell was a United States Army officer. Buell led Union armies in two great Civil War battles—Shiloh and Perryville. The nation was angry at his failure to defeat the outnumbered Confederates after Perryville, or to secure East Tennessee. Buell was relieved of field command in late 1862.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. The second Confiscation Act, passed July 17, 1862, was virtually an emancipation proclamation. It said that slaves of civilian and military Confederate officials "shall be forever free," but it was enforceable only in areas of the South occupied by the Union Army.
  2. An American soldier, railroad executive, inventor, industrialist, and politician from Rhode Island, serving as governor and a U.S. Senator. As a Union Army general in the American Civil War, he conducted successful campaigns in North Carolina and East Tennessee but was defeated in the disastrous Battle of Fredericksburg and Battle of the Crater.
  3. Government girls were women who, during the Civil War, took government jobs that had previously been held by men but had been vacated as the men left to fight the war.
  4. American statesman, U.S. congressman and U.S. senator, who was a major promoter of the Compromise of 1850. Clay was twice an unsuccessful candidate for president, first running as a National Republican (1832) and then as a Whig (1844).
  5. Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson was a Confederate general during the American Civil War, and one of the best-known. Confederate pickets accidentally shot him at the Battle of Chancellorsville on May 2, 1863. His death was a severe setback for the Confederacy, affecting military prospects, the morale of its army and of the general public.

5 True/False questions

  1. Millard Fillmore13th president of the United States (1850-53), whose insistence on federal enforcement of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 alienated the North and led to the destruction of the Whig Party. Elected vice president in 1848, he became chief executive on the death of President Zachary Taylor (July 1850).

          

  2. John Clfford PembertonConfederate general during the Civil War, remembered for his unsuccessful defense of Vicksburg.

          

  3. Mexican War...

          

  4. Perpetual UnionThis concept established the United States of America as a national entity. Under American constitutional law, this concept means that states are not permitted to withdraw from the Union.

          

  5. Slave PowerSlave Power was a pejorative term used by opponents of slavery in the U.S. to identify the corrupting influence that slavery had on the United States of America. The Republican Party argued that the slave owners had seized control of most of the national government and were using it to their own ends. The American Civil War destroyed the "slave power" and the Republican policies during Reconstruction were specifically designed to totally erase its influence.