1,997 terms

Vocab

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Abducted
kidnapped
(Distance or time) off
At a certain distance in space or time
(number) Out Of (number)
...
(Quantity) off
(quantity) less
(Something) is off
canceled
(Something) off
Not on, attached, or connected: with my shoes off.
Abhorrent
inspiring disgust and loathing; repugnant.
Ability
the power or skill to do something
About to (do something)
Indicates something that will happen very soon; indicates that something is imminent
Abruptly
sudden and unexpected
Absorb
to soak up or take in
Abstract
(adj) existing in thought or as an idea but not having a physical or concrete existence.
Absurd
ridiculous because of being irrational, incongruous, or illogical
Abuse
The intentional mistreatment or harm of another person
Acceptable
good enough; allowed or approved
x=unacceptable
Access
to make contact with or gain access to
Acclaim
Announce with great approval
Accidentally
unintentionally
Accommodate
1. to do a kindness or a favor to; oblige.
2. to provide with a room or other accommodations.
3. to have or make room for: This elevator accommodates 10 people.
4. to adjust or make suitable; adapt: to accommodate oneself to circumstances."
Accommodation
1. a room, group of rooms, or building in which someone may live or stay. "the cost includes airfare and hotel accommodations"
2. a convenient arrangement; a settlement or compromise. "management was seeking an accommodation with labor"
Accomplish
achieve or complete successfully.
According to
as stated by or in, n proportion or relation to.
Account (v)
consider or regard in a specified way.
"her visit could not be accounted a success"
Accountability
the fact or condition of being accountable; responsibility.
Accumulate
to increase in number or amount; to pile up, collect, or gather
Accurate
gradually gather or acquire (a resulting whole).
"her goal was to accumulate a huge fortune"
Accuse
charge (someone) with an offense or crime.
Achieve
To perform or carry out with success; accomplish.
Acknowledge
recognize; admit
Acquainted (with)
familiar with something; able to understand or recognize something. (*Typically: be ~; become ~; get ~.) Tom is fully acquainted with the way we do things.
Acquire
buy or obtain (an object or asset) for oneself.
Acquisition
an act of purchase of one company by another.
Across
From one side to the other of (something)
Act
see: behave
Actual
real
Actually
...
Adapt
...
Add
...
Addict
A physiological or psychological dependence on a drug
Addictive
Capable of causing a user to develop intense cravings
Address (v)
1. write the name and address of the intended recipient on (an envelope, letter, or package). "I addressed my letter to him personally"
2. think about and begin to deal with (an issue or problem). "a fundamental problem has still to be addressed"
Adequate
sufficient
Adherent
someone who supports a particular party, person, or set of ideas.
Admission
the act or process of admitting. a statement acknowledging the truth of something.
Admit
to acknowledge that something is true
Admittedly
by general admission; confessedly
Adopt
...
Adorable
charming, lovable, and usually very attractive
Adult
...
Advantage
A relatively favorable position; superiority of means: A better education gave us the advantage.
Adverse
in an opposing direction; contrary to your interests or welfare
Advocate
To speak, plead, or argue in favor of
Affiliate
officially attach or connect (a subsidiary group or a person) to an organization. "the college is affiliated with the University of Wisconsin"
Affiliation
...
Affirm
1- state as a fact; assert strongly and publicly.
2- offer (someone) emotional support or encouragement.
Affirmation
1- the action or process of affirming something or being affirmed.
2- emotional support or encouragement.
Afterlife
a form of existence believed to continue after death
Aftermath
A consequence, especially of a disaster or misfortune
Agonizing
causing great physical or mental pain.
Agreement
Ahead
further forward in space; in the line of one's forward motion.
Aim
(v)1-point or direct (a weapon or camera) at a target.
"aim the camcorder at some suitable object"
2-have the intention of achieving.
"new French cooking aims at producing clear, fresh flavors and light textures"
Albeit
even though
Alert
(adj) quick to notice any unusual and potentially dangerous or difficult circumstances; vigilant.
(n)1.the state of being watchful for possible danger.
2.an announcement or signal warning of danger.
(v)warn (someone) of a danger, threat, or problem, typically with the intention of having it avoided or dealt with."he alerted people to the dangers of smoking"
Alertness
State of consciousness in which one is aware, able to think, and able to respond to the environment; nearly synonymous with arousal.
Alienated
separated, socially disoriented. make (someone) feel isolated or estranged.
Allegation
a statement that is unproven and needs to be proven
Alleged
Said, without proof, to have taken place or to have a specified illegal or undesirable quality.
Allegedly
used to convey that something is claimed to be the case or have taken place, although there is no proof.
Allergic
...
Allergy
...
Alleviate
make (suffering, deficiency, or a problem) less severe
Alongside
By the side of; side by side with.
Alter
change or cause to change in character or composition, typically in a comparatively small but significant way.
"Eliot was persuaded to alter the passage"
Alternative
...
Amalgam
a mixture or blend.
"a curious amalgam of the traditional and the modern"
Amateur
engaging or engaged in without payment; nonprofessional.
Ambiguous
open to more than one interpretation; not having one obvious meaning.
Ambitious
having a strong desire for success or achievement
Amenity
a desirable or useful feature or facility of a building or place.
Analogy
A comparison based on such similarity
Analysis
...
Annihilate
destroy utterly; obliterate
Annihilation
the complete destruction of something
Announce
to make known publicly; proclaim
Annoy
...
Annoying
...
Annual
Occurring every year
Antagonise
cause (someone) to become hostile; "Don't antagonize your boss"
Anticipate
Guess or be aware of (what will happen) and take action in order to be prepared
Antics
foolish, outrageous, or amusing behavior.
"the antics of our political parties"
"someday you'll be too old to get away with such antics"
Apathy
Lack of emotion or feeling; impassiveness, indifference
Apparatus
a piece of machinery, a tool, or a device used for a specific purpose
Apparent
clearly visible or understood; obvious.
Apparently
it appears that; as far as one knows; seemingly, obviously
Appeal
(n): the quality of being attractive or interesting.
a serious or urgent request, typically one made to the public.
(v): be attractive or interesting.
make a serious or urgent request, typically to the public.
MED - Appendicitis
a serious medical condition in which the appendix becomes inflamed and painful.
Applaud
Show approval or praise by clapping: "the crowd whistled and applauded"; "his speech was loudly applauded".
Apply
...
Appraisal
an act of assessing something or someone.
Appraise
1. assess the value or quality of.
"she stealthily appraised him in a pocket mirror"
2. (of an official or expert) set a price on; value.
"they appraised the painting at $200,000"
Appreciate
recognize the full worth of.
Apprehension
anxiety or fear that something bad or unpleasant will happen.
Apprentice
one who is learning a trade or occupation, especially as a member of a labor union
Approach
The method used in dealing with or accomplishing
Appropriate
suitable or proper in the circumstances.
Arbitrary
based on random choice or personal whim, rather than any reason or system.
Archery
the sport of shooting arrows with a bow
Argue
give reasons or cite evidence in support of an idea, action, or theory, typically with the aim of persuading others to share one's view.
Arid
(of land or a climate) having little or no rain; too dry or barren to support vegetation.
Arouse
evoke or awaken (a feeling, emotion, or response).
Arrange (something) in order of
...
Arrangement
1. the action, process, or result of arranging or being arranged. "the arrangement of the furniture in the room"
2. plans or preparations for a future event.
"all the arrangements for the wedding were made"
Arrest
Arrow
Article
...
Articulate
(v) able to speak clearly and expressively. "they were unable to articulate their emotions"
(adj) (of a person or a person's words) having or showing the ability to speak fluently and coherently.
"an articulate account of their experiences"
As Far As
to the degree that
As well
also, in addition to
Ask Out
ask someone to be your boyfriend or girlfriend
Aspects
A particular part or feature of something: "the financial aspect can be overstressed".
Assault
Make a physical attack on
Assert
State a fact or belief confidently and forcefully
Assertive
having or showing a confident and forceful personality.
Assess
evaluate or estimate the nature, ability, or quality of.
Assessment
the evaluation or estimation of the nature, quality, or ability of someone or something.
Assets
A valuable item that is owned
Assign
...
Assimilate
Take in (information, ideas, or culture) and understand fully: "assimilate the week's events"
Associated (with)
...
Association
a connection or cooperative link between people or organizations.
Assume
...
Asthma
...
Astonishing
extremely surprising or impressive; amazing.
"an astonishing achievement"
At all
...
At this point
...
Attach
...
Attain
To gain as an objective; achieve: attain a diploma by hard work.
Attempt
...
Attend
be present at (an event, meeting, or function).
Attendant
1. a person employed to provide a service to the public in a particular place. "a flight attendant"
2. a person who is present at an event, meeting, or function. "he had become a regular attendant at chapel"
Attention
...
Attract
direct toward itself or oneself by means of some psychological power or physical attributes. cause to come to a place or participate in a venture by offering something of interest, favorable conditions, or opportunities.
Attribute
A quality or characteristic inherent in or ascribed to someone or something
Attribute (v)
regard something as being caused by (someone or something).
"he attributed the firm's success to the efforts of the managing director"
Audience
...
Audit
...
Authenticity
the genuineness or truth of something
Authorize
To grant authority or power to.
Available
...
Avalanche
A fall or slide of a large mass, as of snow or rock, down a mountainside.
Average
...
Avoid
To stay clear of
Awake
not asleep.
Aware
(sometimes followed by `of') having or showing knowledge or understanding or realization or perception
Awareness
having knowledge of
Awesome
...
Awful
...
Awfully
...
Awkward
lacking grace or ease
Bait
Food used to entice fish or other animals as prey
Ban
officially or legally prohibit.
Bare
Lacking the usual or appropriate covering or clothing; naked
Barely
By a very little; hardly
Bargain
(n): 1-an agreement between two or more parties as to what each party will do for the other.
2- a thing bought or offered for sale more cheaply than is usual or expected.
(v): negotiate the terms and conditions of a transaction.
Based on
...
Basis
1. the underlying support or foundation for an idea, argument, or process."trust is the only basis for a good working relationship"
2. the system or principles according to which an activity or process is carried on. "she needed coaching on a regular basis"
3.the justification for or reasoning behind something. "on the basis of these statistics, important decisions are made"
Be sold out
to have no more available to be bough
Bearable
endurable; tolerable
x= unbearable
Beat
to strike violently or forcefully and repeatedly.
Become
begin to be
Beg
1.to ask for as a gift, as charity, or as a favor:
"to beg alms; to beg forgiveness."
2.to ask (someone) to give or do something; implore:
"He begged me for mercy. Sit down, I beg you."
Behave
1. to act in a particular way; conduct or comport oneself or itself: The ship behaves well.
2. to act properly:
Did the child behave?
3. to act or react under given circumstances:
This plastic behaves strangely under extreme heat or cold.
Belch
to let gas from the stomach out through the mouth
Belong
1- fit in a specified place or environment.
2- be the property of.
Belonging
1- A personal item that one owns; a possession. Often used in the plural.
2- Acceptance as a natural member or part: a sense of belonging.
Bend
to force (an object, especially a long or thin one) from a straight form into a curved or angular one, or from a curved or angular form into some different form:
to bend an iron rod into a hoop.
Benefit (v)
to do good to; be of service to:
a health program to benefit everyone.
Beside
...
Betray
To give aid or information to an enemy of; commit treason against, unintentionally reveal; be evidence of.
Beyond
behind
Bias
1. a particular tendency, trend, inclination, feeling, or opinion, especially one that is preconceived or unreasoned: illegal bias against older job applicants; the magazine's bias toward art rather than photography; our strong bias in favor of the idea.
2. unreasonably hostile feelings or opinions about a social group; prejudice: accusations of racial bias.
Biased
Show prejudice for or against (someone or something) unfairly: "the tests were biased against women"
Bigoted
having or revealing an obstinate belief in the superiority of one's own opinions and a prejudiced intolerance of the opinions of others.
Bigotry
Intolerance toward those who hold different opinions from oneself.
"the difficulties of combating prejudice and bigotry"
Bite
(v) 1. (of a person or animal) use the teeth to cut into something in order to eat it.
(n) 1. an act of biting into something in order to eat it. "Stephen ate a hot dog in three big bites"
Bizzare
Strikingly unconventional and far-fetched in style or appearance; odd
Blackout
1- a failure of electrical power supply.
2- a suppression of information, esp. one imposed on the media by government.
3- a temporary loss of consciousness.
Blame
to attribute responsibility to; accuse
Blank
: without any writing, marks, or pictures.
: having empty spaces to be filled in with information : not yet written in or filled out.
: without any recorded sound or information.
Blessing
1. God's favor and protection. "may God continue to give us his blessing"
2. a prayer asking for God's favor and protection. "a priest gave a blessing as the ship was launched"
Blow
(v) 1. a of air (a) : to be in motion <a breeze blew gently> (b) : to move with speed or force <the wind was blowing>
2. to send forth a current of air or other gas <don't blow on your soup>
(n) 1. a strong wind. "we're in for a blow"
Boost
to increase the force, power, or amount of (something)
Bore (somebody) to death
to make someone lose interest completely
Borrow
To receive for temporary use
Bother
disturb
Bound to do something
certain to do something; destined to do something. "Jill's bound to do a good job." "We are bound to tell the truth."
Bow
(n) 1. a knot tied with two loops and two loose ends, used especially for tying shoelaces and decorative ribbons. "a girl with long hair tied back in a bow"
2. a weapon for shooting arrows, typically made of a curved piece of wood whose ends are joined by a taut string. "an archer's bow"
Brainstorming
Produce an idea or way of solving a problem by holding a spontaneous group discussion
Break Up
end a romantic relationship
Breath
...
Breathtaking
astonishing or awe-inspiring in quality, so as to take one's breath away.
Bred
(of a person or animal) reared in a specified environment or way. "a city-bred man"
-past and participle of breed.
Breed
(v) cause (an animal) to produce offspring, typically in a controlled and organized way. "he wants to see the animals his new stock has been bred from"
(n) a stock of animals or plants within a species having a distinctive appearance and typically having been developed by deliberate selection.
Breeze
the slight and refreshing wind
Briefly
for a short time, in a few words
Bright
: producing a lot of light : filled with light
: having a very light and strong color
: able to learn things quickly
Brilliant
: very bright : flashing with light
: very impressive or successful
: extremely intelligent : much more intelligent than most people
Bring
come to a place with (someone or something).
Broad
Wide in extent from side to side
Bruise
A bruise is an area of skin discoloration. A bruise occurs when small blood vessels break and leak their contents into the soft tissue beneath the skin.
Brush
(n)1. an implement with a handle, consisting of bristles, hair, or wire set into a block, used for cleaning or scrubbing, applying a liquid or powder to a surface, arranging the hair, or other purposes. "a paint brush"
(v) 1. remove (dust or dirt) by sweeping or scrubbing. "we'll be able to brush the mud off easily"
-clean (one's teeth) by scrubbing with a brush.
-arrange (one's hair) by running a brush through it.
Build
: to make (something) by putting together parts or materials
: to develop or form (something) gradually
: to increase the amount of (something)
Bunch
(n) a number of things, typically of the same kind, growing or fastened together.
"a bunch of grapes"
(v) collect or fasten into a compact group.
"she bunched the carnations together"
Burden
(n) 1. that which is carried; load: "a horse's burden of rider and pack."
2. that which is borne with difficulty; obligation; onus: "the burden of leadership."
(v) 1. to load heavily.
2. to load oppressively; trouble.
Burgle
to commit burglary upon (a house, etc.)
Burst into tears
start crying
Business
...
Bust - Busted
(v) 1. break, split, or burst (something). "they bust the tunnel wide open"
2. arrest. "he was busted for drugs"
Burst
(v) 1. (of a container) break suddenly and violently apart, spilling the contents, typically as a result of an impact or internal pressure. "we inflated dozens of balloons and only one burst"
(n) 1. (Military). the explosion of a projectile, especially in a specified place: "an air burst."
-a rapid sequence of shots fired by one pull on the trigger of an automatic weapon: "A burst from the machine gun shattered all the windows."
Buy
...
Buy Out
to purchase full ownership of something from someone or a group
By far
1) by a great deal; very much: "too expensive by far."
2) plainly; obviously: "This melon is by far the ripest of the lot."
By then
By that time.
By the time that.
Call off
cancel: postpone indefinitely or annul something that was scheduled
it's your call
it's your decision
Call in sick
to call one's place of work to say that one is ill and cannot come to work
Calm
...
Cancel
decide or announce that (an arranged or planned event) will not take place.
Canned
preserved in a can or jar: "canned peaches."
Capable (of)
Having the ability required for a specific task or accomplishment; qualified
Captivate
1. to attract and hold the attention or interest of, as by beauty or excellence; enchant: "Her blue eyes and red hair captivated him."
2. Obsolete. to capture; subjugate.
Care
...
Case
...
Casualty
...
Catastrophe
1. a sudden and widespread disaster: "the catastrophe of war."
2. any misfortune, mishap, or failure; fiasco: "The play was so poor our whole evening was a catastrophe."
Catastrophic
of the nature of a catastrophe, or disastrous event; calamitous: "a catastrophic failure of the dam."
Catch
1- intercept and hold (something that has been thrown, propelled, or dropped).
2- capture (a person or animal that tries or would try to escape).
Category
a division within a system of classification
Cater to
1. provide with food and drink in a professional capacity. "my mother helped to cater for the party"
"we cater for vegetarians"
2. provide with what is needed or required. "the school caters to children with learning difficulties"
-try to satisfy (a particular need or demand). "he catered to her every whim"
Cause
...
Ceasefire agreement
an agreement between all the main actors in a conflict that terminates military operations
Censorship
the practice of officially examining books, movies, etc., and suppressing unacceptable parts.
Certain
known for sure; established beyond doubt.
Characteristic
a feature or quality belonging typically to a person, place, or thing and serving to identify it.
Charge
(v) 1. to impose or ask as a price or fee: "That store charges $25 for leather gloves." "He didn't charge me for it."
2. to attack by rushing violently against: "The cavalry charged the enemy."
3. to accuse formally or explicitly (usually followed by with): "They charged him with theft."
(n) 1. expense or cost: "improvements made at a tenant's own charge."
2. a duty or responsibility laid upon or entrusted to one.
Chase
...
Check
...
Cheek
The fleshy part of either side of the face below the eye and between the nose and ear
Cheesy
(Slang) inferior or cheap; chintzy: "The movie's special effects are cheesy and unconvincing."
Cherish
(v)1. to hold or treat as dear; feel love for: to cherish one's native land.
2. to care for tenderly; nurture: to cherish a child.
3. to remember or hold (an idea, belief, etc.) in a deeply felt way: to cherish a memory.
Chew
To bite and grind with the teeth; masticate.
Childish
...
Choke
(v) 1. to stop the breath of by squeezing or obstructing the windpipe; strangle; stifle.
2. to stop by or as if by strangling or stifling: The sudden wind choked his words.
3. to stop by filling; obstruct; clog: Grease choked the drain.
4. to suppress (a feeling, emotion, etc.) (often followed by back or down): I managed to choke back my tears.
Chronic
(adj) 1.constant; habitual; inveterate: a chronic liar.
2.continuing a long time or recurring frequently: a chronic state of civil war.
3.having long had a disease, habit, weakness, or the like: a chronic invalid.
4.(of a disease) having long duration (opposed to acute ).
Circumstance
a fact or condition connected with or relevant to an event or action.
Cite
To quote as an authority or example, To summon before a court of law.
Clan
a group of people united by actual or perceived kinship and descent.
Claptrap
nonsense, especially pompous or important-sounding nonsense
Classic
(adj) 1.of the first or highest quality, class, or rank:
a classic piece of work.
2.serving as a standard, model, or guide:
the classic method of teaching arithmetic.
Climax
the most important or exciting point in something such as an event or a story, peak
Close
(adj) a short distance away or apart in space or time.
Clothes - Anorak
a type of heavy jacket with a hood, often lined with fur or fake fur. The hood protects the face from freezing temperatures and wind
Clothes - Apparel
another word for clothes, clothing and garments
Clothes - Cardigan
a type of knitted vestment that has an open front
Clothes - Slipper
is a semi-closed type of indoor/outdoor shoe
Clothes - Tracksuit
A tracksuit is an article of clothing consisting of two parts: trousers and a jacket usually with front zipper. It was originally intended for use in sports
Clue
anything that serves to guide or direct in the solution of a problem, mystery, etc.
Clueless
ignorant, unaware, or uninformed: "I remember thinking my mom was clueless when I was a teenager."
