How can we help?

You can also find more resources in our Help Center.

12 terms

Conifers description

STUDY
PLAY
Fir
evergreen, pyramidal with whorled branching pattern
Leaves flat and blunt or divided at tips
Female cones are born upright
Cedar
needles are curved toward the tip and appear in tufted clusters
fruit is cylindrical cone
Falsecypress
some native to western North America where they live 1000+ years, grows best in cooler, moist climates but often adaptable to Midwest
Branches usually flattened, frond -like: leaves opposite, scale-like
Maidenhair tree
True gymnosperm
deciduous, leaves fan shaped
Dioecious
Juniper
varied habits
dioecious, cones used to flavor gin
resin can restrict plant growth
Dawn redwood
single species to have originated 50 million years ago
Twigs, needles and cone scales appear in opposite pairs
deciduous with linear, feathery, fern-like foliage
Spruce
stiff needles that point in all directions
cones pendant at maturity
p. pungens, noted for blue color
a dwarf cultivar with showy red berries
Pine
needles in bundles of 2, 3 or 5
cone scales in some species with recurved prickle
some of the world's most important timber species
Bald cypress
decidious
knees
alternate leaf bud arrangement, distinguishes it from the metasequoia
Monoecious
Yew
most have flat green needles
dioecious, female produce single-seeded, fleshy, red aril
great for the shade
Aborvitae
erect seed cones, not showy
susceptible to snow damage
twigs densely covered with tiny, scale-like aromatic leaves in flat, fan-like sprays
Hemlock
bark cinnamon colored and furrowed
leaves are short and blunt with different sizes on same branch, 2 whitish bands of stomata underneath
will not thrive under hot, extremely dry conditions
unrelated to poisonous, herbaceous hemlocks that are members of the parsley family