key words

STUDY
PLAY
Duration
Long/short= how long it is
Dynamics
Loud/Quiet= volume
Timbre/ Sonority
All instruments sound different/ have own sound
Pitch
High/low
Tempo
Fast/Slow= speed
Texture
How many instruments/ sounds
Genre
What type of music E.G rock/classical
Rhythm
Length of notes (group notes as a pattern
Structure
Sections of a piece of music E.G chorus
Melody
the tune of the song
Accompaniment
Backing music
composer
someone who writes music
Era
Period of history
Tonality
Mood/Key- Happy(major)/Sad(minor)
Ensemble
Group performance
Improvisation
Make tune up as you go
Time Signature/ Metre
How many beats per bar
Off beat/ Syncopation
Between the beats
Harmony/ Chords
Several notes together
Instrumentation/Forces
Which instruments are playing and what they are doing
Accompaniment
Musical background to a main part
Continuo/basso continuo
2 Instruments, 1 playing bass line (usually cello) and the others playing chords (usually organ or harpsichord)
Heterophony
Where two or more parts play the same melodic line simultaneously, but there are small variations between them
Homophony
Tune and chords, this is not necessarily more than 1 instrument e.g. the piano RH playing the tune whilst the LH plays chords
Monophony
Music in which only one note is heard at a time- a single melodic line. This may be several instruments or singers singing exactly the same part
Polyphony/counterpoint
More than 1 melody at the same time. Common in opera where several singers are all singing different lyrics at the same time, they are not harmonizing with 1 main singer and several backing singers, all the melody lines are of equal importance
Imitation
Where 1 instrument repeats/copies exactly what another has done
Solo
One player or singer with no accompaniment, or one player or singer with accompaniment that is taking a background role and the soloist is the main focus
Adagio
Slow
Andante
Walking pace
Allegro
Fast
Moderato
Medium/Moderate pace
Vivace
Very fast
Time signature/ Metre
How many beats per bar/count for each chord
Accents
Making a certain note slightly louder to stand out from the rest
Duration
Length of note
Swing rhythm/dotted rhythm
Two notes of the same value (usually quavers) are played with the first lengthened and the second shortened (dotted rhythm)
Syncopation
Emphasizing between the beats where you would normally clap along/drum, such as in reggae music
Triplets
Squeezing 3 notes into the space of 2 e.g. instead of 2 quavers equaling half each, they would equal a 3rd each
Cross rhythm
Clashing rhythms
Polyrhythm
Many rhythms together
Pianissimo
Very quiet
Piano
Quiet
Mezzo Piano
Medium quiet
Mezzo Forte
Medium loud
Forte
Loud
Fortissimo
Very loud
Crescendo
Gradually getting louder <
Diminuendo
Gradually getting quieter >
Sfortzando (sfz)
Suddenly loud
Articulation
Whether notes are played smoothly with as little gap as possible between them (legato) or spikey and jumpy (staccato)
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