Clumsy
awkward in movement or in handling things.
Coach
...
Coalition
An alliance, especially a temporary one, of people, factions, parties, or nations.
Coddle
to treat with extreme or excessive care or kindness
Cognitive
aware, perceptive
Coincide (with)
occur at or during the same time.
Collaborate
1. to work, one with another; cooperate, as on a literary work: They collaborated on a novel.
2. to cooperate, usually willingly, with an enemy nation, especially with an enemy occupying one's country: He collaborated with the Nazis during World War II.
Collaboration
1. the act or process of collaborating.
2. a product resulting from collaboration: This dictionary is a collaboration of many minds.
Collapse
(v): (of a structure) fall down or in; give way.
(of a person) fall down and become unconscious, typically through illness or injury.
(n): an instance of a structure falling down or in.
Collate
to assemble pages in the correct order
Collect
bring or gather together (things, typically when scattered or widespread).
Collision
colliding of two or more objects, crash
Combat
Fighting, especially armed battle; strife. See Synonyms at conflict.
Come across
Also, come upon. to find or encounter, especially by chance: "I came across this picture when I was cleaning out the attic. We suddenly came upon a deer while walking in the woods."
Come out ahead
To win: Who came out ahead in the poll?
Come to an end
1. Conclude, terminate, as in the familiar proverb, All things come to an end.
2. (come to a bad end);(come to no good) Have a bad outcome or die in an unpleasant way. For example, I always suspected this venture would come to no good, or Her parents feared he would come to a bad end.
Come up
1. (of an issue, situation, or problem) occur or present itself, especially unexpectedly. "whatever comes up, we'll be ready"
2. (of the sun) to rise
3. to begin: a wind came up
Come up with
Produce, supply; also, discover. "Henry always comes up with the wrong answer"
come short
fail to reach a goal or standard. "we're so close to getting the job done, but we keep coming up short"
Comfort
...
Comfortable
...
Command
(n): an authoritative order.
(v): give an authoritative order.
commercial
(adj) 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of commerce.
(n) 1. Radio and Television. a paid advertisement or promotional announcement.
Commit
1. To do, perform, or perpetrate "to commit murder" "to commit an error"
2. To bind or obligate, as by a pledge. "to commit oneself to a promise" "to be committed to a course of action."
Common
1. belonging equally to, or shared alike by, two or more or all in question: "common property" "common interests"
2. pertaining or belonging equally to an entire community, nation, or culture; public: "a common language or history; a common water-supply system"
3.widespread; general; ordinary: "common knowledge."
Company
1. a number of individuals assembled or associated together; group of people.
2. a guest or guests: "We're having company for dinner."
3. companionship; fellowship; association: "I always enjoy her company."
companionship
association as companion; fellowship.
accompany
1. to go along or in company with; join in action:
to accompany a friend on a walk.
2. to be or exist in association or company with:
Thunder accompanies lightning.
3. to put in company with; cause to be or go along; associate (usually followed by with):
He accompanied his speech with gestures.
companion
1. a person who is frequently in the company of, associates with, or accompanies another: "my son and his two companions.
2. a person employed to accompany, assist, or live with another in the capacity of a helpful friend.
3. a mate or match for something: "White wine is the usual companion of fish."
Compare
examine and note the similarities or differences
Compensate
Recompense (someone) for loss, suffering, or injury
Compete
to strive to outdo another for acknowledgment, a prize, supremacy, profit, etc.; engage in a contest; vie: "to compete in a race; to compete in business."
Competitor
a person, team, company, etc., that competes; rival.
Compile
1. to put together (documents, selections, or other materials) in one book or work.
2. to make (a book, writing, or the like) of materials from various sources: "to compile an anthology of plays; to compile a graph showing changes in profit."
3. to gather together: "to compile data."
combine
1. to bring into or join in a close union or whole; unite: "She combined the ingredients to make the cake. They combined the two companies."
2. to possess or exhibit in union: "a plan that combines the best features of several other plans."
3. to unite; coalesce: "The clay combined with the water to form a thick paste."
5. to unite for a common purpose; join forces:
"After the two factions combined, they proved invincible."
combination
1. the act of combining or the state of being combined.
2. a number of things combined: "a combination of ideas."
3. something formed by combining: "A chord is a combination of notes."
Complain
To express feelings of pain, dissatisfaction, or resentment.
Compound of
A combination of two or more elements or parts
Comprehensive
extensive, large in scope
Compromise
(n)1. a settlement of differences by mutual concessions; an agreement reached by adjustment of conflicting or opposing claims, principles, etc., by reciprocal modification of demands.
2. the result of such a settlement.
3. something intermediate between different things: "The split-level is a compromise between a ranch house and a multi-storied house."
(v) 4. to settle by a compromise.
5. to expose or make vulnerable to danger, suspicion, scandal, etc.; jeopardize: "a military oversight that compromised the nation's defenses."
Conceive
1. become pregnant with (a child). "she was conceived when her father was 49"
2. form or devise (a plan or idea) in the mind. "the dam project was originally conceived in 1977"
Conceivably
-possibly, even if only a remote possibility
-capable of being conceived; imaginable.
Concentrate
(v) 1. focus one's attention or mental effort on a particular object or activity. "she couldn't concentrate on the movie"
2. gather (people or things) together in numbers or in a mass. "wealth was concentrated in the hands of the governing elite"
(n) 1. a substance made by removing water or other diluting agent; a concentrated form of something, especially food. "apple juice concentrate"
Concept
an abstract idea; a general notion.
Concerned
involved in something, worried
Conclusion
...
Concur
To be of the same opinion; agree
Condemn
Express complete disapproval of, typically in public; censure
Condition
1- the state of something, esp. with regard to its appearance, quality, or working order.
2- a state of affairs that must exist or be brought about before something else is possible or permitted.
3- the circumstances affecting the way in which people live or work, esp. with regard to their safety or well-being.
Conduct
organize and carry out.
Confess
...
Confession
...
Confine
keep or restrict someone or something within certain limits o
Confirm
Antonyms: Deny
Confiscate
take or seize (someone's property) with authority.
Conflict
1. a struggle or clash between opposing forces; battle
2. a state of opposition between ideas, interests, etc; disagreement or controversy
Confront
to face especially in challenge, oppose
Confused
...
Connect
1- put together two or more pieces.
2- join for the purpose of communication.
Consequences
...
Conservation
guarding, protection from decay and destruction
Consider
think carefully about (something), typically before making a decision.
consideration
...
Consist of
...
Consistent
Being in agreement with itself; coherent and uniform
Conspiracy
1. the act of conspiring.
2. an evil, unlawful, treacherous, or surreptitious plan formulated in secret by two or more persons; plot.
3. a combination of persons for a secret, unlawful, or evil purpose: He joined the conspiracy to overthrow the government.
Constant
...
Constraint
a limitation or restriction
Construct
...
Consumption
...
Contagious
infectious. See: disease
Contaminated
rendered unwholesome by contaminants and pollution
Contamination
the presence of a minor and unwanted constituent (contaminant) in a material, in a physical body, in the natural environment, at a workplace
Contemporary
living or occurring at the same time.
Contempt
a powerful feeling of dislike toward somebody or something considered to be worthless, inferior, or undeserving of respect
Contend
To strive in opposition or against difficulties; struggle
Content
pleased, satisfied
Context
1. The part of a text or statement that surrounds a particular word or passage and determines its meaning.
2. The circumstances in which an event occurs; a setting.
Contingency
a future event or circumstance that is possible but cannot be predicted with certainty. "a detailed contract that attempts to provide for all possible contingencies" "Nothing was left to contingency"
Continue
...
Contradict
to argue against the truth or correctness of somebody's statement or claim
Contradictory
mutually opposed or inconsistent
Contribute
To give or supply in common with others; give to a common fund or for a common purpose.
Contrive
1. create or bring about (an object or a situation) by deliberate use of skill and artifice. "his opponents contrived a crisis"
2. manage to do something foolish or create an undesirable situation. "the poor guy in some way contrived to hang himself"
Contrived
- deliberately created rather than arising naturally or spontaneously.
- created or arranged in a way that seems artificial and unrealistic. "the ending of the novel is too pat and contrived"
Control
...
Controversial
giving rise or likely to give rise to public disagreement. "years of wrangling over a controversial bypass"
Controversy
disagreement, typically when prolonged, public, and heated. "he sometimes caused controversy because of his forceful views"
Convenient
fitting in well with a person's needs, activities, and plans.
Convert
(v): cause to change in form, character, or function.
(n): a person who has been persuaded to change their religious faith or other beliefs.
Convict
to declare somebody guilty of a crime in a court of law
Convince
to make somebody sure or certain of something. Or to persuade somebody to believe or do something
Cope
To contend or strive, especially on even terms or with success
Copy
...
Core
1. the tough central part of various fruits, containing the seeds. "quarter the pears, remove the cores then slice again into wedges"
2. the central or most important part of something.
"managers can concentrate on their core activities"
3. the dense central region of a planet, especially the nickel-iron inner part of the earth.
Correct
...
Correlate
(v) have a mutual relationship or connection, in which one thing affects or depends on another. "the study found that success in the educational system correlates highly with class"
(n) each of two or more related or complementary things. "strategies to promote health should pay greater attention to financial hardship and other correlates of poverty"
Cosmopolitan
familiar with many parts of the world
Cost
...
Count
1-determine the number or amount of. 2-have faith or confidence in "count on somebody". 3-name or recite the numbers.
Counter
1. a table or display case on which goods can be shown, business transacted, etc.
2. (in restaurants, luncheonettes, etc.) a long, narrow table with stools or chairs along one side for the patrons, behind which refreshments or meals are prepared and served.
3. a surface for the preparation of food in a kitchen, especially on a low cabinet.
4. anything used in keeping account, as a disk of metal or wood, used in some games, as checkers, for marking a player's position or for keeping score.
Courage
the quality of mind or spirit that enables a person to face difficulty, danger, pain, etc., without fear; bravery.
Courageous
Brave
Courtesy
(n)1. excellence of manners or social conduct; polite behavior.
2. a courteous, respectful, or considerate act or expression.
3. indulgence, consent, or acquiescence: "a "colonel" by courtesy rather than by right."
4. favor, help, or generosity: "The costumes for the play were by courtesy of the local department store."
(adj)1. done or performed as a matter of courtesy or protocol: "a courtesy call on the mayor.
2. offered or provided free by courtesy of the management: "While waiting to board the airplane, we were provided with courtesy coffee."
Coverage (media)
the amount and quality of reporting or analysis given to a particular subject or event
Crack
(n) 1. a line on the surface of something along which it has split without breaking into separate parts. "a hairline crack down the middle of the glass"
2. a sudden sharp or explosive noise. "a loud crack of thunder"
(v) 1. break or cause to break without a complete separation of the parts. "the ice all over the lake had cracked"
2. make or cause to make a sudden sharp or explosive sound. "a shot cracked across the ridge"
(adj) 1. very good, especially at a specified activity or in a specified role. "he is a crack shot"
Cradle
to hold or rock as if in a cradle.
Craft
(n): an activity involving skill in making things by hand.
(v): exercise skill in making (something).
Crappy
of extremely poor quality. "crappy wine"
Creepy
causing an unpleasant feeling of fear or unease.
"the creepy feelings one often gets in a strange house"
Crave
feel a powerful desire for (something).
Craving
A consuming desire a yearning
Create
To cause to exist; bring into being.
Credential
a qualification, achievement, personal quality, or aspect of a person's background, typically when used to indicate that they are suitable for something. "recruitment is based mainly on academic credentials"
Crime
...
Criminal
...
Criticize
...
cross one's mind
(of a thought) occur to one, especially transiently. "it never crossed my mind to leave the tent and live in a house"
Crucial
of extreme importance; vital to the resolution of a crisis
Cruel
Causing suffering; painful
Cry
...
Cue
A signal, such as a word or action, used to prompt another event in a performance, such as an actor's speech or entrance, a change in lighting, or a sound effect.
Cultivate
to work land or prepare soil for growing crops
Curiosity
A desire to know or learn.
Curriculum
the aggregate of courses of study given in a school, college, university, etc.:
The school is adding more science courses to its curriculum.
Dare
1- have the courage to do something.
2- defy or challenge (someone) to do something.
Deal (n)
a particular type of treatment received, esp as the result of an agreement
Deal (v)
to take action with respect to a thing or person
Dealer
...
Debate
To engage in argument by discussing opposing points
Decide
...
Declare
to make known formally, officially, or explicitly
Decorum
1. behavior in keeping with good taste and propriety. "you exhibit remarkable modesty and decorum"
2. etiquette. "he had no idea of funeral decorum"
Decency
1. the state or quality of being decent.
2. conformity to the recognized standard of propriety, good taste, modesty, etc. "she had the decency to come and confess"
Dedicate
1. To set apart for a special use: dedicated their money to scientific research.
2. To commit (oneself) to a particular course of thought or action: dedicated ourselves to starting our own business. See: devote.
Deduct
subtract or take away (an amount or part) from a total. "tax has been deducted from the payments"
Deed
an action that is performed intentionally or consciously. "doing good deeds"
Defeated
having been beaten in a battle or other contest. "the defeated army"
Defend
resist an attack made on (someone or something); protect from harm or danger.
Deficit
- the amount by which something, especially a sum of money, is too small.
- an excess of expenditure or liabilities over income or assets in a given period. "an annual operating deficit"
Define
1. state or describe exactly the nature, scope, or meaning of. "the contract will seek to define the client's obligations"
2. mark out the boundary or limits of. "clearly defined boundaries"
Definitely
without doubt (used for emphasis). "I will definitely be at the airport to meet you"
Degraded
(adj) treated or regarded with contempt or disrespect. "she had felt cheap and degraded"
- reduced in quality; inferior. "it will grow successfully even on degraded land"
Degrading
causing a loss of self-respect; humiliating. "cruel or degrading treatment"
Delegate
(v) to send or appoint (a person) as deputy or representative
Deliberate
done consciously and intentionally.
Deliberately
consciously and intentionally; on purpose.
Delicate
(adj)1. very fine in texture or structure; of intricate workmanship or quality. "a spider's web, strong yet delicate"
2. easily broken or damaged; fragile. "delicate china"
3. Pleasing to the senses, especially in a subtle way. "a delicate flavor" "a delicate violin passage."
Delight
(v) 1. please (someone) greatly. "an experience guaranteed to delight both young and old"
(n) 1. great pleasure. "she took great delight in telling your story"
Delinquency
minor crime, esp. that committed by young people.
Deliver
1. bring and hand over (a letter, parcel, or ordered goods) to the proper recipient or address. "the products should be delivered on time"
2. state in a formal manner. "the President will deliver a speech"
3. assist in the birth of. "the village midwife delivered the baby"
- give birth to. "the number of women delivering their babies in hospitals increased"
Delude
To deceive the mind or judgment of
Demand
(n) An urgent requirement or need.
(v)1. To ask for urgently or peremptorily.
2. To claim as just or due
Demonstrate
To show clearly and deliberately; manifest
Denounce
to criticize or condemn something publicly and harshly
Dense
closely compacted in substance. "dense volcanic rock"
Deny
Antonyms: Confirm
Depend
1. be controlled or determined by. "differences in earnings depended on a wide variety of factors"
2. rely on. "the kind of person you could depend on"
Dependent
1. contingent on or determined by. "the various benefits will be dependent on length of service"
2. requiring someone or something for financial, emotional, or other support. "an economy heavily dependent on oil exports"
Depict
-show or represent by a drawing, painting, or other art form.
-portray in words; describe. "youth is depicted as a time of vitality and good health"
Deprivation
the damaging lack of material benefits considered to be basic necessities in a society. "low wages mean that 3.75 million people suffer serious deprivation"
Deprive
deny (a person or place) the possession or use of something. "the city was deprived of its water supplies"
Describe
give a description of
Deserve
...
Desirable
...
Desire
...
Despair
(v) lose or be without hope. "we should not despair"
(n) the complete loss or absence of hope. "driven to despair, he throws himself under a train"
Desperate
feeling, showing, or involving a hopeless sense that a situation is so bad as to be impossible to deal with.
Despise
to look down on with contempt; scorn
Destination
the place to which someone or something is going or being sent.
Destiny
the events that will necessarily happen to a particular person or thing in the future.
Destroy
...
Detect
discover or identify the presence or existence of.
Determination
Firmness of purpose; resolve
Determine
To decide or settle (a dispute, for example) conclusively and authoritatively.
Devastated
Destroy or ruin (something)
Develop a skill
...
Device
...
Divine
of, from, or like God or a god. "heroes with divine powers"
Devote
To give or apply (one's time, attention, or self) entirely to a particular activity, pursuit, cause, or person.
Diagnose
identify the nature of (an illness or other problem) by examination of the symptoms. "doctors diagnosed a rare and fatal liver disease"
Dial
(n) a face of a clock, watch, or sundial that is marked to show units of time.
(v) call (a telephone number) by turning a disk with numbered holes or pressing a set of buttons. "he dialed room service"
Dictate
1. to say or read (something) aloud for another person to transcribe or for a machine to record: "to dictate some letters to a secretary."
2. to prescribe or lay down authoritatively or peremptorily; command unconditionally: "to dictate peace terms to a conquered enemy."
Different
...
Difficult
...
Digest
break down (food) in the alimentary canal into substances that can be absorbed and used by the body.
Digestion
the process of breaking down food by mechanical and enzymatic action in the alimentary canal into substances that can be used by the body.
Dignity
-the state or quality of being worthy of honor or respect. "a man of dignity and unbending principle"
-a sense of pride in oneself; self-respect. "it was beneath his dignity to shout"
Diminished
made smaller or less. "a diminished role for local government"
Diminish
make or become less. "a tax whose purpose is to diminish spending"
Dingy
Darkened with smoke and grime; dirty or discolored. Gloomy
Direct
(adj): extending or moving from one place to another by the shortest way without changing direction or stopping.
(v): 1- control the operations of; manage or govern.
2- aim (something) in a particular direction or at a particular person.
Dirt
...
Disappear
cease to be visible.
Discard
get rid of (someone or something) as no longer useful or desirable
Discern
-perceive or recognize (something). "I can discern no difference between the two policies"

-distinguish (someone or something) with difficulty by sight or with the other senses. "she could faintly discern the shape of a skull"
Discipline
(n) 1.the practice of training people to obey rules or a code of behavior, using punishment to correct disobedience. "a lack of proper parental and school discipline"
2.a branch of knowledge, typically one studied in higher education. "sociology is a fairly new discipline"
(v) train (someone) to obey rules or a code of behavior, using punishment to correct disobedience. "many parents have been afraid to discipline their children"
Disconcert
disturb the composure of; unsettle. "the abrupt change of subject disconcerted her"
Disconnect
1- make disconnected, disjoin or unfasten.
2- pull the plug of (electrical appliances).
Discontinued
stopped permanently or temporarily
Discount
a deduction from the usual cost of something, typically given for prompt or advance payment or to a special category of buyers. "many stores will offer a discount on bulk purchases"
Discover
...
Discredit
To damage in reputation; disgrace.
Discrimination
unfair treatment of a person, racial group, minority, etc; action based on prejudice
Disease
a disordered or abnormal condition of an organ or other part of an organism resulting from the effect of genetic or developmental errors, infection, nutritional deficiency, toxicity, or unfavorable environmental factors; illness; sickness. see: Contagious
Disgrace
shame or loss of respect arising from bad behavior
Disguise
(v) give (someone or oneself) a different appearance in order to conceal one's identity. "he disguised himself as a girl"
(n)a means of altering one's appearance or concealing one's identity. "his bizarre disguise drew stares from fellow shoppers"
Disorder
lack of order or regular arrangement. "confusion: Your room is in utter disorder"
Disparate
(adj) essentially different in kind; not allowing comparison. "they inhabit disparate worlds of thought"
Dispatch
(v) 1. send off to a destination or for a purpose.
"he dispatched messages back to base"
2. deal with (a task, problem, or opponent) quickly and efficiently. "they dispatched the opposition"
(n) the sending of someone or something to a destination or for a purpose. "a resolution authorizing the dispatch of a peacekeeping force"
Dispose
1. get rid of by throwing away or giving or selling to someone else. "whose responsibility is it to dispose of scrap materials?"
2. arrange in a particular position. "the chief disposed his attendants in a circle"
Disproportionate
Out of proportion, as in size, shape, or amount. too large or too small in comparison with something else.
