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125 terms

10th Grade English (Semester 2) - EVERYTHING

STUDY
PLAY
stagnant
(adj.): something that lies inactive or stays in one place
succinct
(adj.): concise; clearly expressed with a few words
surmise
(v.): to infer on minimal grounds; conjecture; suppose
tedious
(adj.): boring; tiresome
terse
(adj.): concise; brief; free of extra words
tirade
(n.): a long and angry speech
undermine
(v.): to weaken the support of; to injure in a slow or sneaky way
verbose
(adj.): wordy
viable
(adj.): workable; capable of living and growing; able to succeed
vilify
(v.): to defame; to slander; to blacken the character of
vivacious
(adj.): lively; spirited
wanton
(adj.): immoral; lewd; deliberate maliciousness; having no regard for others
waver
(v.): to be indecisive or inconstant; to fluctuate in opinion
zealot
(n.): a person with great enthusiasm for and committed to a cause
zenith
(n.): the highest point
pious
(adj.): reverent; devout; dutiful
plausible
(adj.): believable
precept
(n.): a rule or principle to guide conduct
pretentious
(adj.): showy; self-important
prudent
(adj.): careful; cautious
quaint
(adj.): pleasantly old-fashioned
raucous
(adj.): boisterous; harsh sounding; noisy and disorderly
relic
(n.): an object associated with a saint; something that remains from the past
reprehensible
(adj.): deserving of blame
reprove
(v.): to gently criticize
resilient
(adj.): an ability to recover or adjust easily
respite
(n.): an interval of rest; a temporary delay
resplendent
(adj.): brilliant; gloriously bright
servile
(adj.): submissive; behaving like a slave
impassioned
(adj.): emotionally moving; filled with passion; ardent; fervent
adulation
(n.): praise; flattery
affront
(n.): an open, intentional insult; a slight to one's dignity
audacious
(adj.): bold; daring
benevolent
(adj.): inclined to do good; kindly
compunction
(n.): a feeling of slight regret for something done
demeanor
(n.): outward behavior; conduct
despondent
(adj.): discouraged or hopeless
esoteric
(adj.): beyond the understanding of most people; only known by a certain group
ignominious
(adj.): shameful; dishonorable
illiterate
(adj.): not knowing how to read or write
imprudence
(n.): an action taken without judgement or caution; rashness; indiscretion
patronize
(v.): to treat in a condescending manner
segregated
(adj.): separated into racial groups
trepidation
(n.): fearful uncertainty
viscous
(adj.): having a sticky, fluid consistency
attaché
(n.): military officer assigned to an embassy
balk
(v.): to hesitate at doing something
chivalrous
(adj.): courteous or generous toward women
commotion
(n.): disturbance
disarrayed
(adj.): thrown into disorder
discrepancy
(n.): contradiction
ebullient
(adj.): overflowing with excitement
elusive
(adj.): unable to be caught
incongruous
(adj.): out of place
largess
(adj.): generous
linguistics
(n.): the study of languages
myriads
(adj.): in large number
retribution
(n.): punishment
tempestuous
(adj.): resembling a severe storm
unperceived
(adj.): unnoticed
affable
(adj.): friendly or pleasant
cower
(v.): to shrink or hide oneself in fear
dank
(adj.): miserably damp and chilly
deplorable
(adj.): regrettable or terrible
dire
(adj.): dreadful
emanate
(v.): to come from or flow forth
exuberant
(adj.): lively
fervid
(adj.): full of emotion
grotesque
(adj.): not pleasing to the eye
incorruptible
(adj.): not subject to becoming dishonest
impartial
(adj.): showing no favoritism
indolent
(adj.): lazy
palpable
(adj.): capable of being touched
sallow
(adj.): sickly; yellow color
zealous
(adj.): enthusiastically devoted to a certain interest
absolve
(v.): to forgive or free from blame
advocate
(v.): to support or be in favor of (i.e., an action, not a person)
aesthetic
(adj.): concerned with or appreciative of beauty
altruistic
(adj.): concerned for the welfare of others
animosity
(n.): ill will; active dislike
arduous
(adj.): difficult to do; laborious
augment
(v.): to increase or enlarge
austere
(adj.): stern in manner or appearance
aversion
(n.): strong or fixed dislike; a feeling of
repugnance
cache
(n.): a hiding place; something hidden in a
secret place
callous
(adj.): unfeeling and insensitive
censure
(n.): the act of blaming or condemning
chastise
(v.): to punish for the sake of discipline
circumspect
(adj.): careful; thought through
coalesce
(v.): to come together as one; to fuse or
unite
aside
a line spoken by an actor to the audience but not intended for others on the stage
soliloquy
a (usually long) dramatic speech intended to give the illusion of unspoken reflections
iambic pentameter:
a poetic meter that is made up of 5 stressed syllables each followed by an unstressed syllable
blank verse
unrhymed verse written in iambic pentameter
pun
a play on words based on different meanings of words that sound alike
tragicomedy
drama which builds toward a tragic ending but resolves happily
romantic comedy
drama that focuses on love
archetype
A detail, image, or character type that occurs frequently in literature and myth and is thought to appeal in a universal way to the unconscious and to evoke a response
origin myth
A story that explains how something came to exist
aesthetic myth
a myth that is meant to entertain
autobiography
story of a person's life written by that person; can be comprehensive or narrow in focus
biography
an account of the series of events making up a person's life
essay
a short literary composition on a particular theme or subject
true life adventure
true tales of heroic deeds.
subjective writing
influenced by personal feelings; occurring or taking place within the mind
objective writing
writing that presents facts without revealing the writer's feelings and opinions
fiction
a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact
short story
a shorter work of fiction generally read in one sitting
novel
an extended fictional work focusing on several ideas
characterization
the act of describing distinctive characteristics or essential features
conflict
a struggle between opposing forces
foreshadowing
hints or clues of dangers that lie ahead in the piece of fiction.
irony
incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs
verbal irony
occurs when what is said contradicts what is meant or thought; sarcasm
dramatic irony
when a reader is aware of something that a character isn't
situational irony
occurs when the outcome of a work is unexpected, or events turn out to be the opposite from what one had expected
figurative language
communicates ideas beyond the ordinary, literal meaning of words
simile
compares unrelated nouns, usually using the words "like" or "as"
metaphor
an implied comparison that does not use the words like or as
personification
giving human characteristics to inanimate objects, ideas, or animals
hyperbole
an exaggeration for the sake of emphasis, not to be taken literally
alliteration
repetition of the initial letter or sound in two or more words in a line of verse
onomatopoeia
a word that represents or imitates natural sounds
assonance
the similarity or repetition of a vowel sound in two or more words
consonance
the repetition of final consonant sounds within a line of verse