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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. Mood
  2. Prose
  3. Anecdote
  4. Deductive reasoning
  5. Tautology
  1. a A brief recounting of a relevant episode. Anecdotes are often inserted into fictional or non-fictional texts as a way of developing a point or injecting humor.
  2. b Any writing that is not poetry.
  3. c An atmosphere created by a writer's word choice (diction) and the details selected. Syntax is also a determiner of mood because sentence strength, length, and complexity affect pacing.
  4. d reasoning in which a conclusion is reached by stating a general principle and then applying that principle to a specific case
  5. e needless repetition of an idea by using different but equivalent words; a redundancy

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. The central idea or ideas of a work of fiction or nonfiction, revealed and developed in the course of a story or explored through argument.
  2. the deliberate use of many conjunctions for special emphasis - to highlight quantity or mass of detail or to create a flowing continuous sentence pattern. It slows the pace of the sentence.
  3. a statement that does not follow logically from evidence
  4. Reasoning that ends and begins in the same place. No evidence is offered
  5. The appearance of truth, actuality, or reality; what seems to be true in fiction.

5 True/False questions

  1. Epiphetadj or other descriptive phrase regularly used to characterize a person, place, or thing

          

  2. Resolutiona turn of fate that leaves the tragic figure destitute

          

  3. StyleA writer's attitude toward his or her subject matter revealed through diction, figurative language, and organization of the sentence and global levels.

          

  4. Inversionconstructing a sentence so the predicate comes before the subject. This creates an emphatic or rhythmic effect.

          

  5. IdiomAn atmosphere created by a writer's word choice (diction) and the details selected. Syntax is also a determiner of mood because sentence strength, length, and complexity affect pacing.