Dispute
(n) a disagreement, argument, or debate. "a territorial dispute between the two countries"
(v) 1. argue about (something); discuss heatedly. "I disputed the charge on the bill"
2. compete for; strive to win. "the two drivers crashed while disputing the lead"
Disrupt
interrupt (an event, activity, or process) by causing a disturbance or problem. "a rail strike that could disrupt both passenger and freight service"
Dissolve
1. (with reference to a solid) become or cause to become incorporated into a liquid so as to form a solution. "glucose dissolves easily in water"
2. close down or dismiss (an assembly or official body). "the country's president can dissolve parliament under certain circumstances"
Distinct
(adj) 1. recognizably different in nature from something else of a similar type. "the patterns of spoken language are distinct from those of writing"
2. readily distinguishable by the senses. "a distinct smell of nicotine"
Distinction
1. a difference or contrast between similar things or people. "there is a sharp distinction between domestic politics and international politics"
2. excellence that sets someone or something apart from others. "a novelist of distinction"
Distinguish
recognize or treat (someone or something) as different. "the child is perfectly capable of distinguishing reality from fantasy"
Distract
prevent (someone) from giving full attention to something. "don't allow noise to distract you from your work"
Distressed
Suffering from anxiety, sorrow, or pain
Distribute
To divide and dispense in portions.
District
a region marked off for administrative or other purposes
Disturb
interfere with the normal arrangement or functioning of. "being sent to jail had apparently not disturbed his cheerfulness"
Disturbing
causing anxiety; worrying. "disturbing unemployment figures"
Diverse
showing a great deal of variety; very different. "a culturally diverse population"
Diversity
the state of being diverse; variety. "there was considerable diversity in the style of the reports"
Divide
To separate into parts, sections, groups, or branches
Doctrine
a rule or principle that forms the basis of a belief, theory, or policy
Dominate
have a commanding influence on; exercise control over. "the company dominates the market for operating system software"
Dominion
1. sovereignty; control. "man's attempt to establish dominion over nature"
Donate
give (money or goods) for a good cause, for example to a charity. "the proceeds will be donated to an AIDS awareness charity"
Dose
a quantity of a medicine or drug taken or recommended to be taken at a particular time. "he took a dose of cough medicine"
Double cross
deceive or betray (a person with whom one is supposedly cooperating). "he was blackmailed into double-crossing his own government"
Doubt
(n) a feeling of uncertainty or lack of conviction. "some doubt has been cast upon the authenticity of this account"
(v) feel uncertain about. "I doubt my ability to do the job"
Drag
pull (someone or something) along forcefully, roughly, or with difficulty. "we dragged the boat up the beach"
Dramatic
(of an event or circumstance) sudden and striking. "a dramatic increase in recorded crime"
Drastic
likely to have a strong or far-reaching effect; radical and extreme. "a drastic reduction of staffing levels"
Drawer
a box that slides into and out of a piece of furniture (such as a desk) and that is used to store things
Drawn To
attracted to
Dreadful
causing or involving great suffering, fear, or unhappiness; extremely bad or serious. "there's been a dreadful accident"
Drift
(v) 1. be carried slowly by a current of air or water.
"the cabin cruiser started to drift downstream"
2. (especially of snow or leaves) be blown into heaps by the wind. "fallen leaves start to drift in the gutters"
(n) 1. a continuous slow movement from one place to another. "there was a drift to the towns"
2. the general intention or meaning of an argument or someone's remarks. "maybe I'm too close to the forest to see the trees, if you catch my drift"
Drive (someone) crazy
...
Driven
1. being under compulsion, as to succeed or excel."a driven young man who was fiercely competitive."
2. propelled or motivated by something —used in combination <results-driven>.
Drop
(n): a small round or pear-shaped portion of liquid that hangs or falls or adheres to a surface.
(v): let or make (something) fall vertically.
Drop by
To stop in for a short visit.
Drop by/in
call informally and briefly as a visitor.
Drop off
Antonyms: pick up
Dry sense of humor
A very good sense of humour/fun where the humour is not immediately obvious at first and is usually used by someone who appears to be serious at the same time.
Due
(adj) expected at or planned for at a certain time.
"the baby's due in August"
(n)1. a person's right; what is owed to someone.
"he attracts more criticism than is his due"
2. an obligatory payment; a fee. "he had paid union dues for years"
Dumb
-(of a person) unable to speak, most typically because of congenital deafness.
"he was born deaf, dumb, and blind"
-stupid
Dump
a site for depositing garbage.
Dust
(n) fine, dry powder consisting of tiny particles of earth or waste matter lying on the ground or on surfaces or carried in the air. "the car sent up clouds of dust"
(v) remove the dust from the surface of (something) by wiping or brushing it. "I broke the vase I had been dusting"
Dwell
live in or at a specified place. "groups of gypsies still dwell in these caves"
Dwelling
a physical structure used for residential purpose
Eagerness
enthusiasm to do or to have something; keenness. "the player showed eagerness to play"
Eager
(of a person) wanting to do or have something very much. "the man was eager to please"
Earlier
...
Earn
acquire or deserve by one's efforts or actions
Edit
prepare (written material) for publication by correcting, condensing, or otherwise modifying it.
Effective
successful in producing a desired or intended result.
Efficient
(especially of a system or machine) achieving maximum productivity with minimum wasted effort or expense. "fluorescent lamps are efficient at converting electricity into light"
Either way
whichever of two given alternatives is the case. "I'm not sure whether he is trying to be clever or controversial, but either way, such writing smacks of racism"
Elaborate
(v) develop or present (a theory, policy, or system) in detail. "the key idea of the book is expressed in the title and elaborated in the text"
(adj) involving many carefully arranged parts or details; detailed and complicated in design and planning. "elaborate security precautions"
Element
a part or aspect of something abstract, especially one that is essential or characteristic. "the death had all the elements of a great tabloid story"
Elementary
of or relating to the most rudimentary aspects of a subject. "the six stages take students from elementary to advanced level"
Eliminate
completely remove or get rid of (something). "a policy that would eliminate inflation"
Eligible
having the right to do or obtain something; satisfying the appropriate conditions. "customers who are eligible for discounts"
Embargo
an official ban on trade or other commercial activity with a particular country.
Embarrassed
feeling or showing embarrassment.
Embarrassment
a feeling of self-consciousness, shame, or awkwardness
Emblem
a heraldic device or symbolic object as a distinctive badge of a nation, organization, or family. "America's national emblem, the bald eagle"
Embrace
1. hold (someone) closely in one's arms, especially as a sign of affection. "Aunt Sophie embraced her warmly"
2. accept or support (a belief, theory, or change) willingly and enthusiastically. "besides traditional methods, artists are embracing new technology"
(n) an act of accepting or supporting something willingly or enthusiastically. "their eager embrace of foreign influences"
Emerge
move out of or away from something and come into view. "black ravens emerged from the fog"
Emit
produce and discharge (something, especially gas or radiation). "coal-fired power stations continue to emit large quantities of sulfur dioxide"
Emission
the production and discharge of something, especially gas or radiation. "the effects of lead emission on health"
Emotion
a natural instinctive state of mind deriving from one's circumstances, mood, or relationships with others. "she was attempting to control her emotions"
Emotional
...
Empathy
the ability to understand and share the feelings of another.
Emphasis
special importance, value, or prominence given to something.
Emphasize
give special importance or prominence to (something) in speaking or writing.
Employ
1. give work to (someone) and pay them for it.
"the firm employs 150 people"
2. make use of. "the methods they have employed to collect the data"
Empty
(v) remove all the contents of (a container). "we empty the till at closing time"
(adj) 1. containing nothing; not filled or occupied. "she put down her empty cup"
2. (of words or a gesture) lacking meaning or sincerity. "their promises were empty words"
Enclose
(v) 1. surround or close off on all sides. "the entire estate was enclosed with walls"
2. place (something) in an envelope together with a letter. "I enclose a copy of the job description"
Encounter
1. unexpectedly be faced with or experience (something hostile or difficult). "we have encountered one small problem"
2. meet (someone) unexpectedly. "what do we know about the people we encounter in our daily lives?"
Encourage
give support, confidence, or hope to (someone). "we were encouraged by the success of this venture"
End
(n) 1. a final part of something, especially a period of time, an activity, or a story. "the end of the year"
2. a part or person's share of an activity. "you're going to honour your end of the deal"
(v) 1. come or bring to a final point; finish. "when the war ended, policy changed"
End up
1. to become eventually; turn out to be "he ended up a thief"
2. to arrive, esp by a circuitous or lengthy route or process "he ended up living in New Zealand"
Endorse
declare one's public approval or support of. "the report was endorsed by the college"
Endure
1. suffer (something painful or difficult) patiently. "it seemed impossible that anyone could endure such pain"
2. remain in existence; last. "these cities have endured through time"
Energy
1. the strength and vitality required for sustained physical or mental activity. "changes in the levels of vitamins can affect energy and well-being"
2. power derived from the utilization of physical or chemical resources, especially to provide light and heat or to work machines. "nuclear energy"
Enforce
compel observance of or compliance with (a law, rule, or obligation). "the role of the police is to enforce the law"
Engage
1. occupy or attract (someone's interest or attention). "he ploughed on, trying to outline his plans and engage Sutton's attention"
2. participate or become involved in. "organizations engage in a variety of activities"
3. enter into combat with (an enemy). "tank and infantry units engaged the enemy"
Engrave
cut or carve (a text or design) on the surface of a hard object. "my name was engraved on the ring"
Enlist
1. enrol or be enrolled in the armed services. "he enlisted in the Royal Naval Air Service"
2. engage (a person or their help or support). "the company enlisted the help of independent consultants"
Enormous
very large in size, quantity, or extent.
Enrol
officially register as a member of an institution or a student on a course. "he enrolled in drama school"
Ensure
make certain that (something) will occur or be the case.
"the client must ensure that accurate records are kept"
Entail
involve (something) as a necessary or inevitable part or consequence. "a situation which entails considerable risks"
Enter
1. come or go into (a place). "she entered the kitchen"
2. begin to be involved in. "in 1941 America entered the war"
Enthralled
capture the fascinated attention of. "she had been so enthralled by the adventure that she had hardly noticed the cold"
Enthusiasm
passionate interest in or eagerness to do something
Enthusiast
a person who is highly interested in a particular activity or subject.
Entire
with no part left out; whole.
Entity
a thing with distinct and independent existence. "Church and empire were fused in a single entity"
Entrusted
to give something to another person to be responsible fo
Enviable
arousing or likely to arouse envy.
Epidemic
an epidemic occurs when new cases of a certain disease, in a given human population, and during a given period, substantially exceed what is expected based on recent experience.
Equal
...
Equality
...
Equity
the quality of being fair and impartial. "equity of treatment"
Equivalent
equal in value, amount, function, meaning, etc. "one unit is equivalent to one glass of wine"
Eradicate
destroy completely; put an end to.
Erode
1. (of wind, water, or other natural agents) gradually wear away (soil, rock, or land). "the cliffs on this coast have been eroded by the sea"
2. gradually destroy or be gradually destroyed. "this humiliation has eroded what confidence Jean has"
Escape
...
Escort
One or more persons accompanying another to guide, protect, or show honor.
Essential
Basic or indispensable; necessary
Establish
1- set up (an organization, system, or set of rules) on a firm or permanent basis.
2- achieve permanent acceptance or recognition for.
Estimate
roughly calculate or judge the value, number, quantity, or extent of.
Evaluate
form an idea of the amount, number, or value of; assess. "the study will assist in evaluating the impact of recent changes"
synonyms: assess
Evasion
1. the action of evading something.
2. an act or instance of escaping, avoiding, or shirking something "evasion of one's duty."
3. an indirect answer; a prevaricating excuse.
Eventually
in the end, especially after a long delay, dispute, or series of problems. "eventually, after midnight, I arrived at the hotel"
Every man for himself
Each individual puts his or her own interests foremost. For example, In this company no one helps anyone-it's every man for himself.
Eviction
action by a landlord that compels a tenant to leave the premises
Evident
clearly seen or understood; obvious. "she ate the biscuits with evident enjoyment"
Evolve
develop gradually, esp. from a simple to a more complex form.
Exaggerate
to magnify beyond the limits of truth; overstate; represent disproportionately
Examine
1. inspect (someone or something) thoroughly in order to determine their nature or condition. "a doctor examined me and said I might need a caesarean"
2. test the knowledge or proficiency of (someone) by requiring them to answer questions or perform tasks. "the colleges set standards by examining candidates"
Exceed
be greater in number or size than (a quantity, number, or other measurable things). "production costs have exceeded £60,000"
Excel
To show superiority; surpass others
Exceptional
unusual; not typical.
Excess
an amount of something that is more than necessary, permitted, or desirable.
Excessive
more than is necessary, normal, or desirable; immoderate.
Exchange
the act of giving or taking one thing in return for another
Excited
...
Exclamation
a sudden cry or remark expressing surprise, strong emotion, or pain. "an exclamation of amazement"
Exclude
deny (someone) access to a place, group, or privilege.
"the public were excluded from the board meeting"
Excuse
(v) 1. seek to lessen the blame attaching to (a fault or offence); try to justify. "he did nothing to hide or excuse Jacob's cruelty"
2. release (someone) from a duty or requirement. "it will not be possible to excuse you from attendance"
(n) a reason or explanation given to justify a fault or offence. "there can be no excuse for any further delay"
Execute
1. put (a plan, order, or course of action) into effect.
"the corporation executed a series of financial deals"
2. carry out a sentence of death on (a legally condemned person). "he was convicted of treason and executed"
Exist
have objective reality or being. "dossiers existed on almost everyone of prominence"
Expand
become or make larger or more extensive.
antonyms: shrink, contract"
Expansion
...
Expect
...
Expense
the cost incurred in or required for something. "conference rooms were equipped at great expense"
Experience
direct personal participation or observation; actual knowledge or contact
Experienced
x= inexperienced
Experiment
A test under controlled conditions that is made to demonstrate a known truth, examine the validity of a hypothesis, or determine the efficacy of something previously untried.
Expertise
expert skill or knowledge in a particular field. "technical expertise"
synonyms: skill
Explain
To make plain or comprehensible.
Exploit
(v) 1. make full use of and derive benefit from (a resource). "500 companies sprang up to exploit this new technology"
2. make use of (a situation) in a way considered unfair or underhand. "the company was exploiting a legal loophole"
Expose
make (something) visible, typically by uncovering it.
Exposure
1. the state of having no protection from something harmful. "the dangers posed by exposure to asbestos"
2. the revelation of something secret, especially something embarrassing or damaging. "she took her life for fear of exposure as a spy"
Express
To make known the feelings or opinions of (oneself), as by statement or art.
Expression
1. the action of making known one's thoughts or feelings. "the prisoners developed a dialect as an everyday means of expression"
2. a look on someone's face that conveys a particular emotion. "a sad expression"
Expulsion
the action of forcing someone to leave an organization.
"his expulsion from the union"
Extra
added to an existing or usual amount or number.
Extraordinary
very unusual or remarkable. "the extraordinary plumage of the male"
Extreme
reaching a high or the highest degree; very great.
Fabulous
amazingly or almost unbelievably great or impressive
Fail
(v) be unsuccessful in achieving one's goal. "he failed in his attempt to secure election"
(n) a mark which is not high enough to pass an examination or test. "a fail grade"
Fairly
1. with justice. "he could not fairly be accused of wasting police time"
2. to a moderately high degree. "I was fairly certain she had nothing to do with the affair"
Faithful
faithful, loyal, constant, staunch, steadfast, resolute mean firm in adherence to whatever one owes allegiance. faithful implies unswerving adherence to a person or thing or to the oath or promise by which a tie was contracted <faithful to her promise>.
Fall
(n): an act of falling or collapsing; a sudden uncontrollable descent.
(v): move downward, typically rapidly and freely without control, from a higher to a lower level.
See: rise
Fall apart
1. To break down; collapse: The rickety chair fell apart.
2. To suffer a nervous breakdown: He fell apart after years as a POW.
Fall For Someone
to fall in love with somebody
Fall Out
argue with someone and never speak to him/her again
Familiar
well known from long or close association. "their faces will be familiar to many of you"
Famine
A drastic, wide-reaching food shortage
Fancy
elaborate in structure or decoration. "the furniture was very fancy"
Fatal
causing death. "a fatal accident"
synonyms: deadly, lethal
Fate
the development of events outside a person's control, regarded as predetermined by a supernatural power.
"fate decided his course for him"
Fault
an unattractive or unsatisfactory feature, especially in a piece of work or in a person's character.
"my worst fault is impatience"
Faulty
not working or made correctly; having defects.
"a faulty brake"
Favour
1. approval, support, or liking for someone or something. "training is looked upon with favour by many employers"
2. an act of kindness beyond what is due or usual.
"I've come to ask you a favour"
Feel
(v) 1. be aware of (a person or object) through touching or being touched. "she felt someone touch her shoulder"
2. experience (an emotion or sensation). "I felt a sense of excitement"
(n) 1. an act of touching something to examine it.
2. a sensation given by an object or material when touched. "nylon cloth with a cotton feel"
Felon
someone who has been legally convicted of a crime. Technically, a felon is anyone who's been convicted of a serious crime, but you can use felon to describe anyone you think has done something terrible.
Fetch
go for and then bring back (someone or something) for someone. "he ran to fetch help"
Figure out
solve or discover the cause of a problem.
"he was trying to figure out why the camera wasn't working"
File
submit (a legal document, application, or charge) to be placed on record by the appropriate authority.
"criminal charges were filed against the firm"
Fill
(v) 1. cause (a space or container) to become full or almost full. "I filled up the bottle with water"
2. appoint a person to hold (a vacant post).
"the board contacted him to say they had already filled the position"
(n) an amount of something which will occupy all the space in a container.
"a fill of tobacco"
Financial
relating to finance.
"an independent financial adviser"
Find out
to learn by study, observation, or search : discover.
Fire
(v) 1. discharge a gun or other weapon in order to propel (a bullet or projectile). "he fired a shot at the retreating prisoners"
2. dismiss (an employee) from a job. "I had to fire men who've been with me for years"
Fit
(adj) 1. of a suitable quality, standard, or type to meet the required purpose. "the house was not fit for human habitation"
2. in good health, especially because of regular physical exercise. "my family keep fit by walking and cycling"
(v)1. be of the right shape and size for. "those jeans still fit me"
2. be compatible or in agreement with; match. "the landlord had not seen anyone fitting that description"
3. be suitable or appropriate for. "the punishment should fit the crime"
(n) 1. the particular way in which something, especially a garment or component, fits. "the dress was a perfect fit"
2. the particular way in which things match. "a close fit between teachers' qualifications and their teaching responsibilities"
Fit In
be socially compatible with other members of a group.
"he feels he should become tough to fit in with his friends"
Fix
(v) 1. fasten (something) securely in a particular place or position. "they had candles fixed to their helmets"
2. mend or repair. "you've forgotten to fix that shelf"
Flame
a hot glowing body of ignited gas that is generated by something on fire. "the car was engulfed in flames"
Flare up
(n) a sudden outburst of something, especially violence or hostility. "a flare-up between the two countries"
Flat
(adj) 1. having a level surface; without raised areas or indentations. "he sat down on a flat rock"
2. lacking emotion; dull and lifeless. "'I'm sorry,' he said, in a flat voice"
Flaw
(n) a mark, blemish, or other imperfection which mars a substance or object. "a flaw in the glass"
synonyms: defect
(v) mar, weaken, or invalidate (something). "the computer game was flawed by poor programming"
Flawless
without any imperfections or defects; perfect.
"her smooth flawless skin"
Fled
past and past participle of flee, run away from a place or situation of danger.
Flee: run away from a place or situation of danger.
"to escape the fighting, his family fled from their village"
Flexible
- capable of bending easily without breaking.
"flexible rubber seals"
- able to be easily modified to respond to altered circumstances. "small businesses which are dependent on flexible working hours"
synonyms: adaptable
Flimsy
insubstantial and easily damaged.
"a flimsy barrier"
Flirt With
try to make someone interested
Flood (v)
1- cover or submerge (a place or area) with water.
2- arrive in overwhelming amounts or quantities.
Flourishing
developing rapidly and successfully; thriving.
"a flourishing career"
Flow
(n): the action or fact of moving along in a steady, continuous stream.
(v): go from one place to another in a steady stream, typically in large numbers.
Flush
(v) 1. (of a person's skin, face, etc.) become red and hot, typically as the result of illness or strong emotion.
