Question

Zea mays (maize, or corn) was originally domesticated in central Mexico at least 70007000 years ago from an endemic grass called teosinte. Teosinte is generally unbranched, has male and female flowers on the same branch, and has few kernels per “cob,” each encased in a hard, leaf-like organ called a glume. In contrast, maize is highly branched, with a male inflorescence (tassel) on its central branch and female inflorescences (cobs) on axillary branches. In addition, maize cobs have many rows of kernels and soft glumes. George Beadle crossed cultivated maize and wild teosinte, which resulted in fully fertile F1_{1} plants. When the F1_{1} plants were self-fertilized, about 1 plant in every 10001000 of the F2_{2} progeny resembled either a modern maize plant or a wild teosinte plant. What did Beadle conclude about whether the different architectures of maize and teosinte were caused by changes with a small effect in many genes or changes with a large effect in just a few genes?

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Answered 10 months ago
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George Beadle found that maize is domesticated from theosin grass even though they have a fairly different phenotype.

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