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5 Written questions

5 Matching questions

  1. anadiplosis
  2. Loose sentence
  3. Logos
  4. Irony
  5. Understatement
  1. a Words used to express something other than and often the opposite of the literal meaning. Verbal-contrast between what is said and what is meant. Situational-contrast between what happens and what was expected. Dramatic-contrast between what the character thinks and what the reader knows.
  2. b Creates an exaggeration by showing restraint. The opposite of a hyperbole
  3. c the last word of the clause begins the next clause. Ex "The Furies pursued the men. The men.."
  4. d An independent clause followed by all sorts of debris. "She wore yellow ribbon that matched the shingles of the house, which were painted last year, just before he left for the war."
  5. e An appeal to reason, logic of an argument.

5 Multiple choice questions

  1. Adjective that follows a linking verb and modifies the subject of the sentence "the gigantic whirlpool was INKY black"
  2. One word is mistakenly substituted for another that sounds similar. "He is the very pineapple of politeness"
  3. Observation or claim that is opposition of author's original claim. If we argue for drilling of wells, the antithesis is diverting water from river.
  4. Fallacy of argumentation argues that one thing inevitably leads to another. Politicians use it a lot
  5. Failure of logical reasoning.

5 True/False questions

  1. Ellipsisthree dots indicating words have been left out. The engine revved...

          

  2. Non Sequitur"it does not follow" Argument by misdirection and is logically irrelevant

          

  3. GerundWords used to express something other than and often the opposite of the literal meaning. Verbal-contrast between what is said and what is meant. Situational-contrast between what happens and what was expected. Dramatic-contrast between what the character thinks and what the reader knows.

          

  4. ConnotationOmission of conjunctions from a series of related clauses. "All the orcs ate food, broke the dishes, trashed the hall, beat the dogs to the shower."

          

  5. EpistropheDirect address to someone not present. Nearly always pathos. "O eloquent, just, and mighty Death!"