"Rachel flushed angrily"
2. cleanse (something, especially a toilet) by causing large quantities of water to pass through it. "she flushed the loo"
(n) 1. a reddening of the face, skin, etc., typically caused by illness or strong emotion. "a flush of embarrassment rose to her cheeks"
2. a sudden rush of intense emotion. "I was carried away in a flush of enthusiasm"
Focus of attention
center of attention
Centerpiece
an ornament or display placed in the middle of a dining table.
- an item, issue, etc. intended to be a focus of attention.
"a domestic programme with health care as the centrepiece"
Follow
1. go or come after (a person or thing proceeding ahead); move or travel behind.
"she went back into the house, and Ben followed her"
2. come after in time or order. "the six years that followed his restoration"
Foolproof
(adj) incapable of going wrong or being misused.
"a foolproof security system"
For Good
forever
For instance
for example
Forbid
refuse to allow (something).
Forecast
predict or estimate (a future event or trend).
"rain is forecast for Scotland"
Forensic
(adj) of, relating to, or denoting the application of scientific methods and techniques to the investigation of crime.
(n) a laboratory or department responsible for tests used in detection of crime.
Forfeit
(v) lose or be deprived of (property or a right or privilege) as a penalty for wrongdoing. "those unable to meet their taxes were liable to forfeit their estates"
(n) a fine or penalty for wrongdoing. "the loser must pay a forfeit"
(adj) lost or surrendered as a penalty for wrongdoing. "his possessions were declared forfeit"
Penalty
a punishment imposed for breaking a law, rule, or contract. "the charge carries a maximum penalty of ten years' imprisonment"
Forgive
stop feeling angry or resentful toward (someone) for an offense, flaw, or mistake.
Fortune
an amount of wealth or material prosperity, esp, when unqualified, a great amount.
Fraction
A small part; a bit
Fragile
(of an object) easily broken or damaged. "fragile items such as glass and china"
Fragment
a piece, usually a small piece, broken off something or left when something is shattered
Framed for "a crime"
to contrive the evidence against (an innocent person) so that a verdict of guilty is assured
Frankly
honestly, openly
Freak out
to be or cause to be in a heightened emotional state, such as that of fear, anger, or excitement
Frequently
many times at short intervals
Fresh
...
Frill
a strip of gathered or pleated material sewn on to a garment or larger piece of material as a decorative edging or ornament.
"a full skirt with a wide frill"
From scratch
from the very beginning, especially without making use of or relying on any previous work for assistance.
"he built his own computer company from scratch"
Frustrated
1. feeling or expressing distress and annoyance resulting from an inability to change or achieve something. "young people get frustrated with the system"
2. (of a person) unable to follow or be successful in a particular career. "a frustrated actor"
Frustrating
cause (someone) to feel upset or annoyed as a result of being unable to change or achieve something.
"it can be very frustrating to find that the size you want isn't there"
Frustration
1. the feeling of being upset or annoyed as a result of being unable to change or achieve something. "tears of frustration rolled down her cheeks"
2. the prevention of the progress, success, or fulfilment of something. "the frustration of their wishes"
Fulfill
1. to carry out, or bring to realization, as a prophecy or promise.
2. to perform or do, as duty; obey or follow, as commands.
Full
...
Fume
an amount of gas or vapour that smells strongly or is dangerous to inhale.
"clouds of exhaust fumes spewed by cars"
Function
(n) 1. an activity that is natural to or the purpose of a person or thing. "bridges perform the function of providing access across water"
2. a relation or expression involving one or more variables. "the function (bx + c)"
(v) work or operate in a proper or particular way. "her liver is functioning normally"
Fund
(n): A source of supply.
(v): To provide money for paying off the interest or principal of (a debt).
Fundamental
(adj) forming a necessary base or core; of central importance. "the protection of fundamental human rights", synonyms: basic, foundational
(n) a central or primary rule or principle on which something is based. "two courses cover the fundamentals of microbiology", synonyms: basics, essentials
Further
(adv) 1- at, to, or by a greater distance (used to indicate the extent to which one thing or person is or becomes distant from another).
2- over a greater expanse of space or time; for a longer way. "we had walked further than I realized"
(adj) more distant in space than something else of the same kind. "two men were standing at the further end of the clearing"
(v) help the progress or development of (something); promote. "he had depended on using them to further his own career"
Furthermore
in addition; besides (used to introduce a fresh consideration in an argument). "this species has a quiet charm and, furthermore, is an easy garden plant"
Furtively
done in a way that is intended to escape notice
Fuss - why all the fuss
a display of unnecessary or excessive excitement, activity, or interest. "I don't know what all the fuss is about"
Gain
To come into possession or use of; acquire
Game changer
an event, idea, or procedure that effects a significant shift in the current way of doing or thinking about something. "a potential game changer that could revitalize the entire US aerospace industry"
Gap
a break or hole in an object or between two objects.
Gather
1. come together; assemble or accumulate.
"as soon as a crowd gathered, the police came"
2. bring together and take in from scattered places or sources. "information that we have gathered about people"
Gaze
look steadily and intently, especially in admiration, surprise, or thought. "he could only gaze at her in astonishment"
Generate
bring into existence; produce (energy)
Generation
1. all of the people born and living at about the same time, regarded collectively.
"one of his generation's finest songwriters"
2. the production or creation of something.
"methods of electricity generation"
Generous
more than adequate; willing to give and share unstintingly; not petty in character and mind
Genuine
1. Actually possessing the alleged or apparent attribute or character: genuine leather.
2. Not spurious or counterfeit; authentic. See Synonyms at authentic.
3. Free from hypocrisy or dishonesty; sincere.
Gesture
a movement of part of the body, especially a hand or the head, to express an idea or meaning.
"Alex made a gesture of apology"
Get - Get away with
To escape the consequences of (a blameworthy act, for example): got away with cheating.
Get (someone) in trouble
...
Take a breather
take a short break from one's activities in order to relax
Get Along/On
have a good relationship
Get into
1. To become involved in: got into trouble by stealing cars.
2. Informal To be interested in: got into gourmet cooking.
3. To affect, especially negatively: What's gotten into you lately?
Get lost
"informal" go away (used as an expression of anger or impatience).
"Why don't you leave me alone? Go on, get lost!"
Get Off
leave a vehicle, aircraft, etc..
Get out
...
Get rid of
to dispose (of); to remove; to abolish; to lose
Get to
1. To begin. Used with the present participle: got to reminiscing.
2. To start to deal with: didn't get to the housework until Sunday.
Gimmick
advertising ploy
Give (someone) the brush off
to repel someone; to ignore someone. (see also brush off.) The manager gave her the brushoff when she asked for a raise.
Give (someone) the eye
to look at someone in a way that communicates romantic interest. Ann gave John the eye. It really surprised him. Tom kept giving Sally the
Give A Hard Time
1. (informal) to criticize someone and make them feel guilty about something that they have done (often + about ) I came home late one night last week and she's been giving me a hard time about it ever since.
2. to treat someone severely or to cause difficulties for them She'd always wanted to be a teacher, but those kids gave her a really hard time.
Glance
(v) take a brief or hurried look. "Ginny glanced at her watch"
(n) a brief or hurried look. "I stole a glance at John"
Glimpse
(v)see or perceive briefly or partially. "he glimpsed a figure standing in the shade"
(n) a momentary or partial view. "she caught a glimpse of the ocean"
Go-getter
an aggressively enterprising person.
"boys are expected to be assertive go-getters"
Go Out
to date
Go out of business
to stop doing commerce or business. "The new shop will probably go out of business if sales don't get better." "I have to work hard to keep from going out of business."
Go over
1. consider, examine, or check (something). "I want to go over these plans with you again"
2. change one's allegiance or religion. "he went over to the pro-English party"
Go over the books
to check and analyze the accounting records of a company."We hired an outside accountant to go over our books."
Go under
1. (of a business) become bankrupt. synonyms: go bankrupt
2. (of a person) die or suffer an emotional collapse.
Go wrong
To go amiss; turn out badly: What went wrong with their business?
God forbid
May God prevent something from happening or being the case. For example, God forbid that they actually encounter a bear
Good Call
Standard reply to something agreeable or satisfactory
Good-For-Nothing
worthless; of no use
Goofy
Silly; ridiculous
Gorgeous
beautiful; very attractive
Gourmet
a connoisseur of fine food and drink
Grab
(v) grasp or seize suddenly and roughly. "she grabbed him by the shirt collar"
Grant
to agree to do, give, or allow (something asked for or hoped for)
Grateful
Appreciative of benefits received; thankful
Gratification
the pleasurable emotional reaction of happiness in response to a fulfillment of a desire or goal
Gratitude
The state of being grateful; thankfulness.
Grazing
field or plot of ground where livestock are grazed, pastureland
Grow
become larger or greater over a period of time; increase.
Guide
(n): someone who shows the way by leading or advising; a model or standard for making comparisons; something that offers basic information or instruction.
(v): be a guiding force, as with directions or advice; direct the course.
Guilty
responsible for an offence or misdeed
Habit
a settled or regular tendency or practice, especially one that is hard to give up.
"this can develop into a bad habit"
Habitual
done frequently and predictably
Halt
to stop, or make somebody or something stop
Handful
A small, undefined number or quantity
Handle
(v) 1. feel or manipulate with the hands. "heavy paving slabs can be difficult to handle"
2. manage (a situation or problem). "a lawyer's ability to handle a case properly"
(n) the part by which a thing is held, carried, or controlled. "the pan features helpful lifting handles"
Handy
(adj) 1. convenient to handle or use; useful.
"a handy desktop encyclopedia"
2. close at hand. "keep credit cards handy"
Hang around
1) to stay in a place. 2) to be with another person
Hang out
1. to suspend, be suspended, or lean
2. to live at or frequent a place: the police know where the thieves hang out.
3. (foll by: with) to frequent the company (of someone)
Happen
take place; occur.
"the afternoon when the disturbance happened"
Harass
to trouble, torment, or confuse by continual persistent attacks, questions, etc
Harm
(n) physical injury, especially that which is deliberately inflicted. "it's fine as long as no one is inflicting harm on anyone else"
(v) physically injure. "the villains didn't harm him"
Harvest
(n)n the process or period of gathering in crops. "helping with the harvest"
(v) gather (a crop) as a harvest. "after harvesting, most of the crop is stored in large buildings"
Has (her/his) sight set on/ Set sight on
to regard having someone or something as one's goal. "He wanted a wife and he had set his sights on Alice." "James set his sights on a law degree."
Hateful
arousing, deserving of, or filled with hatred.
"hateful letters of abuse that had come unsigned"
Have (day) off
...
Have no clue
Have no idea or inkling about something. "Jane doesn't have a clue as to why John won't call her" "Do you know what's wrong with the boiler?-No, I haven't a clue."
Hazard
a danger or risk. "the hazards of smoking"
Hazardous
risky; dangerous. "we work in hazardous conditions"
Headline
a heading at the top of an article or page in a newspaper or magazine. "a front-page headline"
Heckle
interrupt (a public speaker) with derisive or aggressive comments or abuse. "he was booed and heckled when he tried to address the demonstrators"
Hedge
a close-set row of bushes, usually with their branches intermingled, forming a barrier or boundary in a garden, lawn, or field
Heirloom
a valuable object that has belonged to a family for several generations.
Herb
any plant with leaves, seeds, or flowers used for flavoring, food, medicine, or perfume. "bundles of dried herbs"
Herd
a large group of animals, especially hoofed mammals, that live, feed, or migrate together or are kept together as livestock. "a herd of elephants"
Hereditary
passing, or capable of passing, naturally from parent to offspring through the genes
Hide
put or keep out of sight; conceal from the view or notice of others.
Hideous
extremely ugly; repulsive
Highbrow
Of, relating to, or being highly cultured or intellectual: They only attend highbrow events such as the ballet or the opera.
Hint
a slight or indirect indication or suggestion.
"he has given no hint of his views"
Hire
employ (someone) for wages.
"management hired and fired labor in line with demand"
Hit
(v) 1. bring one's hand or a tool or weapon into contact with (someone or something) quickly and forcefully. "the woman hit the mugger with her umbrella"
2. cause harm or distress to. "the area has been badly hit by business closures"
(n) 1. an instance of striking or being struck. "few structures can withstand a hit from a speeding car"
2. an instance of striking the target aimed at. "one of the bombers had scored a direct hit"
Hit It Off (with)
to quickly become good friends with someone. "Look how John hit it off with Mary. Yes, they really hit it off."
Hit the gym
...
Hitting wide of the mark/ be wide of the mark
1. to be wrong. "Yesterday's weather forecast was rather wide of the mark."
2. if you are wide of the mark when you aim or shoot at something, you miss what you are trying to hit. "Giggs had another chance early in the second half, but once again his shot was wide of the mark."
Hold
(v) 1. grasp, carry, or support with one's arms or hands. "she was holding a brown leather suitcase"
2. keep or detain (someone). "the police were holding him on a murder charge"
(n) an act or manner of grasping something; a grip. "he caught hold of her arm"
Hold hands
(of two or more people) clasp each other by the hand, typically as a sign of affection.
Honor
(n) 1. high respect; esteem. "his portrait hangs in the place of honor"
2. a privilege. "the great poet of whom it is my honor to speak tonight"
(v) 1. regard with great respect. "Joyce has now learned to honor her father's memory"
2. fulfill (an obligation) or keep (an agreement). "make sure the franchisees honor the terms of the contract"
Hope
(n) a feeling of expectation and desire for a certain thing to happen. "he looked through her belongings in the hope of coming across some information"
(v) want something to happen or be the case. "he's hoping for an offer of compensation"
Hopefully
in a hopeful manner. "he rode on hopefully"
Horde
a large group of people. "he was surrounded by a horde of tormenting relatives"
Horrible
causing or likely to cause horror; shocking. "a horrible massacre"
Host
(n): a person who receives or entertains other people as guests.
(v): act as host at (an event) or for (a television or radio program).
Hostility
intense aggression
Household
people of a house
How far
1. used to ask how great a distance is. "they wanted to know how far he could travel"
2. to what extent. "he was not sure how far she was committed"
How often
when you are asking about the number of times that something happens or happened.
Huffy
annoyed or irritated and quick to take offense at petty things. "ask writers for more than a second draft and they get huffy"
Humanity
1. the human race; human beings collectively. "appalling crimes against humanity"
2. humaneness; benevolence. "he praised them for their standards of humanity, care, and dignity"
Humble
Marked by meekness or modesty in behavior, attitude, or spirit; not arrogant or prideful.
Humiliate
make (someone) feel ashamed and foolish by injuring their dignity and self-respect, especially publicly. "you'll humiliate me in front of the whole school!"
Humiliation
the action of humiliating someone or the state of being humiliated. "they suffered the humiliation of losing in the opening round"
Humor
(n) 1. the quality of being amusing or comic, especially as expressed in literature or speech. "his tales are full of humor"
2. a mood or state of mind. "her good humor vanished"
(v) comply with the wishes of (someone) in order to keep them content, however unreasonable such wishes might be. "she was always humoring him to prevent trouble"
Hurt
(v) cause physical pain or injury to. "Ow! You're hurting me!"
(n) physical injury; harm.
Hype
(n) extravagant or intensive publicity or promotion.
"she relied on hype and headlines to stoke up interest in her music"
(v) promote or publicize (a product or idea) intensively, often exaggerating its importance or benefits. "an industry quick to hype its products"
Hypothesis
A supposition or proposed explanation made on the basis of limited evidence as a starting point for further investigation
I Beg To Differ
a polite way of saying that you disagree with something that someone has said
I will take my chances
...
Icon
a person or thing regarded as a representative symbol of something. "this iron-jawed icon of American manhood"
Iconic
1. of, relating to, or having the characteristics of an icon
2. widely recognized and well-established <an iconic brand name>
3. widely known and acknowledged especially for distinctive excellence <an iconic writer><a region's iconic wines>
I'd rather
...
Idea
...
Identify
establish or indicate who or what (someone or something) is.
Identity
the fact of being who or what a person or thing is.
If You Would
a polite phrase indicating assent to a suggestion
Ignite
1. catch fire or cause to catch fire. "furniture can give off lethal fumes when it ignites"
2. arouse or inflame (an emotion or situation). "the words ignited new fury in him"
Ignore
refuse to take notice of or acknowledge; disregard intentionally. "he ignored her outraged question"
Illustrate
1. provide (a book, newspaper, etc.) with pictures.
"the guide is illustrated with full-color photographs"
2. explain or make (something) clear by using examples, charts, pictures, etc. "the results are illustrated in Figure 7"
Imitate
to adopt somebody else's behavior, voice, or manner, sometimes in order to make fun of him or her
Imitation
1. a thing intended to simulate or copy something else. "an imitation diamond"
2. the action of using someone or something as a model. "a child learns to speak by imitation"
Immature
not fully developed.
"many of the fish caught are immature"
Immediate
occurring or done at once; instant. "the authorities took no immediate action"
Immediately
at once; instantly. "I called immediately for an ambulance"
Immerse
1. dip or submerge in a liquid. "immerse the paper in water for twenty minutes"
2. involve oneself deeply in a particular activity or interest. "she immersed herself in her work"
syn: absorb in
Immune
resistant to a particular infection or toxin owing to the presence of specific antibodies or sensitized white blood cells.
Immunity
The quality or condition of being immune
Impact
(n)1. the action of one object coming forcibly into contact with another. "there was the sound of a third impact"
2. the effect or influence of one person, thing, or action, on another. "our regional measures have had a significant impact on unemployment"
(v) 1. have a strong effect on someone or something.
"high interest rates have impacted on retail spending"
2. come into forcible contact with another object. "the shell impacted twenty yards away"
Impart
make (information) known; communicate.
"teachers had a duty to impart strong morals to their students"
Implement
(n) a tool, utensil, or other piece of equipment, especially as used for a particular purpose. "agricultural implements"
(v) put (a decision, plan, agreement, etc.) into effect.
"the regulations implement a 1954 treaty"
Imply
to indicate or suggest without being explicitly stated.
Impression
an idea, feeling, or opinion about something or someone, esp. one formed without conscious thought or on the basis of little evidence.
Impressive
evoking admiration through size, quality, or skill: grand, imposing, or awesome.
Improve
to make better
Improvement
a change for the better; progress in development
Improvise
1. create and perform (music, drama, or verse) spontaneously or without preparation. "the ability to improvise operatic arias in any given style"
2. produce or make (something) from whatever is available. "I improvised a costume for myself out of an old blue dress"
Impulse
1. a sudden strong and unreflective urge or desire to act. "I had an almost irresistible impulse to giggle"
synonyms: urge, instinct, drive
2. a driving or motivating force; an impetus. "an added impulse to this process of renewal"
synonyms: inspiration, stimulation
In charge
In a position of leadership or supervision
In charge Of
in control of someone or something; having the responsibility for someone or something
In contrast
...
In favor of
to the advantage of. "the final score was 25-16 in favor of Washington"
In return
(often followed by `for') in exchange or in reciprocation
In terms of
1. As measured or indicated by; in units of: distances expressed in terms of kilometers as well as miles; cheap entertainment, but costly in terms of time wasted.
2. In relation to; with reference to: ""facilities planned and programmed in terms of their interrelationships, instead of evolving haphazardly"" (Wharton Magazine).
In the process
as an unintended part of a course of action.
In Vain
without any useful result
Inadequate
insufficient, unsatisfactory
Inadvertent
accidental
Inappropriate
not suitable or proper in the circumstances.
"there are penalties for inappropriate behavior"
Incentive
encouragement
Incite
encourage or stir up (violent or unlawful behavior).
Include
1. comprise or contain as part of a whole. "the price includes dinner, bed, and breakfast"
2. make part of a whole or set. "we have included some hints for beginners in this section"
Inclusive
including much or everything; and especially including stated limits
Income
money received, especially on a regular basis, for work or through investments. "he has a nice home and an adequate income"
Incoming
in the process of coming in. "incoming passengers"
Incompatible With
unable to exist, cooperate, function, or get along with somebody or something else because of basic differences
Incompetent
not having or showing the necessary skills to do something successfully. "a forgetful and utterly incompetent assistant"
Incongruous
not in harmony or keeping with the surroundings or other aspects of something.
"the duffel coat looked incongruous with the black dress she wore underneath"
inconsiderate
thoughtlessly causing hurt or inconvenience to others.
