19 terms

Kaplan GED - RLA - Writing Effective Sentences - Lesson 1-6

STUDY
PLAY

Terms in this set (...)

action verb
a verb that expresses physical or mental action (e.g. She 'kicked' the ball)
linking verb
a verb that links the subject of the sentence to additional information and doesn't express action (e.g. He 'likes' cake)
statement
a type of sentence - for example "Elaine has lost several files this way"
command
a type of sentence - for example "Turn off the computer"
question
a type of sentence - for example "Will the computer ever be fixed?"
exclaimation
a type of sentence - for example "What a mess we're in!"
compound sentence
a sentence with two independent clauses joined by a coordinating conjunction
dependent clause
a group of words with a subject and a verb that doesn't express a complete thought and, thus, can't stand alone as a complete sentence.
independent clause
a group of words with a subject and a verb that can stand alone as a complete sentence.
coordinating conjunction
words that combine two independant clauses - and, but, for, nor, or, so, and yet
run-on sentence
an incorrectly written sentence in which two or more independent clauses are not joined with the appropriate punctuation or conjunction, causing the meaning to be confusing to the reader.
comma splice
this occurs when two complete sentences are incorrectly joined by a comma (e.g. There are fewer bank tellers today, banks do not offer other services.)
predicate
all information related to the subject, except for the subject
subordination
the writing process of combining two sentences into a single, complex sentence (e.g. Carla ran for the bus. She missed it. => Although Carla ran for the bus, she missed it.)
modifiers
words and phrases used to add descriptive details such as adjectives and adjective clauses, or adverbs and adverbial clauses.
misplaced modifier
a modifier that is poorly placed in a sentence so that it is unclear what word it is related
dangling modifier
a modifier at the beginning of a sentence that has no clear connection to a subject
parallel structure
sentence structure where a sentence with multiple phrases or clauses in a list uses the same grammatical form for each (e.g. We walked, swam, and biked, all in the same day)
unparallel structure
sentence structure where a sentence with multiple phrases or clauses in a list doesn't use the same grammatical form for each (e.g. Jim went to the store, bought an exercise mat, and is doing exercises.)