"it's inconsiderate of her to go away without telling us"
Incorporate
(v) 1. take in or contain (something) as part of a whole; include. "he has incorporated in his proposals a number of measures"
2. constitute (a company, city, or other organization) as a legal corporation. "limited liability companies could only be incorporated under the 1930 Act"
Incredible
1. impossible to believe. "an almost incredible tale of triumph and tragedy"
2. difficult to believe; extraordinary. "the noise from the crowd was incredible"
Incredibly
to a great degree; extremely. "Michele was incredibly brave"
Indecent
1. not conforming with generally accepted standards of behaviour, especially in relation to sexual matters.
"indecent acts"
2. not appropriate or fitting. "they leaped on the suggestion with indecent haste"
Indecisive
1. not providing a clear and definite result.
"an indecisive battle"
2. (of a person) not able to make decisions quickly and effectively. "he was too indecisive to carry out his political programme"
Indelicate
having or showing a lack of sensitive understanding or tact. "forgive me asking an indelicate question, but how are you off for money?"
Indicate
1. point out; show. "dotted lines indicate the text's margins"
2. suggest as a desirable or necessary course of action.
"treatment for shock may be indicated"
Individual
(adj) 1. single; separate. "individual tiny flowers"
2. of or for a particular person. "the individual needs of the children"
(n) a single human being as distinct from a group. "boat trips for parties and individuals"
Induce
to persuade or influence somebody to do or think something
Industry
...
Inevitable
unavoidable
Inexpensive
...
Infamy
the state of being well known for some bad quality or deed. "a day that will live in infamy"
Infect
1. affect (a person, organism, etc.) with a disease-causing organism. "the chance that a child may have been infected with HIV"
2. contaminate (air, water, etc.) with harmful organisms. "the bacteria can get into a crop from an infected water supply"
Infection
the process of infecting or the state of being infected.
"strict hygiene will limit the risk of infection"
Inferior
(adj) lower in rank, status, or quality. "schooling in inner-city areas was inferior to that in the rest of the country"
(n) a person lower than another in rank, status, or ability. "her social and intellectual inferiors"
Influence
(n) the capacity to have an effect on the character, development, or behaviour of someone or something, or the effect itself. "the influence of television violence"
(v) have an influence on. "feminist ideas have influenced the law-makers"
Infringement
(n) 1. the action of breaking the terms of a law, agreement, etc.; violation. "copyright infringement"
2. the action of limiting or undermining something. "the infringement of the right to privacy"
Ingest
take (food, drink, or another substance) into the body by swallowing or absorbing it. "lead will poison anyone if enough is ingested"
Ingredient
(n) a component part or element of something. "the affair contains all the ingredients of an insoluble mystery"
Inherent
(adj) existing in something as a permanent, essential, or characteristic attribute. "any form of mountaineering has its inherent dangers"
Inherit
(v) 1. receive (money, property, or a title) as an heir at the death of the previous holder. "she inherited a fortune from her father"
2. derive (a quality, characteristic, or predisposition) genetically from one's parents or ancestors. "inherited diseases"
Inhibit
1. hinder, restrain, or prevent (an action or process).
"cold inhibits plant growth"
2. make (someone) self-conscious and unable to act in a relaxed and natural way. "they felt inhibited by the presence of healthcare professionals"
Initial
(adj) existing or occurring at the beginning. "our initial impression was favourable"
(v) mark or sign (a document) with one's initials in order to authorize or validate it. "the man initialled the three warrants"
Initially
at first. "initially, he thought the new concept was nonsense"
Injury
an instance of being injured. "she suffered an injury to her back"
Innocent
(adj)1. not guilty of a crime or offence. "the prisoners were later found innocent"
2. not responsible for or directly involved in an event yet suffering its consequences. "an innocent bystander"
(n) 1. a pure, guileless, or naive person. "a young innocent abroad"
2. a person involved by chance in a situation, especially a victim of crime or war. "they are prepared to kill or maim innocents in pursuit of a cause"
Innovation
something newly introduced, such as a new method or device
Innovative
- (of a product, idea, etc.) featuring new methods; advanced and original. "innovative designs"
- (of a person) introducing new ideas; original and creative in thinking. "writers who are now viewed as innovative"
Insane
x= sane
Insensitive
1. showing or feeling no concern for others' feelings.
"an insensitive remark"
2. not sensitive to a physical sensation.
"she was remarkably insensitive to pain"
Insert
place, fit, or push (something) into something else.
"Claudia inserted her key in the lock"
Insight
(n)1. the capacity to gain an accurate and deep understanding of someone or something. "his mind soared to previously unattainable heights of insight"
2. an accurate and deep understanding.
plural noun: insights "his work provides important insights into language use"
Capacity
1. the maximum amount that something can contain.
"the capacity of the freezer is 1.1 cubic feet"
2. the ability or power to do or understand something.
"I was impressed by her capacity for hard work"
Insist
1. demand something forcefully, not accepting refusal.
"she insisted on carrying her own bag"
2. demand forcefully to have (something). "he insisted on answers to his allegations"
3. persist in (doing something). "the heavy studded boots she insisted on wearing"
Inspire
fill (someone) with the urge or ability to do or feel something, especially to do something creative. "his philosophy inspired a later generation of environmentalists"
Install
1. place or fix (equipment or machinery) in position ready for use. "we're planning to install a new shower"
2. place (someone) in a new position of authority, especially with ceremony. "he was installed as Prime Minister in 1966"
Instance
An example that is cited to prove or invalidate a contention or illustrate a point
Instant
(adj) happening or coming immediately. "the offence justified instant dismissal"
(n) 1. happening or coming immediately. "the offence justified instant dismissal"
2. a precise moment of time. "come here this instant!"
Instantly
at once; immediately. "she fell asleep almost instantly"
Instead
as an alternative or substitute.
Instinctive
having a particular quality or skill spontaneously and without effort or instruction
Instruction
1. a direction or order. "he issued instructions to the sheriff"
2. detailed information about how something should be done or operated. "always study the instructions supplied"
Insult
(v) speak to or treat with disrespect or scornful abuse.
"you're insulting the woman I love"
(n) a disrespectful or scornfully abusive remark or act.
"he hurled insults at us"
Insurgency
an organized rebellion aimed at overthrowing a constituted government through the use of subversion and armed conflict
Insurgent
A rebel or revolutionary
Intact
not damaged or impaired in any way; complete. "the church was almost in ruins but its tower remained intact"
Integrate
1. combine (one thing) with another to form a whole.
"transport planning should be integrated with energy policy"
2. bring (people or groups with particular characteristics or needs) into equal participation in or membership of a social group or institution. "integrating children with special needs into ordinary schools"
Integrity
1. the quality of being honest and having strong moral principles. "a gentleman of complete integrity"
synonyms: honesty
2. the state of being whole and undivided. "upholding territorial integrity and national sovereignty"
synonyms: unity
Intellect
1. the faculty of reasoning and understanding objectively, especially with regard to abstract matters.
"he was a man of action rather than of intellect"
2. a person's mental powers. plural noun: intellects
"her keen intellect"
Intellectual
(adj) relating to the intellect. "children need intellectual stimulation"
(n) a person possessing a highly developed intellect.
"a prominent political thinker and intellectual"
Intend
1- have (a course of action) as one's purpose or objective; plan.
2- design or destine (someone or something) for a particular purpose or end.
Intense
of extreme force, degree, or strength
Intensive
(adj) concentrated on a single subject or into a short time; very thorough or vigorous. "she undertook an intensive Arabic course"
synonyms: thorough, in-depth
Intent
(n) intention or purpose. "with alarm she realized his intent" synonyms: aim
(adj) determined to do (something). "the government was intent on achieving greater efficiency"
Intention
a thing intended; an aim or plan. "she was full of good intentions"
synonyms: aim, purpose, intent, objective
Interact
- act in such a way as to have an effect on each other. "all the stages in the process interact"
- communicate or be involved directly. "the user interacts directly with the library"
Interaction
reciprocal action or influence. "ongoing interaction between the two languages"
Interfere
1- prevent (a process or activity) from continuing or being carried out properly.
2- take part or intervene in an activity without invitation or necessity. "she tried not to interfere in her children's lives""
Interference
the action of interfering or the process of being interfered with. "concerns about government interference in church life"
synonyms: intrusion
Interior
(adj) 1. situated on or relating to the inside of something; inner. "the interior lighting is not adequate"
2. remote from the coast or frontier; inland.
"the interior jungle regions"
(n) 1. the inner part of something; the inside. "the interior has been much restored"
2. the inland part of a country or region. "the plains of the interior"
Interminable
endless or apparently endless (often used hyperbolically). "we got bogged down in interminable discussions"
synonyms: seemingly endless
Interpret
1. explain the meaning of (information or actions). "the evidence is difficult to interpret"
synonyms: explain
2. translate orally or into sign language the words of a person speaking a different language. "I agreed to interpret for Jean-Claude"
synonyms: translate, transcribe, transliterate, rewrite, convert; paraphrase
Interpretation
the action of explaining the meaning of something.
"the interpretation of data"
Interrogate
ask questions of (someone, esp. a suspect or a prisoner) closely, aggressively, or formally.
Interrupt
to disturb somebody who is busy doing something, causing him or her to stop
Intimidate
frighten or overawe (someone), esp. in order to make them do what one wants.
Intricate
containing many details or small parts that are combined in a particularly complex or skillful way
Intrigued (About)
Arouse the curiosity or interest of; fascinate
Introduce
1. bring (something, especially a product, measure, or concept) into use or operation for the first time. "various new taxes were introduced"
2. make (someone) known by name to another in person, especially formally. "I must introduce you to my wife"
Intuition
the ability to understand something instinctively, without the need for conscious reasoning.
"we shall allow our intuition to guide us"
Intuitive
using or based on what one feels to be true even without conscious reasoning; instinctive. "his intuitive understanding of the readers' real needs"
Investigate
To observe or inquire into in detail; examine systematically.
Invite
make a polite, formal, or friendly request to (someone) to go somewhere or to do something. "we were invited to a dinner at the Embassy"
Invoke
1. call on (a deity or spirit) in prayer, as a witness, or for inspiration. synonyms: pray to
2. cite or appeal to (someone or something) as an authority for an action or in support of an argument. "the antiquated defence of insanity is rarely invoked in England"
Involved
connected or concerned with someone or something, typically on an emotional or personal level.
Irrelevant
not connected with or relevant to something.
Irritate
1. make (someone) annoyed or a little angry. "his tone irritated her"
2. cause inflammation or other discomfort in (a part of the body). "sprays and polishes can irritate dry, sensitive skin"
Irritating
causing annoyance, impatience, or mild anger.
Irritation
a painful reaction, especially an inflammation, caused by an irritant. Annoyance
be/have yet to
to have not yet (done something)
"we have yet to win"
Isolate
cause (a person or place) to be or remain alone or apart from others.
Issue
(n) 1. an important topic or problem for debate or discussion. "the issue of racism"
2. the action of supplying or distributing an item for use, sale, or official purposes. "the issue of notes by the Bank of England"
(v) 1. supply or distribute (something) for use or sale. "licences were issued indiscriminately to any company"
2. result or be derived from. "the struggles of history issue from the divided heart of humanity"
Item
an individual article or unit, esp. one that is part of a list, collection, or set.
It's about time
It is almost too late!; I've been waiting a long time! (Said with impatience.) "So you finally got here! It's about time!" "They finally paid me my money. It's about time!"
It's Gone
Dying or dead, lost, ended, past.
no longer present; departed.
Jail
(n) a place for the confinement of people accused or convicted of a crime. "he spent 15 years in jail"
(v) put (someone) in jail. "the driver was jailed for two years"
synonyms: imprison
Jar
a wide-mouthed cylindrical container made of glass or pottery, especially one used for storing food.
"a large storage jar"
Jeopardize
put (someone or something) into a situation in which there is a danger of loss, harm, or failure. "a devaluation of the dollar would jeopardize New York's position as a financial centre"
synonyms: threaten, endanger
Jeopardy
danger of loss, harm, or failure. "the whole peace process is in jeopardy"
synonyms: danger
Jerk
1. move or cause to move with a jerk. "the van jerked forward"
2. cure (meat) by cutting it into strips and drying it (originally in the sun).
3. a quick, sharp pull, thrust, twist, throw, or the like; a sudden movement. "The train started with a jerk."
4. any sudden, quick movement of the body, as in dodging something.
Join
(v) link; connect. "the tap was joined to a pipe"
(n) a place or line where two or more things are connected or fastened together.
"it was soldered so well that you couldn't see the join"
joint
(n) 1. a point at which parts of an artificial structure are joined. "seal the joint between the roof and the house wall" synonyms: join, junction
2. a structure in the human or animal body at which two parts of the skeleton are fitted together. "she suffers from stiff joints and finds bending difficult"
(adj) shared, held, or made by two or more people together. "a joint statement"
synonyms: common, shared
(v) provide or fasten (something) with joints. "jointed lever arms"
Journalist
a person who writes for newspapers or magazines or prepares news to be broadcast on radio or television.
"foreign journalists had been expelled from the area"
synonyms: reporter, correspondent
Joy
a feeling of great pleasure and happiness. "tears of joy" synonyms: delight, great pleasure
Justification
the action of showing something to be right or reasonable. "the justification of revolutionary action"
Justified
having an acceptable reason for the action taken
Juvenile
(adj) 1. for or relating to young people. "juvenile crime"
2. childish; immature. "she's bored with my juvenile conversation" synonyms: childish, immature
Keen eye for details
pay great attention to "Susan has a keen eye for detail, so each dress is beautifully finished."
Keen On
to be enthusiastic about someone or something
Keep
(v) 1. have or retain possession of. "my father would keep the best for himself"
2. continue or cause to continue in a specified condition, position, course, etc. "she could have had some boyfriend she kept quiet about"
(n) food, clothes, and other essentials for living.
"working overtime to earn his keep"
Keep up
1. To maintain in good condition: kept up the property.
2. To persevere in; carry on: We asked her to stop talking, but she kept it up.
3. To preserve or sustain: kept up the appearance of friendship.
4. To continue at the same level or pace: The snow kept up all day.
Key (something)
of paramount or crucial importance. "she became a key figure in the suffragette movement"
synonyms: crucial, central, essential
Kick
strike or propel forcibly with the foot. "police kicked down the door"
Knuckles
a part of a finger at a joint where the bone is near the surface, especially where the finger joins the hand. "Charlotte rapped on the window with her knuckles"
Labor
1. work, especially hard physical work. "the price of repairs includes labor and parts"
2. the process of childbirth, especially the period from the start of uterine contractions to delivery.
"his wife is in labor"
Last
(v) 1. (of a process, activity, or state of things) continue for a specified period of time. "the guitar solo lasted for twenty minutes"
2. continue to function well or to be in good condition for a considerable or specified length of time. "the car is built to last"
(adj) 1. coming after all others in time or order; final.
"they caught the last bus"
2. most recent in time; latest.
"last year"
(adv) 1. on the last occasion before the present; previously. "he looked much older than when I'd last seen him"
2. after all others in order or sequence. "the two last-mentioned classes"
Lately
recently; not long ago.
"she hasn't been looking too well lately"
Later
...
Launch
(v)1. To throw or propel with force; hurl: launch a spear.
2. To set or thrust (a self-propelled craft or projectile) in motion: launch a rocket; launch a torpedo.
3. To set going; initiate: launch a career; launch a business venture.
4. To begin a new venture or phase; embark: launch forth on a dangerous mission; launched out on her own after college.
(n) an act or an instance of launching something.
"the launch of a new campaign against drinking and driving"
Lawful
conforming to, permitted by, or recognized by law or rules. "it is an offense to carry a weapon in public without lawful authority"
synonyms: legitimate, legal
Lay
(v) 1. put down, especially gently or carefully. "she laid the baby in his crib"
2. put down and set in position for use.
"it is advisable to have your carpet laid by a professional"
(n) the general appearance of an area, including the direction of streams, hills, and similar features.
"the lay of the surrounding countryside"
Lay low
1. To keep oneself or one's plans hidden.
2. To bide one's time but remain ready for action.
Lead
(v) 1. To show the way to by going in advance: The host led us to our table. See Synonyms at guide.
2. To guide or direct in a course: lead a horse by the halter.
3. be in charge or command of. "a military delegation was led by the Chief of Staff"
(n) 1. the initiative in an action; an example for others to follow. "The US is now taking the environmental lead"
2. a position of advantage in a contest; first place. "they were beaten 5-3 after twice being in the lead"
Leak
accidentally lose or admit contents, esp. liquid or gas, through a hole or crack. (of secret information) become known.
Leave
(n): permission to do something; the period of time during which you are absent from work or duty.
(v): go away from a place.
Leftover
Something, esp. food, remaining after the rest has been used or consumed
Legacy
an amount of money or property left to someone in a will.
Legal
1. of, based on, or concerned with the law.
"the American legal system"
2. permitted by law. "he claimed that it had all been legal"
synonyms: lawful, legitimate
Legislation
laws, considered collectively. "tax legislation"
Legit
1. legal; conforming to the rules. "is this car legit?"
2. (of a person) not engaging in illegal activity or attempting to deceive; honest. "to see if he's legit, I call up the business"
Legitimacy
the state of being legitimate.
Legitimate
conforming to the law or to rules. "his claims to legitimate authority"
Leverage
(n) 1. Positional advantage; power to act effectively: "started his career with far more social leverage than his father had enjoyed"
2. the exertion of force by means of a lever or an object used in the manner of a lever. "my spade hit something solid that wouldn't respond to leverage"
(v) use (something) to maximum advantage. "the organization needs to leverage its key resources"
Levity
humor or frivolity, especially the treatment of a serious matter with humor or in a manner lacking due respect. "as an attempt to introduce a note of levity, the words were a disastrous flop"
Liability
(n) 1. the state of being responsible for something, especially by law. "the partners accept unlimited liability for any risks they undertake"
synonyms: accountability, responsibility
2. a person or thing whose presence or behavior is likely to cause embarrassment or put one at a disadvantage. "he has become a political liability"
Liable
(adj) 1. responsible by law; legally answerable.
"the supplier of goods or services can become liable for breach of contract in a variety of ways"
2. likely to do or to be something. "patients were liable to faint if they stood up too suddenly"
synonyms: likely
Lid
a removable or hinged cover for the top of a container. "a large frying pan with a lid"
Lie
(n) an intentionally false statement. "Mungo felt a pang of shame at telling Alice a lie"
(v) 1. tell a lie or lies. "why had Wesley lied about his visit to Philadelphia?"
2. (of a person or animal) be in or assume a horizontal or resting position on a supporting surface. "the man lay face downward on the grass"
3. (of a place) be situated in a specified position or direction. "the small town of Swampscott lies about ten miles north of Boston"
Lighten the mood
To make less worried or more cheerful
Lighten up
1. make more cheerful; "the conversation lightened me up a bit"
2. become lighter; "The room lightened up"
Likelihood
the state or fact of something's being likely; probability. "young people who can see no likelihood of finding employment"
Limited
restricted in size, amount, or extent; few, small, or short. "a limited number of places are available"
Link
(n) a relationship between two things or situations, especially where one thing affects the other. "investigating a link between pollution and forest decline"
(v) make, form, or suggest a connection with or between. "rumors that linked his name with Judith"
synonyms: associate, connect, relate, join
List
(v) make a list of. "I have listed four reasons below"
(n)a number of connected items or names written or printed consecutively, typically one below the other. "consult the list of drugs on page 326"
Livestock
Domestic animals, such as cattle or horses, raised for home use or for profit, especially on a farm.
Lock
(v)1. fasten or secure (something) with a lock.
2. make or become rigidly fixed or immovable. "he locked his hands behind her neck"
Long-term
occurring over or relating to a long period of time. "the long-term unemployed"
Look after
take care of.
Look forward to
await eagerly. "we look forward to seeing you"
Overlook
(v) 1. fail to notice (something). "he seems to have overlooked one important fact"
2. have a view of from above. "the chateau overlooks fields of corn and olive trees"
(n) a commanding position or view. "he veered off the highway onto an overlook"
Past
(adj) gone by in time and no longer existing.
"the danger is now past"
(n) the time or a period of time before the moment of speaking or writing. "she found it hard to make ends meet in the past"
(adv) 1. on or onwards: I greeted him but he just walked past.
2. so as to pass from one side of something to the other. "large angelfish swim slowly past"
(prep) 1. Beyond in time; later than or after: past midnight; a quarter past two.
2. Beyond in position; farther than: The house is a mile past the first stoplight. They walked past the memorial in silence.
3. a. Beyond the power, scope, extent, or influence of: The problem is past the point of resolution.
Look Up To Someone
respect and admire
Loose
(adj) 1. not firmly or tightly fixed in place; detached or able to be detached. "a loose tooth"
2. (of a garment) not fitting tightly or closely. "she slipped into a loose T-shirt and shorts"
Loosen up
1. warm up in preparation for an activity.
"arrive early to loosen up and hit some practice shots"
2. make or become relaxed. "they taught me to have fun at work and loosen up"
Lose
1. be deprived of or cease to have or retain (something). "I've lost my appetite"
2. become unable to find (something or someone).
"I've lost the car keys"
deprive
deny (a person or place) the possession or use of something. "the city was deprived of its water supplies"
Lose Yourself In Something
to stop worrying about yourself by giving attention to something else
Lost in thought
not aware of what is happening around you because you are thinking about something else
Loud
producing or capable of producing much noise; easily audible. "they were kept awake by loud music"
Loyal
giving or showing firm and constant support or allegiance to a person or institution. "he remained loyal to the government"
synonyms: faithful, true, devoted
Lure away
to entice or draw someone away from someone or something. "Do you think we could lure her away from her present employment?"
"They were not able to lure away many of the employees of the other companies."
Magnificent
1. impressively beautiful, elaborate, or extravagant; striking. "a dramatic landscape of magnificent mountains" synonyms: splendid, spectacular, impressive
2. very good; excellent. "she paid tribute to their magnificent efforts"
Maintain
1. cause or enable (a condition or state of affairs) to continue. "the need to maintain close links between industry and schools" synonyms: preserve, conserve, keep, retain
2. provide with necessities for life or existence. "the allowance covers the basic costs of maintaining a child" synonyms: support, provide for, keep, sustain
Make a decision (or choice)
...
Make sure
establish that something is definitely so; confirm. "go and make sure she's all right" synonyms: check, confirm, make certain, ensure, assure
make up (for)
1. serve or act to compensate for something lost, missed, or deficient. "I'll make up the time tomorrow"
2. to take the place of something that has been lost or damaged "Nothing can make up for the loss of a child."
3. to provide something good, so that something bad seems less important. "The good weather made up for the bad organization." "He bought her some flowers to make up for being late."
Malicious
characterized by malice; intending or intended to do harm. "malicious destruction of property"
Manage
1. be in charge of (a company, establishment, or undertaking); administer; run. "their elder son managed the farm" synonyms: be in charge of, run
2. succeed in surviving or in attaining one's aims, especially against heavy odds. "Catherine managed on five hours' sleep a night" synonyms: cope
Manage to (do something)
to succeed in being able (to do something) despite obstacles; contrive: did you manage to go to sleep?.
Mandatory
Required by law or rules
Maneuver
(n) 1. a movement or series of moves requiring skill and care. "spectacular jumps and other daring maneuvers"
2. a large-scale military exercise of troops, warships, and other forces. "the Russian vessel was on maneuvers"
(v) 1. move skillfully or carefully. "the truck was unable to maneuver comfortably in the narrow street"
2. carefully guide or manipulate (someone or something) in order to achieve an end. "they were maneuvering him into a betrayal of his countryman"
Manipulate
control or influence (a person or situation) cleverly, unfairly, or unscrupulously. "the masses were deceived and manipulated by a tiny group"
Manipulation
​controlling someone or something to ​your own ​advantage, often ​unfairly or ​dishonestly: "They have been ​accused of ​fraud and ​stock ​market manipulations." "There's been so much ​media manipulation of the ​facts that nobody ​knows the ​truth of the ​matter." "The country's ​opposition ​party ​claims the ​president ​returned to ​power through ​political manipulation."
Manner
1. a way of doing, being done, or happening; mode of action, occurrence, etc.: I don't like the manner in which he complained.
2. a person's outward bearing; way of speaking to and treating others: She has a charming manner.
3. characteristic or customary way of doing, making, saying, etc.: houses built in the 19th-century manner.
Manufacture
(n) the making of articles on a large scale using machinery. "the manufacture of armored vehicles"
(v) make (something) on a large scale using machinery. "a company that manufactured paint-by-number sets" synonyms: make, produce
Margin
(n) 1. the edge or border of something. "the eastern margin of the Indian Ocean"
2. an amount by which a thing is won or falls short. "they won by a convincing 17-point margin"
(v) provide with an edge or border. "its leaves are margined with yellow"
Mark
(n) 1. a small area on a surface having a different color from its surroundings, typically one caused by accident or damage. "the blow left a red mark down one side of her face"
2. a line, figure, or symbol made as an indication or record of something.
(v) 1. make (a visible impression or stain) on. "he fingered the photograph gently, careful not to mark it"
2. write a word or symbol on (an object), typically for identification. "she marked all her possessions with her name"
Massive
large and heavy or solid.
masterpiece
a work of outstanding artistry, skill, or workmanship.
"a great literary masterpiece"
Match
(n)1. a contest in which people or teams compete against each other in a particular sport. "a boxing match" synonyms: contest, competition
2. a person or thing able to contend with another as an equal in quality or strength. "they were no match for the trained mercenaries"
(v) 1. correspond or cause to correspond in some essential respect; make or be harmonious. "we bought green and blue curtains to match the bedspread" synonyms: go with, coordinate with, complement
2. be equal to (something) in quality or strength.
"his anger matched her own"
Mature
(n) fully developed physically; full-grown. "she was now a mature woman" synonyms: adult, grown-up
(v) (of an organism) become physically mature. "children mature at different ages" synonyms: be fully grown
Meaningful
1. having meaning. "meaningful elements in a language" synonyms: significant, relevant
2. having a serious, important, or useful quality or purpose. "making our lives rich and meaningful"
Meaningless
having no meaning or significance. "the paragraph was a jumble of meaningless words"
MED - General practitioner (GP)
a medical doctor who is trained to provide primary health care to patients of either sex and any age.
MED - Medication
1. a substance used for medical treatment, especially a medicine or drug. "he'd been taking medication for depression"
2. treatment using drugs. "chronic gastrointestinal symptoms which may require prolonged medication"
MED - physical therapist
highly-educated, licensed health care professionals who can help patients reduce pain and improve or restore mobility - in many cases without expensive surgery and often reducing the need for long-term use of prescription medications and their side effects.
MED - podiatrist
a doctor of podiatric medicine (DPM), also known as a podiatric physician or surgeon. Podiatrists diagnose and treat conditions of the foot, ankle, and related structures of the leg.
MED - Specialist
A physician whose practice is limited to a particular branch of medicine or surgery, especially one who is certified by a board of physicians
Member
1. an individual, thing, or organization belonging to a group. "a member of the drama club"
2. a constituent piece of a complex structure. "the main member that joins the front and rear axles"
synonyms: element, component, part, portion, piece, unit
Memorize
commit to memory; learn by heart.
"he memorized thousands of verses"
Memory
1. the faculty by which the mind stores and remembers information. "I've a great memory for faces"
2. something remembered from the past; a recollection. "one of my earliest memories is of sitting on his knee"
Mental
1. of or relating to the mind. "mental faculties"
2. of or relating to disorders of the mind. "a mental hospital"
Mentality
the characteristic attitude of mind or way of thinking of a person or group. "the yuppie mentality of the eighties" synonyms: way of thinking, mind set
Mention
(v) refer to something briefly and without going into detail. "I haven't mentioned it to William yet"
(n) a reference to someone or something. "their eyes light up at a mention of Sartre"
Mere
- just what is specified and nothing more, usually emphasizing the smallness, humbleness, or unimportance of the thing or person designated
- that is solely or no more or better than what is specified. "it happened a mere decade ago"
- the smallest or slightest. "the merest hint of makeup"
Merely
just; only. "she seemed to him not merely an intelligent woman, but a kind of soul mate"
synonyms: only, purely, solely, simply, just
Merge
combine or cause to combine to form a single entity.
"the utility companies are cutting costs and merging with other companies" synonyms: join (together)
Merit
(n) 1. the quality of being particularly good or worthy, especially so as to deserve praise or reward. "composers of outstanding merit" synonyms: excellence, quality
2. (Merits of Something) a feature or fact that deserves praise or reward. "the relative merits of both approaches have to be considered" synonyms: good point, strong point, advantage
(v) deserve or be worthy of (something, especially reward, punishment, or attention). "the results have been encouraging enough to merit further investigation" synonyms: deserve, earn
Mess
(n) 1. a dirty or untidy state of things or of a place. she made a mess of the kitchen"
2. a situation or state of affairs that is confused or full of difficulties. "the economy is still in a terrible mess"
(v): make untidy or dirty. "you've messed up my beautiful carpet"
Mess - Mess around
1- to busy oneself aimlessly; waste time.
2- to have sexual affairs; philander.
Mess - Mess up
1. to perform poorly; produce errors or confusion.
2. to treat roughly; beat up.
Mess - Messed up
in disorder; intoxicated, drunk; awful, horrible; damaged
Messy
1. untidy or dirty. "his messy hair"
2. (of a situation) confused and difficult to deal with. "a messy divorce"
Meteor
the visible streak of light from a meteoroid or micrometeoroid, heated and glowing from entering the Earth's atmosphere
Method
a particular form of procedure for accomplishing or approaching something, especially a systematic or established one. "a method for software maintenance" synonyms: procedure, technique, system, practice, routine
Migraine
a recurrent throbbing headache that typically affects one side of the head and is often accompanied by nausea and disturbed vision.
Mild
- gentle and not easily provoked. "she was implacable, despite her mild exterior"
synonyms: gentle, tender
- (of a rule or punishment) of only moderate severity. "he received a mild sentence"
Mischief
(n) 1. playful misbehavior or troublemaking, especially in children. "she'll make sure Danny doesn't get into mischief" synonyms: naughtiness, bad behavior
2. "dated" a person responsible for harm or annoyance.
Misconception
A view or opinion that is incorrect because it is based on faulty thinking or understanding
Misery
intense unhappiness, discomfort, or suffering; wretchedness
Misfortune
(n) bad luck. "the project was dogged by misfortune"
Misleading
Tending to mislead; deceptive
Miss
(v) 1. fail to hit, reach, or come into contact with (something aimed at). "a laser-guided bomb had missed its target"
2. notice the loss or absence of. "he's rich—he won't miss the money"
(n) a failure to hit, catch, or reach something. "Elster's stunning catch in the third inning made up for his dreadful miss in the first"
Mix
(v) 1. combine or put together to form one substance or mass. "peppercorns are sometimes mixed with other spices for a table condiment" synonyms: blend
2. (of a person) associate with others socially. "the people he mixed with were nothing to do with show business" synonyms: associate, socialize
(n) two or more different qualities, things, or people placed, combined, or considered together. "the decor is a mix of antique and modern" synonyms: mixture, blend
Moan
(n) a long, low sound made by a person expressing physical or mental suffering or sexual pleasure. "she gave a low moan of despair"
(v) make a long, low sound expressing physical or mental suffering or sexual pleasure. "just then their patient moaned and opened his eyes"
Moderate
(adj) average in amount, intensity, quality, or degree. "we walked at a moderate pace" synonyms: average, modest
(n) a person who holds moderate views, especially in politics.
(v) make or become less extreme, intense, rigorous, or violent. "I shall not moderate my criticism"
Modest
(adj)1. having or showing a moderate or humble estimate of one's merits, importance, etc.; free from vanity, egotism, boastfulness, or great pretensions. "he was a very modest man, refusing to take any credit for the enterprise" synonyms: humble
2. (of an amount, rate, or level of something) relatively moderate, limited, or small. "drink modest amounts of alcohol" synonyms: moderate, fair, limited
Modesty
(n) 1. the quality of not being too proud or confident about yourself or your abilities.
2. the quality of behaving and especially dressing in ways that do not attract sexual attention.
"She accepted the award with modesty."
"He is known for his modesty, an uncommon characteristic for a politician."
Monetize
- convert into or express in the form of currency.
- to utilize (something of value) as a source of profit.
Monitor
(n) an instrument or device used for observing, checking, or keeping a continuous record of a process or quantity. "a heart monitor"
(v) observe and check the progress or quality of (something) over a period of time; keep under systematic review. "equipment was installed to monitor air quality" synonyms: observe, watch, track
Moral
(adj) 1. concerned with the principles of right and wrong behavior and the goodness or badness of human character. "the moral dimensions of medical intervention"
2. holding or manifesting high principles for proper conduct. "he prides himself on being a highly moral and ethical person"
(n)1. a lesson, especially one concerning what is right or prudent, that can be derived from a story, a piece of information, or an experience. "the moral of this story was that one must see the beauty in what one has" synonyms: lesson, message
2. a person's standards of behavior or beliefs concerning what is and is not acceptable for them to do. "the corruption of public morals"
synonyms: moral code, code of ethics, values, principles, standards
Morale
the confidence, enthusiasm, and discipline of a person or group at a particular time. "their morale was high" synonyms: confidence, self-confidence, self-esteem, spirit(s), team spirit, enthusiasm
Mortgage
(n) the charging of real (or personal) property by a debtor to a creditor as security for a debt (especially one incurred by the purchase of the property), on the condition that it shall be returned on payment of the debt within a certain period.
(v)1. convey (a property) to a creditor as security on a loan. "the estate was mortgaged up to the hilt"
2. expose to future risk or constraint for the sake of immediate advantage. "some people worry that selling off federal assets mortgages the country's future"
Motion
(n)1. the action or process of moving or being moved. "the laws of planetary motion" synonyms: movement
2. a formal proposal put to a legislature or committee. "the head of our commission made a motion that we rewrite the constitution" synonyms: proposal, proposition
(v) direct or command (someone) with a movement of the hand or head. "he motioned Dennis to a plush chair" synonyms: gesture, signal, direct, indicate
Movement
1. an act of changing physical location or position or of having this changed. "a slight movement of the upper body" synonyms: motion, move
2. a group of people working together to advance their shared political, social, or artistic ideas. "the labor movement" synonyms: political group, party
Advance
(v) 1. move forward, typically in a purposeful way.
"the troops advanced on the capital" synonyms: move forward, proceed
(n) 1. a forward movement. "the rebels' advance on Madrid was well under way" synonyms: progress, forward movement; approach
2. an amount of money paid before it is due or for work only partly completed. "the author was paid a $250,000 advance" synonyms: down payment
(adj) done, sent, or supplied beforehand. "advance notice" synonyms: preliminary
Advanced
1. far on or ahead in development or progress.
"negotiations are at an advanced stage" synonyms: state-of-the-art, new, modern, developed, cutting-edge
2. new and not yet generally accepted. "his advanced views made him unpopular"
Cutting-edge
(adj) at the latest or most advanced stage of development; innovative or pioneering. "cutting-edge technology"
(n) 1. the edge of a tool's blade.
2. the latest or most advanced stage in the development of something. "researchers at the cutting edge of molecular biology"
Move
(v) 1. go in a specified direction or manner; change position. "she stood up and moved to the door" synonyms: go, walk, proceed, progress, advance
2. change or cause to change from one state, opinion, sphere, or activity to another. "the school moved over to the new course in 1987"
(n) 1. an action that initiates or advances a process or plan. "my next move is to talk to Matthew"
2. a change of place, position, or state. "she made a sudden move toward me"
Move on
1. to leave one place and travel to another. "They stayed for only a few days before moving on."
2. to stop discussing or doing something and begin discussing or doing something different ,move on to: "Let's move on to the next question."
3. to start to continue with your life after you have dealt successfully with a bad experience. "It's been a nightmare, but now I just want to forget about it and move on."
Moving
(adj) 1. in motion. "a fast-moving river" synonyms: in motion, operating
2. producing strong emotion, especially sadness or sympathy. "an unforgettable and moving book" synonyms: affecting, touching
Mug (v)
attack and rob (someone) in a public place. "he was mugged by three men who stole his bike"
Multi
more than one; many, especially variegated. "multicolor"
Mumble
speak in a low voice
Murder
(n) the unlawful premeditated killing of one human being by another. "the stabbing murder of an off-Broadway producer" synonyms: killing, homicide, assassination
(v) kill (someone) unlawfully and with premeditation.
"somebody tried to murder Joe" synonyms: kill, put to death, assassinate, execute
Mutate
- change or cause to change in form or nature.
"technology continues to mutate at an alarming rate"
synonyms: change
-biology : to cause (a gene) to change and create an unusual characteristic in a plant or animal : to cause mutation in (a gene)
- to change and cause an unusual characteristic to develop in a plant or animal
- to change into something very different
Mutual
(adj)1. (of a feeling or action) experienced or done by each of two or more parties toward the other or others. "a partnership based on mutual respect and understanding"
2. held in common by two or more parties. "we were introduced by a mutual friend"
Mysterious
difficult or impossible to understand, explain, or identify. "his colleague had vanished in mysterious circumstances" synonyms: puzzling
Mystery
1. something that is difficult or impossible to understand or explain. "the mysteries of outer space" synonyms: puzzle, enigma
2. a novel, play, or movie dealing with a puzzling crime, especially a murder.
Nag
1. annoy or irritate (a person) with persistent fault-finding or continuous urging. "she constantly nags her daughter about getting married"
Nail
(n) 1. a small metal spike with a broadened flat head, driven typically into wood with a hammer to join things together or to serve as a peg or hook.
2. a horny covering on the upper surface of the tip of the finger and toe in humans and other primates.
(v) fasten to a surface or to something else with a nail or nails. "nail the edge framing to the wall"
synonyms: fasten
Name after
Give someone or something the name of another person or place. For example, They named the baby after his grandfather, or The mountain was named for President McKinley
Name
(n)1. a word or set of words by which a person, animal, place, or thing is known, addressed, or referred to.
2. a famous person. "as usual, the big race will lure the top names"
(v) 1. give a name to. "hundreds of diseases had not yet been isolated or named"
2. specify (an amount, time, or place) as something desired, suggested, or decided on. "he showed them the picture and named a price" synonyms: choose, select, pick, decide on, nominate, designate
Designate
appoint (someone) to a specified position. "he was designated as prime minister"
Nap
(n&v) sleep lightly or briefly, especially during the day.
Narrow
(adj) 1. (especially of something that is considerably longer or higher than it is wide) of small width. "he made his way down the narrow road"
2. limited in extent, amount, or scope; restricted.
"his ability to get good results within narrow constraints of money and manpower"
(v) 1. become or make less wide. "the road narrowed and crossed an old bridge"
2. become or make more limited or restricted in extent or scope. "their trade surplus narrowed to $70 million in January"
Nationwide
extending or reaching throughout the whole nation.
"a nationwide hunt"
Natural
existing in or caused by nature; not made or caused by humankind.
Near
(adv) 1. at or to a short distance away; nearby. "a bomb exploding somewhere near"
2. a short time away in the future. "the time for his retirement was drawing near"
(adj) 1. located a short distance away. "a big house in the near distance"
2. only a short time ahead. "the conflict is unlikely to be resolved in the near future"
(prep) at or to a short distance away from (a place). "the parking lot near the sawmill" synonyms: close to, close by
Nearly
1. very close to; almost. "David was nearly asleep" synonyms: almost, just about, about
2. closely. "in the absence of anyone more nearly related, I had been designated next of kin"
Neat
orderly and in a clean condition
Nebulous
not developed or clear enough to describe
Necessary
1- required to be done, achieved, or present; needed; essential.
2- determined, existing, or happening by natural laws or predestination; inevitable.
Necessity
1. the fact of being required or indispensable.
"the necessity of providing parental guidance should be apparent" synonyms: essential
2. an indispensable thing. "a good book is a necessity when traveling"
Need
(v) require (something) because it is essential or very important. "I need help now"
(n) 1. circumstances in which something is necessary, or that require some course of action; necessity. "the basic human need for food" synonyms: necessity, obligation
2. a thing that is wanted or required. "his day-to-day needs"
Negative
(adj) 1. consisting in or characterized by the absence rather than the presence of distinguishing features.
2. (of a person, attitude, or situation) not desirable or optimistic. "the new tax was having a very negative effect on car sales" synonyms: pessimistic
Meet
(v) 1. come into the presence or company of (someone) by chance or arrangement. "a week later I met him in the street" synonyms: encounter
2. fulfill or satisfy (a need, requirement, or condition). "this policy is doing nothing to meet the needs of women" synonyms: fulfill, satisfy, fill
Conform
- comply with rules, standards, or laws. "the kitchen does not conform to hygiene regulations" synonyms: comply with, abide by, obey
- be similar in form or type; agree. "the countryside should conform to a certain idea of the picturesque" synonyms: match, fit, suit, answer, agree with
Comply (with)
1. (of a person or group) act in accordance with a wish or command. "we are unable to comply with your request"
2. (of an article) meet specified standards. "all secondhand furniture must comply with the new standards"
Abide
1. accept or act in accordance with (a rule, decision, or recommendation). "I said I would abide by their decision" synonyms: comply with, obey, follow
Neglect
(v) 1. fail to care for properly. "the old churchyard has been sadly neglected"
2. not pay proper attention to; disregard. "you neglect our advice at your peril"
(n) the state or fact of being uncared for. "animals dying through disease or neglect"
Negligible
so small or unimportant as to be not worth considering; insignificant. "sound could at last be recorded with incredible ease and at negligible cost"
Neighborhood
a district, especially one forming a community within a town or city. "she lived in a wealthy neighborhood of Boston" synonyms: district, area
Nemesis
1. something that a person cannot conquer, achieve, etc.: The performance test proved to be my nemesis.
2. an opponent or rival whom a person cannot best or overcome.
Nevertheless
in spite of that; notwithstanding; all the same.
"statements which, although literally true, are nevertheless misleading"
Noise
a sound, esp. one that is loud or unpleasant or that causes disturbance.
Nonetheless
in spite of that; nevertheless. "it was the barest of welcomes, but it was a welcome nonetheless"
Note
(n) 1. a brief record of facts, topics, or thoughts, written down as an aid to memory. "I'll make a note in my diary"
2. a short informal letter or written message. "I left her a note explaining where I was going"
(v) 1. notice or pay particular attention to (something). "noting his mother's unusual gaiety" synonyms: bear in mind
2. record (something) in writing. "he noted down her address on a piece of paper"
Noteworthy
interesting, significant, or unusual. "it is noteworthy that no one at the bank has accepted responsibility for the failure" synonyms: notable
Notable
(adj) worthy of attention or notice; remarkable.
"the gardens are notable for their collection of magnolias and camellias" synonyms: noteworthy, remarkable
(n) a famous or important person. "businessmen and local notables" synonyms: celebrity, public figure
Notice
(n): attention; observation.
notification or warning of something, esp. to allow preparations to be made.
(v): become aware of.
Noticeable
easily seen or noticed; clear or apparent. "a noticeable increase in staff motivation" synonyms: distinct, evident, obvious, apparent
Notify
inform (someone) of something, typically in a formal or official manner. "you will be notified of our decision as soon as possible" synonyms: inform
Infamous
well known for some bad quality or deed. "an infamous war criminal"
Notion
1. a conception of or belief about something.
"children have different notions about the roles of their parents" synonyms: idea, belief
2. an impulse or desire, especially one of a whimsical kind. "she had a notion to call her friend at work"
Notorious
famous or well known, typically for some bad quality or deed. "Los Angeles is notorious for its smog"
Nourishment
1. the food or other substances necessary for growth, health, and good condition. "tubers from which plants obtain nourishment" synonyms: food, sustenance, nutriment, nutrition
2. the action of nourishing someone or something. "they suck out the sap and eliminate from it a sweet liquid for the nourishment of their young"
Nuisance
a person, thing, or circumstance causing inconvenience or annoyance. "an unreasonable landlord could become a nuisance"
synonyms: annoyance, inconvenience
Obesity
(n) state of being excessively overweight
Obese
(adj) grossly fat or overweight.
Obey
comply with the command, direction, or request of (a person or a law); submit to the authority of.
Object
(n) 1. a material thing that can be seen and touched. "he was dragging a large object" synonyms: thing, article, item
2. a person or thing to which a specified action or feeling is directed. "disease became the object of investigation" synonyms: target, butt, focus
(v) say something to express one's disapproval of or disagreement with something. "residents object to the volume of traffic"
Obligate
bind or compel (someone), especially legally or morally. "the medical establishment is obligated to take action in the best interest of the public"
Obligation
an act or course of action to which a person is morally or legally bound; a duty or commitment.
Oblige
1. make (someone) legally or morally bound to an action or course of action. "doctors are obliged by law to keep patients alive while there is a chance of recovery"
2. do as (someone) asks or desires in order to help or please them. "oblige me by not being sorry for yourself"
3. be indebted or grateful. "if you can give me a few minutes of your time I'll be much obliged"
Obnoxious
extremely unpleasant.
Observe
1. notice or perceive (something) and register it as being significant. "young people observe that decisions are made by others"
2. fulfill or comply with (a social, legal, ethical, or religious obligation). "a tribunal must observe the principles of natural justice"
Obsolete
(adj) 1. no longer in general use; fallen into disuse:
an obsolete expression.
2. of a discarded or outmoded type; out of date:
an obsolete battleship.
(v) to make obsolete by replacing with something newer or better; antiquate: Automation has obsoleted many factory workers.
Obtain
get, acquire, or secure (something). "an opportunity to obtain advanced degrees" Synonyms: get, acquire, come by, secure
Occupation
1. a job or profession. "his prime occupation was as editor"
2. the action, state, or period of occupying or being occupied by military force. "the Roman occupation of Britain"
Occupy
1. reside or have one's place of business in (a building). "the apartment she occupies in Manhattan"
synonyms: inhabited
2. fill or preoccupy (the mind or thoughts). "her mind was occupied with alarming questions"
Occur
happen; take place. "the accident occurred at about 3:30 p.m." synonyms: happen, take place, come about
Odor
a distinctive smell, especially an unpleasant one. "the odor of cigarette smoke" synonyms: smell
Off
(adv) 1. away from the place in question; to or at a distance. "the man ran off"
2. so as to be removed or separated. "he whipped off his coat"
(prep) 1. moving away and often down from. "he rolled off the bed"
2. situated or leading in a direction away from (a main route or intersection).
"single wires leading off the main lines"
(adj) 1. characterized by someone performing or feeling worse than usual; unsatisfactory or inadequate. "even the greatest athletes have off days"
2. (of food) no longer fresh. "the fish was a bit off" synonyms: rotten
Off limits
1. out of bounds. "they declared the site off limits"
2. used to say that people are not allowed to talk about something
Off the books
without being included on official financial records. "waiters, cashiers, and busboys often work off the books, getting paid in cash."
Off the record
not made as an official or attributable statement.
synonyms: unofficial, confidential
Offer
present or proffer (something) for (someone) to accept or reject as so desired.
"may I offer you a drink?"
On/In behalf of
1. as a representative of or a proxy for:
On behalf of my colleagues, I address you tonight.
2. in /on someone's behalf, in the interest or aid of (someone): He interceded in my behalf.
- for the benefit of; in the interest of."
On board
"on or in a ship, aircraft, or other vehicle.
On purpose
intentionally
On the contrary
used to intensify a denial of what has just been implied or stated. "there was no malice in her; on the contrary, she was very kind"
On the fly
while in motion or progress.
"his deep shot was caught on the fly"
On the grounds that
...
On the other hand
used to present factors that are opposed or that support opposing opinions.
"a conflict between their rationally held views on the one hand and their emotions and desires on the other"
On your own
unaccompanied by others; alone or unaided.
"I have to do things on my own"
Once and for all
now and for the last time; finally.
One of a kind
unique
Ongoing
continuing; still in progress. "ongoing negotiations"
Open
(adj) 1. not closed or barred at the time, as a doorway by a door, a window by a sash, or a gateway by a gate: to leave the windows open at night.
2. relatively free of obstructions to sight, movement, or internal arrangement: an open floor plan.
(v) move or adjust (a door or window) so as to leave a space allowing access and view. "she opened the door and went in"
Opening
(n) 1. an aperture or gap, especially one allowing access. "she peered through one of the smaller openings"
2. a beginning; an initial part. "Maya started tapping out the opening of her story"
(adj) coming at the beginning of something; initial.
"she stole the show with her opening remark"
Operate
1. (of a person) control the functioning of (a machine, process, or system). "a shortage of workers to operate new machines"
2. perform a surgical operation. "the surgeons refused to operate" synonyms: perform surgery, do an operation
Opinion
a view or judgment formed about something, not necessarily based on fact or knowledge. "I'm writing to voice my opinion on an issue of great importance" synonyms: belief, judgment
Opportunity
a set of circumstances that makes it possible to do something. "we may see increased opportunities for export"
Optimise
make optimal; get the most out of; use best
Ordinary
(adj) with no special or distinctive features; normal. "he sets out to depict ordinary people"
(n) what is commonplace or standard.
"their clichés were vested with enough emotion to elevate them above the ordinary"
Assemble
1. (of people) gather together in one place for a common purpose. "a crowd had assembled outside the gates"
2. fit together the separate component parts of (a machine or other object). "a factory that assembled parts for trucks"
Assembly
1. a group of people gathered together in one place for a common purpose. "an assembly of scholars and poets" synonyms: gathering, meeting
2. the action of gathering together as a group for a common purpose. "a decree guaranteeing freedom of assembly"
3. the action of fitting together the component parts of a machine or other object. "a car assembly plant"
Convention
1. A formal meeting of members, representatives, or delegates, as of a political party, fraternal society, profession, or industry.
2. a way in which something is usually done, especially within a particular area or activity.
"the woman who overturned so many conventions of children's literature"
3. an agreement between countries covering particular matters, especially one less formal than a treaty. synonyms: agreement, accord
Organize
(v) 1. arrange into a structured whole; order.
"organize lessons in a planned way" synonyms: (put in) order, arrange, sort (out), assemble.
2. make arrangements or preparations for (an event or activity); coordinate. "the union organized a 24-hour general strike"
Other
1. used to refer to a person or thing that is different or distinct from one already mentioned or known about. "stick the camera on a tripod or some other means of support"
2. further; additional. "one other word of advice" synonyms: more, further, additional, extra, added, supplementary
Another
1. used to refer to an additional person or thing of the same type as one already mentioned or known about; one more; a further. "have another drink" synonyms: one more, a further, an additional
2. used to refer to a different person or thing from one already mentioned or known about. "come back another day"
Other Than
with the exception of : except for, besides <other than that, nothing happened>
Otherways
see: otherwise
Otherwise
1. in circumstances different from those present or considered; or else. "the collection brings visitors who might not come to the college otherwise" synonyms: or, or else, if not
2. in other respects; apart from that. "an otherwise totally black cat with a single white whisker"
3. in a different state or situation. "if it were otherwise, we would be unable to acquire knowledge"
Oust
drive out or expel (someone) from a position or place. "he ousted a long-term incumbent by only 500 votes" synonyms: drive out, expel, force out, throw out
Out of
motivated by ; "idleness is the trait of being idle out of a reluctance to work"
Outlook
1. a person's point of view or general attitude to life.
"broaden your outlook on life" synonyms: point of view, viewpoint, views, opinion, (way of) thinking, perspective
2. a view. "the pleasant outlook from the lodge window" synonyms: view, vista, prospect, panorama, scene, aspect
Overdose
(n) an excessive and dangerous dose of a drug.
"she took an overdose the day her husband left"
(v) take an overdose of a drug. "he was admitted to the hospital after overdosing on cocaine"
Overhaul
(v) take apart (a piece of machinery or equipment) in order to examine it and repair it if necessary.
"a company that overhauls and repairs aircraft engines"
(n) a thorough examination of machinery or a system, with repairs or changes made if necessary.
"a major overhaul of environmental policies"
Overkill
- the amount by which destruction or the capacity for destruction exceeds what is necessary.
"the existing nuclear overkill"
- excessive use, treatment, or action; too much of something. "animators now face a dilemma of technology overkill"
Dilemma
a situation in which a difficult choice has to be made between two or more alternatives, especially equally undesirable ones.
"the people often face the dilemma of feeding themselves or their cattle"
Overseas
n or to a foreign country, especially one across the sea. "he spent quite a lot of time working overseas"
Overthrow
(v) remove forcibly from power.
"military coups which had attempted to overthrow the king"
(n) a removal from power; a defeat or downfall.
"plotting the overthrow of the government"
Overview
a general review or summary of a subject.
"a critical overview of the scientific issues of our time"
Overwhelming
very great in amount. "he was elected president by an overwhelming majority"
Overwhelm
1. bury or drown beneath a huge mass. "the water flowed through to overwhelm the whole dam and the village beneath" =Submerge
2. defeat completely. "his teams overwhelmed their opponents"
3. give too much of a thing to (someone); inundate.
"they were overwhelmed by farewell messages"
4. have a strong emotional effect on.
"I was overwhelmed with guilt"
5. be too strong for; overpower.
"the wine doesn't overwhelm the flavor of the trout"
Backup
help or support. "no police backup could be expected" synonyms: help, support, assistance, aid
Painkiller
a drug or medicine for relieving pain.
Pair
(n) a set of two things used together or regarded as a unit. "a pair of gloves" synonyms: set (of two), matching set, two of a kind
(v) join or connect to form a pair. "a cardigan paired with a matching skirt" synonyms: match, put together, couple, twin
Pantry
a small room or closet in which food, dishes, and utensils are kept.
Parade
A public procession, esp. one celebrating a special day or event and including marching bands and floats
Paradox
(n) - a statement or proposition that, despite sound (or apparently sound) reasoning from acceptable premises, leads to a conclusion that seems senseless, logically unacceptable, or self-contradictory. "a potentially serious conflict between quantum mechanics and the general theory of relativity known as the information paradox"
- a seemingly absurd or self-contradictory statement or proposition that when investigated or explained may prove to be well founded or true. "in a paradox, he has discovered that stepping back from his job has increased the rewards he gleans from it"
- a situation, person, or thing that combines contradictory features or qualities. "the mingling of deciduous trees with elements of desert flora forms a fascinating ecological paradox"
Participate
take part.
"thousands participated in a nationwide strike"
Particular
1. used to single out an individual member of a specified group or class. "the action seems to discriminate against a particular group of companies"
synonyms: specific, certain
2. especially great or intense. "when handling or checking cash the cashier should exercise particular care"
Pastime
an activity that someone does regularly for enjoyment rather than work; a hobby. "his favorite pastimes were shooting and golf" synonyms: hobby
Leisure
- use of free time for enjoyment. "increased opportunities for leisure"
- opportunity afforded by free time to do something.
"writers with enough leisure to practice their art"
- freedom from the demands of work or duty:
She looked forward to retirement and a life of leisure.
Patch
(n) 1. a small piece, scrap, or area of anything: a patch of ice on the road.
2. a piece of cloth or other material used to mend or strengthen a torn or weak point.
(v) mend or strengthen (fabric or an item of clothing) by putting a piece of material over a hole or weak point in it. "her jeans were neatly patched"
Patron
1. a person who gives financial or other support to a person, organization, cause, or activity. "Charles became a patron of Rubens and van Dyck" synonyms: sponsor, backer, financier
2. a customer, especially a regular one, of a store, restaurant, or theater. "we surveyed the plushness of the hotel and its sleek, well-dressed patrons"
Patronize
1. treat with an apparent kindness that betrays a feeling of superiority.
""She's a good-hearted girl," he said in a patronizing voice"
2. frequent (a store, theater, restaurant, or other establishment) as a customer. "restaurants remaining open in the evening were well patronized"
synonyms: do business with, buy from
Under the table
(especially of making a payment) secretly or covertly.
"he accepted a slew of payoffs under the table"
Pay attention
...
Peace
1. freedom from disturbance; quiet and tranquility.
"you can while away an hour or two in peace and seclusion"
2. freedom from or the cessation of war or violence.
"the Straits were to be open to warships in time of peace"
Peel
remove the outer covering or skin from (a fruit, vegetable, or shrimp).
Perception
1. the ability to see, hear, or become aware of something through the senses. "the normal limits to human perception"
2. the state of being or process of becoming aware of something through the senses. "the perception of pain" synonyms: recognition, awareness
3. a way of regarding, understanding, or interpreting something; a mental impression. "Hollywood's perception of the tastes of the American public"
Perceptive
(adj) having or showing sensitive insight.
"an extraordinarily perceptive account of their relationship"
Perform
1. carry out, accomplish, or fulfill (an action, task, or function). "I have my duties to perform" synonyms: carry out, do, execute, discharge
2. present (a form of entertainment) to an audience.
"the cast of 14 perform the play superbly"
Performance
1. an act of staging or presenting a play, concert, or other form of entertainment.
"Don Giovanni had its first performance in 1787"
2. the action or process of carrying out or accomplishing an action, task, or function.
"the continual performance of a single task reduces a man to the level of a machine"
3. the capabilities of a machine, vehicle, or product, especially when observed under particular conditions. "the hardware is put through tests that assess the performance of the processor"
Permanent
lasting or intended to last or remain unchanged indefinitely. "a permanent ban on the dumping of radioactive waste at sea" synonyms: lasting
Permeable
(of a material or membrane) allowing liquids or gases to pass through it. "a frog's skin is permeable to water"
Permit
(v) give authorization or consent to (someone) to do something.
"the law permits councils to monitor any factory emitting smoke"
synonyms: allow, authorize, give someone permission
(n) a written order granting special permission to do something
Permitted
Allowed
Perpetrate
carry out or commit (a harmful, illegal, or immoral action). "a crime has been perpetrated against a sovereign state"
Persist
continue firmly or obstinately in an opinion or a course of action in spite of difficulty, opposition, or failure. "the minority of drivers who persist in drinking"
Personnel
The body of persons employed by or active in an organization, business, or service.
Perspective
1. a particular attitude toward or way of regarding something; a point of view. "most guidebook history is written from the editor's perspective" synonyms: outlook, view, viewpoint, point of view
2. the art of drawing solid objects on a two-dimensional surface so as to give the right impression of their height, width, depth, and position in relation to each other when viewed from a particular point. "a perspective drawing"
Persuade
cause (someone) to do something through reasoning or argument. "it wasn't easy, but I persuaded him to do the right thing"
Perverse
(adj) 1. (of a person or their actions) showing a deliberate and obstinate desire to behave in a way that is unreasonable or unacceptable, often in spite of the consequences. "Kate's perverse decision not to cooperate"
2. contrary to the accepted or expected standard or practice. "in two general elections the outcome was quite perverse" synonyms: illogical, irrational, unreasonable
Pessimist
a person who habitually sees or anticipates the worst or is disposed to be gloomy
Pharmacist
a person who is professionally qualified to prepare and dispense medicinal drugs.
Pick
(v) 1. take hold of and remove (a flower, fruit, or vegetable) from where it is growing. "I went to pick some flowers for Jenny's room"
2. choose (someone or something) from a number of alternatives, typically after careful thought. "maybe I picked the wrong career after all"
(n) an act or the right of selecting something from among a group of alternatives. "take your pick from our extensive menu" synonyms: choice, selection
Pick something up
1. collect something that has been left elsewhere.
"Wanda came over to pick up her things"
2. obtain, acquire, or learn something, especially without formal arrangements or instruction. "he had picked up a little Russian from his father"
Pick up
1. to lift someone or something up from a surface "He picked the phone up and dialed." Antonyms: drop off
2. to go and meet someone or something that you have arranged to take somewhere in a vehicle "Will you pick me up after the party?" "I'll pick up my luggage in the morning."
3. to take someone who is waiting by the road into your vehicle and take them somewhere "We picked up a hitchhiker on the way."
4. to learn a new skill or start a habit without intending to. "She picked up a few German phrases while staying in Berlin."
5. to improve "They won't let him out of hospital until his health has picked up quite a lot."
Pill
a small round mass of solid medicine to be swallowed whole. synonyms: tablet, capsule
pillar
a tall vertical structure of stone, wood, or metal, used as a support for a building, or as an ornament or monument. synonyms: column
Piss
(v) To urinate.
(n) urine
Piss off
1. To make angry.
2. Used in the imperative as a signal of angry dismissal.
Pivot
(n) the central point, pin, or shaft on which a mechanism turns or oscillates.
(v) turn on or as if on a pivot. "the sail pivots around the axis of a virtually static mast"
Place
(n) 1. a particular position, point, or area in space; a location. "I can't be in two places at once" synonyms: location, site, spot
2. a portion of space designated or available for or being used by someone. "they hurried to their places at the table" synonyms: seat
(v) 1. put in a particular position. "a newspaper had been placed beside my plate"
2. find a home or employment for. "the children were placed with foster-parents"
Plan
(n) 1. a detailed proposal for doing or achieving something. "the UN peace plan" synonyms: scheme
2. an intention or decision about what one is going to do. "I have no plans to retire" synonyms: intention
(v) 1. decide on and make arrangements for in advance. "they were planning a trip to Egypt"
2. design or make a plan of (something to be made or built). "she had planned the garden from scratch"
Platform
1- a raised level surface on which people or things can stand.
2- a standard for the hardware of a computer system, determining what kinds of software it can run.
Play
(v) 1. engage in activity for enjoyment and recreation rather than a serious or practical purpose. "the children were playing by a pool" synonyms: amuse oneself, entertain oneself
2. take part in (a sport). "I play squash and badminton" synonyms: take part in, participate in, engage in, be involved in
(n) 1. activity engaged in for enjoyment and recreation, especially by children. "a child at play may use a stick as an aeroplane" synonyms: amusement, entertainment
2. a dramatic work for the stage or to be broadcast. "the actors put on a new play"
Playing Musical Chairs
Is she PLAYING MUSICAL CHAIRS? I can't believe she's changed jobs again!
Pleasant
giving a sense of happy satisfaction or enjoyment.
"a very pleasant evening"
Pledge
(n)1. a solemn promise or undertaking. "the conference ended with a joint pledge to limit pollution" synonyms: promise
2. LAW: a thing that is given as security for the fulfillment of a contract or the payment of a debt and is liable to forfeiture in the event of failure.syn: bond.
(v) commit (a person or organization) by a solemn promise. "the government pledged itself to deal with environmental problems"
Plenty of (something)
a large or sufficient amount or quantity; more than enough. "I would have plenty of time to get home before my parents arrived"
Ploy
a cunning plan or action designed to turn a situation to one's own advantage. "the president has dismissed the referendum as a ploy to buy time"
Plug
(n): a device for making an electrical connection, esp. between an appliance and a power supply, consisting of an insulated casing with metal pins that fit into holes in an outlet.
(v): insert (something) into an opening so as to fill it.
Point
(v) 1. direct someone's attention towards something by extending one's finger or something held in one's hand. "the lads were nudging each other and pointing at me"
2. cite a fact or situation as evidence of something. "he points to several factors supporting this conclusion"
(n) 1. the tapered, sharp end of a tool, weapon, or other object. "the point of his dagger" synonyms: tip, sharp end
2. a dot or other punctuation mark, in particular a full stop.
Popular
liked or admired by many people or by a particular person or group. "she was one of the most popular girls in the school"
Portable
able to be easily carried or moved, especially because being of a lighter and smaller version than usual. "a portable television"
Portion
a part of a whole. "a portion of the jetty still stands"
Pose
(v) 1. present or constitute (a problem or danger). "the sheer number of visitors is posing a threat to the area" synonyms: constitute, present, create, cause
2. assume a particular position in order to be photographed, painted, or drawn. "the prime minister posed for photographers"
(n) a way of standing or sitting, especially in order to be photographed, painted, or drawn. "photographs of boxers in ferocious poses" synonyms: posture, position
Possibility
a thing that may happen or be the case. "relegation remains a distinct possibility" synonyms: chance, likelihood, probability
Post
(n) a long, sturdy piece of timber or metal set upright in the ground and used as a support or marker. "follow the blue posts until the track meets a road"
(v) 1. display (a notice) in a public place.
"a curt notice had been posted on the door"
2. announce or publish (something, especially a financial result). "the company posted a £460,000 loss"
Postpone
cause or arrange for (something) to take place at a time later than that first scheduled. "the visit had to be postponed for some time" synonyms: put off, delay
Potential
(adj) having or showing the capacity to develop into something in the future. "a campaign to woo potential customers"
(n) latent qualities or abilities that may be developed and lead to future success or usefulness. "a young broadcaster with great potential"
Pour
(v) 1. flow rapidly in a steady stream. "water poured off the roof" synonyms: stream
2. cause (a liquid) to flow from a container in a steady stream. "she poured a little whisky into a glass"
Pout
(v) push one's lips or one's bottom lip forward as an expression of petulant annoyance or in order to make oneself look sexually attractive. "she lounged on the steps, pouting"
(n) a pouting expression. "his lower lip protruded in a sulky pout"
Power outage
equipment failure resulting when the supply of power fails; "the ice storm caused a power outage"
Practice
(n) 1. the actual application or use of an idea, belief, or method, as opposed to theories relating to it. "the principles and practice of teaching" synonyms: application
2. the customary, habitual, or expected procedure or way of doing of something.
"product placement is common practice in American movies"
(v) 1. perform (an activity) or exercise (a skill) repeatedly or regularly in order to acquire, improve or maintain proficiency in it. "I need to practise my French" synonyms: rehearse
2. carry out or perform (a particular activity, method, or custom) habitually or regularly. "we still practise some of these rituals today"
Praise
(v) 1. express warm approval or admiration of. "we can't praise Chris enough—he did a brilliant job"
2. express one's respect and gratitude towards (a deity), especially in song. "we praise God for past blessings" synonyms: worship, glorify
(n) 1. the expression of approval or admiration for someone or something. "the audience was full of praise for the whole production"
2. the expression of respect and gratitude as an act of worship. "give praise to God"
Precaution
a measure taken in advance to prevent something dangerous, unpleasant, or inconvenient from happening. "he had taken the precaution of seeking legal advice"
Precious
(adj) of great value; not to be wasted or treated carelessly. "precious works of art"
(n) used as a term of address for a beloved person. "don't be frightened, my precious"
Precise
marked by exactness and accuracy of expression or detail. "precise directions" synonyms: exact, accurate
Precisely
in exact terms; without vagueness. "the guidelines are precisely defined"
Precursor
a person or thing that comes before another of the same kind; a forerunner. "a three-stringed precursor of the violin"
Predict
say or estimate that (a specified thing) will happen in the future or will be a consequence of something. "it is too early to predict a result" synonyms: forecast, foretell, foresee
Predominant
(adj) 1. present as the strongest or main element. "the predominant colour was white" synonyms: main, chief, principal
2. having or exerting control or power. "the predominant political forces" synonyms: controlling, in control
Predominantly
mainly; for the most part. "it is predominantly a coastal bird" synonyms: mainly, mostly, for the most part
Premise
(n) a previous statement or proposition from which another is inferred or follows as a conclusion. "if the premise is true, then the conclusion must be true"
(v) base an argument, theory, or undertaking on. "the reforms were premised on our findings"
Prepare
1. make (something) ready for use or consideration.
"prepare a brief summary of the article"
2. make (someone) ready or able to do or deal with something. "schools should prepare children for life"
Prescribe
1. (of a medical practitioner) advise and authorize the use of (a medicine or treatment) for someone, especially in writing. "her doctor prescribed sleeping tablets"
2. state authoritatively or as a rule that (an action or procedure) should be carried out. "rules prescribing five acts for a play are purely arbitrary"
Prescription
1. an instruction written by a medical practitioner that authorizes a patient to be issued with a medicine or treatment. "he scribbled a prescription for tranquillizers"
2. a recommendation that is authoritatively put forward. "effective prescriptions for sustaining rural communities"
Presence
1. the state or fact of existing, occurring, or being present. "my presence in the flat made her happy"
2. a person or thing that exists or is present in a place but is not seen.
Present
(adj) 1. in a particular place. "a doctor must be present at the ringside"
2. existing or occurring now. "she did not expect to find herself in her present situation"
(n) the period of time now occurring. "they are happy and at peace, refusing to think beyond the present"
Preserve
(v) 1. maintain (something) in its original or existing state. "all records of the past were zealously preserved"
2. treat (food) to prevent its decomposition. "freezing and canning can be reliable methods of preserving foods"
Pressing
requiring quick or immediate action or attention. "inflation was the most pressing problem"
Pressing
...
Presumably
used to convey that what is asserted is very likely though not known for certain. "it was not yet ten o'clock, so presumably the boys were still at the pub" synonyms: I assume
Pressing issue
...
Pretend
1. behave so as to make it appear that something is the case when in fact it is not. "I closed my eyes and pretended I was asleep"
2. lay claim to (a quality or title). "he cannot pretend to sophistication"
Pretense
1. an attempt to make something that is not the case appear true. "his anger is masked by a pretence that all is well"
2. a claim to have a particular skill or quality. "he was quick to disclaim any pretence to superiority"
Pretentious
attempting to impress by affecting greater importance or merit than is actually possessed. "pretentious art films"
Prevail
1. prove more powerful or superior. "it is hard for logic to prevail over emotion" synonyms: win
2. persuade (someone) to do something. "she was prevailed upon to give an account of her work"
Primal
1. relating to an early stage in evolutionary development; primeval. "primal hunting societies" synonyms: original, initial
2. most important; primary or fundamental. "rivers were the primal highways of life" synonyms: basic, fundamental, essential
Primary
1. of chief importance; principal. "the government's primary aim is to see significant reductions in unemployment" synonyms: main
2. earliest in time or order. "the primary stage of their political education"
Principal
(adj) 1. first in order of importance; main.
"the country's principal cities"
2. denoting an original sum invested or lent. "the principal amount of your investment"
(n) the most important or senior person in an organization or group. "a design consultancy whose principal is based in San Francisco" synonyms: boss, chief
Principle
(n) 1. a fundamental truth or proposition that serves as the foundation for a system of belief or behaviour or for a chain of reasoning. "the basic principles of justice"
2. a general scientific theorem or law that has numerous special applications across a wide field.
Privilege
a special right, advantage, or immunity granted or available only to a particular person or group. "education is a right, not a privilege" synonyms: advantage, right, benefit
Presume
1. suppose that something is the case on the basis of probability. "I presumed that the man had been escorted from the building"
2. be arrogant or impertinent enough to do something.
"kindly don't presume to issue me orders in my own house"
Proceed
1. begin a course of action. "the consortium could proceed with the plan"
2. move forward. "from the High Street, proceed over Magdalen Bridge"
Problem
a matter or situation regarded as unwelcome or harmful and needing to be dealt with and overcome.
"they have financial problems" synonyms: difficulty, issue, trouble, worry, complication
Proclaim
1. announce officially or publicly. "the government's chief scientific adviser proclaimed that the epidemic was under control"
2. indicate clearly. "his high, intelligent forehead proclaimed a strength of mind that was almost tangible"
Process
(n): a series of actions or steps taken in order to achieve a particular end.
(v): perform a series of mechanical or chemical operations on (something) in order to change or preserve it.
Procure
obtain (something), especially with care or effort. "food procured for the rebels"
Profit
(n) 1. a financial gain, especially the difference between the amount earned and the amount spent in buying, operating, or producing something.
"record pre-tax profits"
2. advantage; benefit. "there's no profit in screaming at referees from the bench"
(v) obtain a financial advantage or benefit.
"the only people to profit from the episode were the lawyers"
Profound
(adj) 1. (of a state, quality, or emotion) very great or intense. "profound feelings of disquiet"
2. (of a person or statement) having or showing great knowledge or insight. "a profound philosopher"
Progress
(n) 1. forward or onward movement towards a destination. "the darkness did not stop my progress"
2. development towards an improved or more advanced condition. "we are making progress towards equal rights"
(v) 1. move forward or onward in space or time.
"as the century progressed the quality of telescopes improved"
2. develop towards an improved or more advanced condition. "work on the pond is progressing"
Procrastination
To put off doing something, especially out of habitual carelessness or laziness.
Project
(v) 1. estimate or forecast (something) on the basis of present trends. "spending was projected at £72,900 million" synonyms: forecast, predict
2. extend outwards beyond something else; protrude.
"I noticed a slip of paper projecting from the book"
(n) an individual or collaborative enterprise that is carefully planned to achieve a particular aim. "a research project"
Prolonged
continuing for a long time or longer than usual; lengthy.
"the region suffered a prolonged drought"
Promote
1. support or actively encourage (a cause, venture, etc.); further the progress of. "some regulation is still required to promote competition"
2. raise (someone) to a higher position or rank. "she was promoted to General Manager"
Prompt
(v) 1. (of an event or fact) cause or bring about (an action or feeling). "the violence prompted a wave of refugees to flee the country"
2. cause someone to take a course of action. "curiosity prompted him to look inside" synonyms: induce
3. encourage (a hesitating speaker) to say something.
"'And the picture?' he prompted" synonyms: remind, cue
(n) 1. an act of encouraging a hesitating speaker. "with barely a prompt, Barbara talked on"
2. the time limit for the payment of an account, stated on a prompt note.
(adj) 1. done without delay; immediate. "she would have died but for the prompt action of two ambulancemen" synonyms: quick, swift
2. ready in action; quick to act as occasion demands.
Promptly
1. with little or no delay; immediately. "he paid the fine promptly"
2. at exactly a specified time; punctually. "Jamie arrived promptly at 8:30"
Pronounce
1. make the sound of (a word or part of a word) in the correct or a particular way. "Gerry pronounced the hero's name 'Cahoolin'"
2. declare or announce in a formal or solemn way. "allow history to pronounce the verdict"
Prohibit
formally forbid (something) by law, rule, or other authority. "all ivory trafficking between nations is prohibited" synonyms: forbid, ban
Proper
(adj) 1. denoting something that is truly what it is said or regarded to be; genuine. "she's never had a proper job"
2. of the required or correct type or form; suitable or appropriate. "an artist needs the proper tools"
Propose
1. put forward (a plan or suggestion) for consideration by others. "he proposed a new nine-point peace plan"
2. make an offer of marriage to someone. "I have already proposed to Sarah"
Proposition
1. a statement or assertion that expresses a judgement or opinion. "the proposition that high taxation is undesirable" synonyms: theory, hypothesis, thesis, argument, premise
2. a suggested scheme or plan of action, especially in a business context. "a detailed investment proposition"
synonyms: proposal, scheme, plan, project
Prosecute
1. institute or conduct legal proceedings against (a person or organization). "they were prosecuted for obstructing the highway"
2. continue with (a course of action) with a view to its completion. "a serious threat to the government's ability to prosecute the war"
Prospect
(n) 1. the possibility or likelihood of some future event occurring. "there was no prospect of a reconciliation"
synonyms: likelihood, hope, expectation, anticipation
2. a person regarded as likely to succeed or as a potential customer, client, etc. "Norwich's unbeaten heavyweight prospect" synonyms: candidate
Prosperity
the state of being prosperous. "a long period of peace and prosperity" synonyms: wealth
Prosperous
- successful in material terms; flourishing financially. "prosperous middle-class professionals"
- bringing wealth and success. "we wish you a Merry Christmas and a prosperous New Year"
Thriving
prosperous and growing; flourishing. "the thriving business George has built up"
Prove
demonstrate the truth or existence of (something) by evidence or argument. "the concept is difficult to prove"
Provide
1. make available for use; supply. "these clubs provide a much appreciated service for this area" synonyms: supply, give, issue, furnish
2. make adequate preparation for (a possible event). "new qualifications must provide for changes in technology"
Provocative
(adj) causing anger or another strong reaction, especially deliberately. "a provocative article" synonyms: annoying, irritating
Provoke
1. stimulate or give rise to (a reaction or emotion, typically a strong or unwelcome one) in someone. "the decision provoked a storm of protest from civil rights organizations" synonyms: arouse, produce, evoke
2. stimulate or incite (someone) to do or feel something, especially by arousing anger in them. "a teacher can provoke you into working harder"
Publication
1. the preparation and issuing of a book, journal, or piece of music for public sale. "the publication of her first novel"
2. a book or journal issued for public sale. "scientific publications"
Pull
(v) exert force on (someone or something) so as to cause movement towards oneself. "he pulled her down on to the couch"
(n) an act of pulling something. "give the hair a quick pull and it comes out by the roots"
Pull (something) off
succeed in achieving or winning something difficult. "he pulled off a brilliant first round win"
Pull the trigger
he person who pulls the trigger is the one who does the action that closes or finishes something.
Pull together
1. to organize something; to arrange something. "How about a party? I'll see if I can pull something together for Friday night."
2. to assemble something, such as a meal. "I will hardly have time to pull a snack together." "I will pull a nice dinner together for the two of us."
3. to cooperate; to work well together. "Let's all pull together and get this done. If we pull together as a team, we can get this job done on time."
4. to tidy things up; to straighten things up and make them orderly. "This place is a mess. Please pull things together."
Properly
1. correctly or satisfactorily. "ensuring the work is carried out properly"
2. in the strict sense; exactly. "algebra is, properly speaking, the analysis of equations"
Punish
inflict a penalty or sanction on (someone) as retribution for an offence, especially a transgression of a legal or moral code. "I have done wrong and I'm being punished for it"
Purchase
(v) acquire (something) by paying for it; buy. "Mr Gill spotted the manuscript at a local auction and purchased it for £1,500"
(n) the action of buying something. "the large number of videos currently available for purchase"
Purpose
1. the reason for which something is done or created or for which something exists. "the purpose of the meeting is to appoint a trustee" synonyms: motive, motivation, grounds
2. a person's sense of resolve or determination. "there was a new sense of purpose in her step as she set off" synonyms: determination
Pursue
follow or chase (someone or something).
"the officer pursued the van" synonyms: go after, run after, follow, chase
Put down
1. record something in writing. "he's putting a few thoughts down on paper"
2. suppress a rebellion, coup, or riot by force. "the security forces put down a coup attempt in the capital" synonyms: suppress, put an end to, crush
Put down stakes/Pull up stakes
...
Put Off
1. To delay; postpone: put off paying the bills.
2. To persuade to delay further action: managed to put off the creditors for another week.
Put to good use
Employ to the best advantage, as in I'm sure this dictionary will be put to good use.
Punishment
the infliction or imposition of a penalty as retribution for an offence. "crime demands just punishment"
Put up
stay temporarily in accommodation other than one's own home.
"we put up at a hotel in the city centre"
Quality
1. the standard of something as measured against other things of a similar kind; the degree of excellence of something. "an improvement in product quality"
2. a distinctive attribute or characteristic possessed by someone or something. "he shows strong leadership qualities" synonyms: feature, trait, attribute, characteristic
Quite
to a certain or fairly significant extent or degree; fairly.
"it's quite warm outside"
Put up with
to tolerate or accept somebody or something calmly
Raise
(n) an increase in salary.
(v) 1. lift or move to a higher position or level.
"she raised both arms above her head"
2. increase the amount, level, or strength of.
"the bank raised interest rates"
3. bring up (a child). "he was born and raised in San Francisco"
Rambling
(adj) (of writing or speech) lengthy and confused or inconsequential. "a rambling six-hour speech"
(n) the activity of walking in the countryside for pleasure. "a rambling club"
Ramification
a complex or unwelcome consequence of an action or event. "any change is bound to have legal ramifications"
synonyms: consequence, result, aftermath, outcome
Rate
(n) 1. a measure, quantity, or frequency, typically one measured against another quantity or measure.
"the island has the lowest crime rate in the world"
2. fixed price paid or charged for something. "a £3.40 minimum hourly rate of pay" synonyms: charge, price, cost, tariff, hire, fare
(v) assign a standard or value to (something) according to a particular scale.
"they were asked to rate their ability at different driving manoeuvres" synonyms: assess, evaluate, appraise
Rather than
1. used with the infinitive form of a verb to indicate negation as a contrary choice or wish <rather than continue the argument, he walked away> <chose to sing rather than play violin>
2. and not <obscures rather than resolves the problem> <why do one thing rather than another?> <happy rather than sad>
Rating
a classification or ranking of someone or something based on a comparative assessment of their quality, standard, or performance. "the hotel regained its five-star rating" synonyms: grade, classification, class, grading, ranking, rank
Ratio
the quantitative relation between two amounts showing the number of times one value contains or is contained within the other. "the ratio of men's jobs to women's is 8 to 1" synonyms: proportion
Ragged
worn off
Ration
a fixed amount of a commodity officially allowed to each person during a time of shortage, as in wartime.
"1947 saw the bread ration reduced"
synonyms: allowance, allocation, quota
Rational
based on or in accordance with reason or logic.
"I'm sure there's a perfectly rational explanation"
synonyms: logical, reasoned
Raw
1. (of food) not cooked. "raw eggs"
2. (of a material or substance) in its natural state; unprocessed. "raw silk" synonyms: unprocessed, untreated, unrefined, crude
3. (of a part of the body) red and painful, especially as the result of skin abrasion. "he scrubbed his hands until they were raw"
Row
(n) a number of people or things in a more or less straight line. "her villa stood in a row of similar ones"
(v) propel (a boat) with oars. "out in the bay a small figure was rowing a rubber dinghy"
Realize
1. become fully aware of (something) as a fact; understand clearly. "he realized his mistake at once"
2. cause to happen. "his worst fears have been realized"
Reap
1. cut or gather (a crop or harvest). "many men were employed to reap the harvest"
2. receive (something, especially something beneficial) as a consequence of one's own or another's actions.
"the company is poised to reap the benefits of this investment"
Reasoning
the action of thinking about something in a logical, sensible way. "he explained the reasoning behind his decision at a media conferen